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We've recently released our Test Bench 1.7 update for Headphones! Read the Noise isolation R&D Article to learn more.

Shure SE215 Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.5
Review updated Apr 12, 2024 at 02:14 pm
Shure SE215 Picture
6.8
Neutral Sound
6.1
Commute/Travel
6.4
Sports/Fitness
6.0
Office
4.1
Wireless Gaming
6.1
Wired Gaming
2.6
Phone Calls

Shure is a mainstay of professional audio products. They're known for their widely recognizable microphones, which have graced the stages of some of the most iconic concerts of all time, the garages of budding bands, and the studios of your favorite podcasts. Shure's headphone department is comparatively new but is backed by decades of experience. The Shure SE215 in-ear monitors (IEMs) are a no-nonsense, wired set of earphones. Their simple and well-conceived design prioritizes passive noise isolation, which uniquely positions them for monitoring on-stage audio or for enthusiasts who prefer warmer tunings during their listening sessions.

Our Verdict

6.8 Neutral Sound

The Shure SE215 are alright for neutral sound listening. They have a prominent bass and mid-range, making them sound a bit boomy and cluttered. Their treble range is also mostly recessed with a couple of sharp peaks. Like most in-ear designs, the small closed-back earbuds don't offer spacious and immersive soundstages. However, these are designed for monitoring audio, so the tuning makes sense for musicians on stage wanting to hear the rhythm sections and lead instruments with effective noise isolation. They have low distortion, so your audio sounds clean, and because they're in-ears, once you get a good fit, you'll have consistent audio delivery.

Pros
  • Impressive noise isolation.
  • Stable and portable design.
Cons
  • No controls.
  • Soundstage isn't spacious and immersive.
6.1 Commute/Travel

The Shure SE215 are passable for commuting and traveling. They block noise better than some active noise cancelling (ANC) headphones, have a compact design that will fit into your pockets, and feel comfortable for in-ears. Their build quality and case ensure they'll endure your commute. Unfortunately, they have no in-line remote or control scheme. Also, because they only block environmental noise through passive isolation, you can't switch to an ambient mode on the fly if someone starts talking to you, even if you don't need to worry about a battery.

Pros
  • Impressive noise isolation.
  • Stable and portable design.
  • Minimal sound leakage.
Cons
  • No controls.
  • No microphone.
  • No listening modes.
6.4 Sports/Fitness

The Shure SE215 are acceptable for sports and fitness. They have a stabilizing over-ear cable coupled with a deep in-ear fit, so they don't move around much. The sound profile supplies a good amount of punch to motivate your workout. Their size is compact enough to carry on you, stowed in the zip case. While they lack an IP rating against water and dust, their build quality is robust. Unfortunately, they don't have a control scheme, which isn't ideal when working out or running.

Pros
  • Durable build quality.
  • Stable and portable design.
Cons
  • No controls.
  • Cable might get in the way while exercising.
6.0 Office

The Shure SE215 are mediocre for office use. Despite a comfortable fit, they aren't ideal headphones to wear for your entire work shift due to their invasive in-ear fitting design. They lack controls and a mic for audio playback and online meetings. However, they barely leak your audio, so you won't bother your office mates. They also block a lot of passive noise, like communal kitchen and ambient noise. Plus, you don't have to monitor battery levels.

Pros
  • Impressive noise isolation.
  • Minimal sound leakage.
Cons
  • No controls.
  • No microphone.
4.1 Wireless Gaming

The Shure SE215 are wired headphones; you can't use them for wireless gaming.

6.1 Wired Gaming

The Shure SE215 are not bad for gaming. Their elevated bass response helps you hear sounds like footsteps in games. They have a consistent frequency response delivery for predictable sound between wears. Their isolation performance also helps block out distractions. However, their sound profile de-emphasizes treble, which makes details less clear, and their poor soundstage isn't immersive and spacious. They have no mic or in-line controls, but you can connect them to your console's controller or PC for latency-free audio.

Pros
  • Impressive noise isolation.
  • Durable build quality.
  • Stable and portable design.
Cons
  • No controls.
  • No microphone.
  • Soundstage isn't spacious and immersive.
2.6 Phone Calls

The Shure SE 215 don't have a microphone, so you can't use them for phone calls without a separate mic.

