Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.4
Updated Apr 28, 2021 at 02:29 pm
Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless Picture
6.0
Mixed Usage
6.9
Neutral Sound
5.4
Commute/Travel
5.1
Sports/Fitness
6.1
Office
7.4
Wireless Gaming
7.7
Wired Gaming
6.8
Phone Calls
Type Over-ear
Enclosure Closed-Back
Wireless Yes
Noise Cancelling No
Mic Yes
Transducer Dynamic

The Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless are decent wireless gaming over-ears. They have Razer HyperSense built-in, which is a haptic feedback system that transmits vibrations or rumbles to the user that can help immerse you in your games. They're also comfortable and well-built. However, they're very prone to inconsistent audio delivery, and their five-hour battery life is very disappointing, especially as they can't be used passively since they need to be on, even when wired. On the upside, they have low wireless latency when used with their USB receiver. While their boom mic does an okay job of recording your voice, it can separate it from moderate noise around you.

Our Verdict

6.0 Mixed Usage

The Razer Nari Ultimate are mediocre for mixed usage. While their boom microphone is retractable, they're likely too large and bulky to be used more casually. They're good for gaming thanks to their comfortable design and decent overall mic performance. Unfortunately, they only last around 5 hours off a single charge. They also have an unstable fit, which makes them unsuitable for sports, and they don't block out much background noise either, which could be annoying during your commute or day at the office.

Pros
  • Well-built and comfortable.
  • Very low latency.
  • Graphic EQ and presets available.
Cons
  • Disappointingly short battery life.
  • Poor isolation performance.
  • Inconsistent audio delivery.
6.9 Neutral Sound

The Razer Nari Ultimate are fair for neutral sound. Their frequency response consistency is sub-par, so different people may experience their sound profile very differently. However, on average, they have a very bass-heavy sound profile that some users may find muddy. Their mid and treble ranges are much more neutral and accurate. However, due to their closed-back headphones, they don't have a very open or spacious soundstage.

Pros
  • Well-built and comfortable.
  • Graphic EQ and presets available.
Cons
  • Disappointingly short battery life.
  • Inconsistent audio delivery.
5.4 Commute/Travel

The Razer Nari Ultimate are disappointing for commute and travel. They don't block out much background noise, so they won't isolate the low engine rumbles from a bus or plane. They also have a very unstable fit and are very bulky, which makes them difficult to carry around without occupying a lot of space in a bag. They aren't the best for long travel days as their battery only lasts around five hours, and they can't be used passively.

Pros
  • Well-built and comfortable.
Cons
  • Disappointingly short battery life.
  • Poor isolation performance.
5.1 Sports/Fitness

The Razer Nari Ultimate aren't recommended for sports or fitness. These bulky over-ears don't have a stable fit and tend to slide all over with minimal movement. They’re also not very breathable, like most gaming headphones. They don't support Bluetooth either, so you can't use them wirelessly with your phone.

Pros
  • Well-built and comfortable.
Cons
  • Unstable fit prone to slipping off head.
  • Disappointingly short battery life.
  • Not very breathable.
6.1 Office

The Nari Ultimate are acceptable for office use. They're comfortable enough for long listening periods and can be used wirelessly with any PC. Unfortunately, they don’t isolate noise well so you can hear your coworkers chatting. Their 5-hour battery life may not be able to get you through long work days either. Luckily, you can use them while charging. They also have great customization options, though you have to install the Razer Synapse software to gain access to them, which some workplaces may not allow.

Pros
  • Well-built and comfortable.
  • Graphic EQ and presets available.
Cons
  • Disappointingly short battery life.
  • Poor isolation performance.
7.4 Wireless Gaming

The Razer Nari Ultimate are decent for wireless gaming. They’re fully compatible with PCs as well as PS4 and PS5 consoles when using the included wireless USB receiver. They have very low latency and are comfortable enough to wear for a while without causing too much fatigue. They have lots of customization options via the Razer Synapse app and their microphone offers decent overall performance. They have a very unstable fit, though, and need to be readjusted often, which is frustrating while gaming. Their 5-hour battery life is also poor, and you may need to plug them in to charge them after playing for a while, depending on your settings.

Pros
  • Unique haptic feedback system.
  • Well-built and comfortable.
  • Very low latency.
  • Graphic EQ and presets available.
Cons
  • Disappointingly short battery life.
  • Inconsistent audio delivery.
  • Not very breathable.
7.7 Wired Gaming

The Razer Nari Ultimate are good for wired gaming. They can be used on PC, PS4, PS5, Xbox One, or Xbox Series X consoles with full mic and audio compatibility by plugging them directly into your controller with the included 1/8" TRRS cable. The boom microphone does a great job at separating your voice from background noise. However, while your voice sounds decently clear and intelligible, it also sounds thin and lacking in brilliance.