  • 6.8 Neutral Sound
  • 6.1 Commute/Travel
  • 6.4 Sports/Fitness
  • 6.0 Office
  • 4.1 Wireless Gaming
  • 6.1 Wired Gaming
  • 2.6 Phone Calls
  1. Updated Apr 12, 2024: This review's text was revisited with significant revisions throughout, aligning with our current standards and making it easier to compare to other reviews. No changes have been made to the scores.
  2. Updated Nov 01, 2021: Converted to Test Bench 1.5.
  3. Updated Feb 17, 2020: Converted to Test Bench 1.4.
  4. Updated Nov 21, 2019: Converted to Test Bench 1.3.1.
  5. Updated Nov 21, 2019: Converted to Test Bench 1.3.
  6. Updated Jun 27, 2018: Review published.
  7. Updated Jun 25, 2018: Our testers have started testing this product.
  8. Updated Jun 23, 2018: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  9. Updated Jun 13, 2018: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Shure SE215 come in several semi-translucent colorways, and our unit is the 'Black' variant. They also come in 'Clear,' 'Blue,' 'Green,' and 'Purple.' Some colors have changed or been discontinued over the years, like a solid black variant that's no longer available. The Shure SE215 PRO are virtually the same product, and sometimes their packaging doesn't even say 'PRO.' The main difference is that the 'PRO' variant comes with either a 3.83 ft or 5.33 ft cable rather than the 5 ft cable on our unit.

In addition, the brand produces a model with an in-line microphone and control module, the Shure AONIC 215, which comes with a larger case. There's also the Shure SE215 True Wireless Earphone Bundle Gen 2, which includes the same earbuds, adapters for Bluetooth audio, and a cable for wired listening.

The manufacturer offers a host of similar models that use the same basic earbud design and drivers. We expect these to perform similarly to our unit as they have the same '215' product codes and drivers, but we can't test for some features, like controls and microphone performance, that aren't on our standard SE215 unit.

If you encounter another variant of these headphones, let us know in the forums, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Headphones

The Shure SE215 are a straightforward wired-only design at the second lowest tier of the brand's IEM line-up. Their deep in-ear fit is fairly low profile and stable with over-ear cabling. They uniquely block more of your environmental surroundings than most headphones without active noise cancelling (ANC). However, their sound profile favors a more bass and mid-range forward sound, so if you want something with a more balanced sound, there are other options like the high-end MOONDROP Blessing 3. If you like the extra boominess but still want a more excited treble response, the TRUTHEAR x Crinacle ZERO are worth a look. The downsides of both are that they use more delicate two-pin connectors to the earbuds and don't block nearly as much environmental noise as the Shure.

See our recommendations for the best wired headphones, the best in-ear headphones, and the best headphones for music.

Sennheiser IE 200

The Sennheiser IE 200 offer a better-balanced sound than the Shure SE215. The Sennheiser follow our target curve more accurately. Although they have a dip in their treble range, this can be beneficial, as veiling vocals and instruments can help reduce ear fatigue. That said, you may still prefer the Shure if you want a warmer sound since they deliver more gusto when it comes to the high bass. Both buds are comfortable, though.

MOONDROP Aria

The MOONDROP Aria are better in-ear monitors than the Shure SE215. The MOONDROP are more comfortable and have a more neutral sound profile, which some users may prefer. However, the Shure are better-built, and they can isolate you from more ambient noise.

Shure SE425

The Shure SE215 and the Shure SE425 are very similar in design, but they have completely different sound profiles. The SE425 lack bass and over-emphasize frequencies in the mid and treble ranges, making them sound rather boxy and harsh. The SE215 sound significantly better-balanced in the mid-range but they lack detail and brightness, so they have a darker overall sound profile.

MOONDROP Blessing 3

The MOONDROP Blessing 3 are better IEMs than the Shure SE215. While both buds are equally comfortable and well-built, the MOONDROP are hybrid driver IEMs with a much more neutral sound profile, which some users may prefer. They also have a more stable in-ear fit. However, the Shure are strictly dynamic driver IEMs and can block out more background noise.

KZ AS10

The KZ AS10 are better-sounding headphones than the Shure SE215. They also look better and have a better build quality, thanks to the braided and replaceable cable. You can also find a variant of the KZ in an in-line remote and mic, which the Shure lacks. However, the Shure are more comfortable and offer slightly better noise isolation. The better sound quality and cheaper price make the KZ a better choice over the Shure.

KZ ZS10

The KZ ZS10 sound brighter with a slightly more balanced bass range than the Shure SE215 in-ears. The KZ have a slightly more premium-looking design. The Shure, on the other hand, have a slightly more comfortable fit and better noise isolation than the KZ. Their overall sound is warmer. However, while both headphones are well-built in-ears with no in-line remotes, the sound of the KZ makes them more versatile.

7HZ Timeless

The 7HZ Timeless are better in-ear monitors (IEMs) than the Shure SE215. The 7HZ have a planar magnetic transducer design that helps them reproduce a more thumpy and punchy bass. Overall, they have a more neutral sound profile, which some users may prefer, and they're more comfortable. That said, the Shure have a dynamic transducer design, are better built, and can block out more background noise as they have a double flange ear tip design.

MEE audio M6 PRO

The Shure SE215 and MEE audio M6 PRO are wired in-ear monitors with detachable cables that fit hooked over your ears. The Shure are slightly better built and feel more comfortable for long listening sessions. Their isolation performance is also great and will allow you to concentrate on your audio content. Sound-wise, they're warmer and boomier than the MEE but not as clear in the highs. On the other hand, the MEE have an in-line remote and an in-line microphone, which the Shure lack. Their sound profile is noticeably brighter, with a balanced bass and midrange. However, our MEE unit seemed to have a mismatch in phase.

Sennheiser IE 40 PRO

The Shure SE215 and Sennheiser IE 40 PRO are pretty similar in-ear headphones, but each are slightly better in different categories. The Shure are better built as their detachable cable isn't as loose as the Sennheiser, and the buds feel a bit better-made. Also, they fit better inside the ears, making them more comfortable and creating a better seal for excellent isolation. On the other hand, the Sennheiser have a better treble range reproduction, as the Shure have a broad dip that affects the detail and brightness of those frequencies. However, the Sennheiser have a significant lack of low bass.

1More Triple Driver

The 1More Triple Driver and the Shure SE215 are both reasonable choices for audiophiles, each with pros and cons. The Shure are much more comfortable for long listening sessions and are significantly more durable. However, their sound signature is rather dark, lacking detail and brightness. The 1More have a more present treble and stronger bass for a slightly more V-shaped sound profile. They also don't isolate as well as the Shure.

MOONDROP KATO

The MOONDROP KATO are better IEMs for neutral sound than the Shure SE215. While both headphones are comfortable and well-built, the MOONDROP have a more neutral sound profile, which some users may prefer, and their passive soundstage seems more open and spacious, although it's still small and sounds as if it's coming from inside your head. However, the Shure can isolate you from more ambient noise.

TRUTHEAR x Crinacle ZERO

The Shure SE215 and TRUTHEAR x Crinacle ZERO are in-ear monitors with over-ear cabling. The Shure use more sturdy MMCX connectors for the removable cable. They include six sets of ear tips, including three memory foam ones. These provide much better noise isolation. Their sound is warm with boomy and cluttered bass and mids. The TRUTHHEAR x Crinacle are similarly well made, but they use more delicate two-pin connectors to the buds. Their sound is an excited V-shape with more bass and treble emphasis. They don't isolate as much noise as the Shure.

Westone W40

The Westone W40 are better wired in-ears than the Shure SE215 if you want a mic and controls. Unlike the Shure, the Westone have a mic and in-line controls, making them a bit more versatile. The Westone also come with a better case and more accessories than the Shure. Their sound is very midrange-focused with a steep bass roll-off. On the upside, the Shure have a more balanced sound profile, although the treble is somewhat recessed. They also have a slightly better noise isolation performance, but it's dependent on the tip and fit in your ears. Both headphones have a similar performance for isolation and leakage.

Etymotic Research HF5

The Shure SE215 and Etymotic Research HF5 are both wired in-ears. The Shure have a more comfortable design with angled earbuds that better fit the contour of your ears. The Shure also have a warmer sound with a punchier bass. They also have a thicker, more durable, and detachable audio cable. On the other hand, the Etymotic isolate passively slightly better than the Shure. They also have a more lightweight and straightforward in-ear design that some may prefer over the thicker cables of the Shure.

Sennheiser HD1 In-Ear / Momentum In-Ear

The Sennheiser HD1 In-Ear/Momentum In-Ear are slightly better and more versatile headphones than the Shure SE215. The Shure have a better sound quality overall, and they're more comfortable thanks to the angled earbuds. They also have a much more durable build quality than the Momentum. However, the Sennheiser have an in-line remote, which provides control for iOS devices and has a microphone for taking calls, making them more versatile for everyday casual use. They also come with a better case than the Shure and have a slightly more compact design.

TIN Audio T2

If sound quality is your only or most important factor, the TIN Audio T2 are better headphones, but otherwise, the Shure SE215 are more comfortable, come with a nice case, are more stable, and isolate a lot more noise than the TIN. They also have a detachable cable like the TIN, and you can find third-party cables with an in-line remote and mic. However, they are more expensive than the TIN.

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Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Type In-ear
Enclosure Closed-Back
Wireless No
Transducer Dynamic

The Shure SE215 are made of semi-translucent plastic housings that come in a variety of colors. The wired IEMs fit with the flexible and detachable cable over your ears. They're reasonably discreet unless you choose a bright color from the options of 'Black,' 'Clear,' 'Green,' 'Blue,' and 'Purple.' This housing shape is very similar to other models by the manufacturer, like the Shure SE425. Similarly, the brand has reworked the same drivers and housings for the Shure SE215 PRO model, which is virtually the same as the standard version, and the true wireless version, the Shure AONIC 215 Gen 2.

7.5
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.06 lbs
Clamping Force
0 lbs

These IEMs have a comfortable in-ear fit. They include a total of six ear tip sizes to help you find the right fit in both silicone and memory foam. Their angled design helps to ensure a better fit for the contours of your ears. The invasive fit of IEMs can feel comfortable with the right ear tips, but it's also fatiguing after a long session. Their plastic housing is pretty lightweight, so they're not as heavy as the MOONDROP KATO, which have stainless steel buds.

0
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
No Controls
Ease Of Use No Controls
Feedback No Controls
Call/Music Control No
Volume Control No
Microphone Control No
Channel Mixing
No
Noise Cancelling Control No
Talk-Through
No
Additional Controls No

These don't come with any controls. However, the brand also makes a set with the same housings and drivers, the Shure AONIC 215, which includes a cable with in-line controls.

9.1
Design
Breathability
Avg.Temp.Difference 0.9 °C

Like most in-ear models, these headphones are very breathable and will not make you sweat more than usual, even during more strenuous activities. They have an over-ear cable design, with few points of contact with the top of your ear.

8.6
Design
Portability
L 2.0" (5.1 cm)
W 2.0" (5.1 cm)
H 1.5" (3.8 cm)
Volume 6.00 in³ (98.32 cm³)
Transmitter Required No

Like most IEMs, these are excellent for portability. They easily fit into your pockets and aren't a hassle to carry at all times. They also come with a zippered carrying case.

7.5
Design
Case
Type Soft case
L 4.2" (10.7 cm)
W 3.0" (7.6 cm)
H 1.0" (2.5 cm)
Volume 13.00 in³ (213.03 cm³)

These headphones come with a good soft canvas case instead of the hardshell one that comes with the Shure SE425. It's portable and protects the headphones from impacts and drops but will not shield them from water damage besides a couple of raindrops. It also adds a bit of bulk, but since it's a soft case, you can squeeze it into tight spaces.

8.0
Design
Build Quality

The Shure SE215 have very good build quality. Their plastic feels dense and sturdy. They have a thick and durable cable. The cable is also removable with sturdy MMCX connectors, which used to be relatively rare for in-ears that weren't flagships, but it's increasingly common. This extends the life of the earphones since you can always buy a replacement if the cable gets damaged by regular wear and tear. Unfortunately, no extra cables are provided in the box, which is somewhat disappointing. You can also check out the TIN Audio T3 or KZ AS10 if you want equally well-built in-ears with a slightly more unique look.

7.5
Design
Stability

These in-ear headphones have good stability. The wired in-ear fit goes fairly deep into your ear canal. If you choose the memory foam ear tips, they expand to hold the earbuds in place. Their cable is flexible and fits over the top of your ear—it's not stiff like the KZ ZSN. This makes them stable enough for sports and working out since they will rarely fall out of your ears unless you physically pull them out or the audio cable gets hooked on something.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • Shure SE215 Headphones
  • Audio cable
  • Earbud tips (x6)
  • Wax removal tool
  • Carrying case
  • Manuals

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
-0.43 dB
Treble Amount
-4.85 dB

Their sound profile is warm, with emphasized high bass and mids. They reproduce music with a prominent boom and attack on bass guitars and kick drums. Their mid-range can sound cluttered and muddy with complicated mixes containing a lot of rhythm guitars, keys, and lead guitars. However, as these are designed for monitoring audio, those are the important frequencies to hear in live circumstances. Through the high mids, they provide a more balanced sound for present vocals.

The mostly under-emphasized treble range results in darker vocals and cymbals without much harmonic detail. A peak in the low treble adds focus to sibilant sounds like S and T for clarity, although it's somewhat uneven sounding. The de-emphasized treble can help avoid premature fatigue when monitoring audio.

9.1
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
0.19 dB

The frequency response consistency is outstanding. Using one of the six pairs of ear tips will help you find a proper fit. Delivery of bass through treble is very consistent between wears and wearers for a predictable sound each time.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
8.1
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.71 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
16.34 Hz
Low-Bass
-2.33 dB
Mid-Bass
1.27 dB
High-Bass
4.25 dB

The Shure SE215 bass accuracy is great. While they lack a thumpy low bass, the mid-bass adds a touch of extra body to bass guitars and punch to kick drums. However, the high-bass, which is responsible for warmth, is overemphasized, making the bass boomy and muddy with busy mixes. If you're looking for IEMs with a more even and neutral bass range, check out the 7HZ Timeless.

8.4
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.07 dB
Low-Mid
3.2 dB
Mid-Mid
-0.79 dB
High-Mid
-0.02 dB

The Shure SE215's mid-range is great. The bump in the low-mid continues on from the exaggerated high-bass, making the overall mix sound cluttered where lead instruments and bass meet. However, the rest of the mids are more balanced, leading to present vocals and clear lead instruments in the higher mids.

6.0
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
5.79 dB
Low-Treble
-1.62 dB
Mid-Treble
-7.09 dB
High-Treble
-11.59 dB

Their treble performance is mediocre. The overall response is uneven throughout the range. The low treble is gently recessed, producing somewhat clear vocal harmonics. A narrow peak in the low-treble affects sibilant sounds (like S and T) and the attack on cymbals, making them sound relatively harsh. Most of the mid-treble strongly rolls off, dulling harmonics and details.

Overall, this is a warm treble response, especially with the emphasis on the high-bass and mids. The one advantage of this tuning is that for live situations, your ears don't tire quickly from bright frequencies, although it can lead to over-compensating by turning up treble on outboard equalizers.

7.4
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
1.65 dB
Dips
1.36 dB

Their peaks and dips performance is decent. A wide peak in the bass through low mids makes bass instruments sound punchy but can muddy the mix. A slight dip in the mids relieves a bit of muddiness by pushing the lead instruments down in the mix a bit. A peak in the high mids brings a focus to vocal presence. The dip in the low treble evens out the harmonics from getting piercing. A narrow peak in the low treble adds harsh clarity to cymbal hits and sibilant harmonics (like S and T). Following the sharp peak, most of the mid-treble dips dramatically for a dark and warm top-end.

9.3
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.08
Weighted Phase Mismatch
1.48
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
0.23
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
1.18

Their imaging performance is superb. The group delay is extremely even, and the phase response is below the audibility threshold. This ensures a tight bass and a transparent treble reproduction. Additionally, the L/R drivers of our unit are very well-matched, which is important for the accurate placement and localization of objects (instruments, voice, footsteps) in the stereo image. This performance aligns with other products we've tested by Shure, indicating fantastic ergonomics and quality control. Imaging varies between units, so these results are only valid for our unit.

0.4
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
N/A
PRTF Size (Avg.)
N/A
PRTF Distance
N/A
Openness
1.5
Acoustic Space Excitation
0.3

The soundstage on these headphones is bad. This is normal for in-ear fitting and closed-back designs because they don't interact with your environment's acoustics or your outer ears. As a result, your audio sounds like it's coming from inside your head rather than spaciously spread outside and in the room.

0
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
No
Speaker Modeling
No
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
No App
7.9
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.305
WHD @ 100
0.100

These have very good weighted harmonic distortion performance. There's virtually no distortion in the bass and most of the mid-range. There's some distortion present in the treble with a peak corresponding with the frequency response's peak in the low-treble to mid-treble transition and in the uppermost registers at the thresholds of human hearing, although it's low overall. By and large, your audio sounds clean and pure, representative of the source audio.

Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
No Firmware
Power
Passive
Connection
Wired
Codec
PCM, 24-bit, 48kHz
EQ
No EQ
ANC
No ANC
Tip/Pad
Silicone (small)
Microphone
No Microphone

These are the settings used for testing, and our results are only valid with these settings.

Isolation
8.3
Isolation
Noise Isolation
Isolation Audio
Overall Attenuation
-24.62 dB
Noise Cancelling No
Bass
-15.13 dB
Mid
-22.63 dB
Treble
-36.73 dB

The isolation performance of the Shure SE215 is impressive. Although these in-ears don't have an active noise cancelling (ANC) system, they provide an impressive amount of passive-only noise isolation. Unusually for passive-only headphones, they block bassy noises well, like the rumble of airplane and bus engines. They suppress ambient noise like chatter and traffic well while isolating piercing and sharp noises like the shrieking brakes of a subway or crash cymbals (if you use these in a live music context). However, a narrow band of boomy noises will still reach your ears.

9.8
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
22.36 dB

Their leakage performance is fantastic. Due to their deep in-ear fit, memory foam ear tips, and closed-back design, they barely leak sound. What escapes is audible as trebly and thin, mostly bright cymbals. The volume is quieter than most offices, so you won't bother your neighbors. Even if you listen at high volumes, the leakage is hard to hear. It's also unlikely a microphone will pick up a notable amount of leaked audio if you're tracking audio while wearing these IEMs.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
No
In-Line
No
Boom
No
Detachable Boom
No
Mic No

The Shure SE215 don't have a microphone. However, the Shure AONIC 215 variant uses the same earbuds with a different cable that comes with an in-line microphone.

0
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
N/A
LFE
N/A
FR Std. Dev.
N/A
HFE
N/A
Weighted THD
N/A
Gain
N/A
0
Microphone
Noise Handling
SpNR
N/A
Noise Gate
No
Speech + Pink Noise Handling
N/A
Speech + Pink Noise Audio Sample N/A
Speech + Subway Noise Handling
N/A
Speech + Subway Noise Audio Sample N/A
Active Features
0
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
No Battery
Continuous Battery Life
N/A
Additional Charges
N/A
Total Battery Life
N/A
Charge Time
N/A
Power-Saving Feature
No
Audio While Charging
No
Passive Playback
Passive Headphone
Charging Port None
0
Active Features
App Support
App Name No App
iOS No
Android No
macOS No
Windows No
Equalizer
No
ANC Control
No
Mic Control No
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
No
Button Mapping No
Surround Support
No
Connectivity
0
Connectivity
Bluetooth
Bluetooth Version
No Bluetooth
Multi-Device Pairing
No
NFC Pairing
No
Line Of Sight Range
N/A
PC Latency (SBC)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX HD)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX-LL)
N/A
iOS Latency
N/A
Android Latency
N/A

These are passive and wired-only. You can buy an adapter kit to make them truly wireless with Bluetooth capabilities by swapping out the detachable cable. The manufacturer also makes a variant, the SE215 True Wireless Earphone Bundle Gen 2, which includes Bluetooth adapters alongside a cable for wired listening.

0
Connectivity
Non-Bluetooth Wireless
Non-BT Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Non-BT Latency
N/A
9.5
Connectivity
Wired
Analog Audio
Yes
USB Audio
No
Detachable Yes
Length 5.00 ft (1.52 m)
Connection
1/8" TRS
Analog/USB Audio Latency
0 ms

The Shure SE215 use a 1/8" TRS audio cable with no in-line remote or mic. It connects to each earbud's housing via MMCX connectors. Our unit's cable is 5 ft (1.52m), but the otherwise identical Shure SE215 PRO's cable runs either 3.83 ft (1.17m) or 5.33 ft (1.63m).

Connectivity
PC Compatibility
Analog
Audio Only
Wired USB
No
Non-BT Wireless
No

You can connect these headphones via analog for full audio support, but they don't have a microphone. You'll need an outboard microphone to participate in online meetings.

Connectivity
PlayStation Compatibility
PS4 Analog
Audio Only
PS4 Wired USB
No
PS4 Non-BT Wireless
No
PS5 Analog
Audio Only
PS5 Wired USB
No
PS5 Non-BT Wireless
No

You can connect these headphones to your PlayStation's controller via analog for audio playback, although they don't have a microphone, so you can't chat with friends. The Shure AONIC 215 are virtually the same earbuds but with a different cable that includes a mic.

Connectivity
Xbox Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
Audio Only
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Non-BT Wireless
No
Xbox Series X|S Analog
Audio Only
Xbox Series X|S Wired USB
No
Xbox Series X|S Non-BT Wireless
No

You can connect these earbuds to your Xbox controller's output for audio support. However, they don't have a mic, so you can't chat with friends. The Shure AONIC 215 are the same earbuds with a different cable and include an in-line microphone.

0
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
No Base/Dock
USB Input
No
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
No
Power Supply
No Base/Dock