Pros
  • Unique haptic feedback system.
  • Well-built and comfortable.
  • Graphic EQ and presets available.
Cons
  • Disappointingly short battery life.
  • Inconsistent audio delivery.
6.8 Phone Calls

The Razer Nari Ultimate are okay for phone calls. They have a decent boom microphone that does a great job of separating your voice from noisy environments, though your voice sounds thin and lacking in brilliance. They don't support Bluetooth and are quite bulky, so they may not be the best choice for taking calls on the go. However, they may be a good option if you make a lot of calls on your PC at home or work.

Pros
  • Well-built and comfortable.
  • Great noise handling.
Cons
  • Disappointingly short battery life.
  • Poor isolation performance.
  • 6.0 Mixed Usage
  • 6.9 Neutral Sound
  • 5.4 Commute/Travel
  • 5.1 Sports/Fitness
  • 6.1 Office
  • 7.4 Wireless Gaming
  • 7.7 Wired Gaming
  • 6.8 Phone Calls
  1. Updated Apr 28, 2021: Updated review for accuracy and clarity.
  2. Updated Feb 25, 2020: Test Bench 1.4.
  3. Updated Nov 21, 2019: Converted to Test Bench 1.3.1.
  4. Updated Nov 21, 2019: Converted to Test Bench 1.3.1.
  5. Updated Nov 21, 2019: Converted to Test Bench 1.3.

Check Price

Classic Black Nari Ultimate
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

Test Results

Design
Design
Style

The Razer Nari Ultimate have a very sleek look that's similar in design to the Razer Man O’ War Wireless but are more premium overall. They have large, circular ear cups with noticeably thick padding and an all-black color scheme with gunmetal accents. The mic is also retractable for a slightly more casual look. Like the Logitech G733 LIGHTSPEED Wireless, they have customizable RGB lighting on the ear cups.

7.5
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.9 lbs
Clamping Force
1.5 lbs

The Razer Nari Ultimate are comfortable headphones for most people. They have large, soft ear cups with lots of thick padding that fit well around the ears. The headband is coated in a more breathable mesh material and has less padding than the ear cups, but it's still comfortable. Although they clamp down quite a bit and start to feel tight and heavy after a while, they should be comfortable enough for long gaming sessions. These headphones feature Razer's HyperSense haptic feedback system, which creates vibrations to immerse you in your games. This may get tiring and uncomfortable during long sessions, though it can be easily turned off.

5.8
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
Not OS specific
Ease Of Use Okay
Feedback Decent
Call/Music Control No
Volume Control Yes
Microphone Control Mute/Unmute
Channel Mixing
Yes
Noise Cancelling Control No
Talk-Through
No
Additional Controls No

The Razer Nari Ultimate have disappointing controls, with physical buttons and scroll wheels on each ear cup. The control scheme is easy enough to use once you get the hang of it, but the power and mic muting buttons are very small and a bit challenging to locate at first. The volume and channel mixing dials are easy-to-use and fairly responsive, especially since the channel mixing dial has a notch in the middle to signal when the game and chat audio are at 50/50. There's also a dedicated mic mute button as well as a power on and off button.

5.6
Design
Breathability
Avg.Temp.Difference 7.8 °C

The Razer Nari Ultimate have sub-par breathability. They're less breathable than typical closed-back over-ear headphones as they have a tight fit and their thick padding blocks out airflow. As a result, they trap in heat, which can make your ears warm while wearing them for long gaming sessions. Your ears could also sweat more if you're wearing them during physical activity, as they're not designed for this purpose.

5.2
Design
Portability
L 8.7"
W 7.2"
H 4"
Volume 251 in³
Transmitter Required No

The Razer Nari Ultimate aren’t very portable headphones and are designed to leave at home with your gaming setup. They're among the largest headphones we have measured so far, and while their ear cups swivel, they don't come with a carrying case. They also don't support Bluetooth and require their transmitter to be used wirelessly. Luckily, they can be used wired with the included audio cable.

0
Design
Case
Type No case
L N/A
W N/A
H N/A
Volume N/A
7.5
Design
Build Quality

The Razer Nari Ultimate have a good build quality. They feel much better built than the Razer Man O’ War Wireless. They’re mostly made of dense and good quality plastic, with a metal headband frame that feels solid. However, they’re not very flexible, and the joint where the ear cups rotate feels like a potential weak point. They’re also quite heavy and might break if you drop them. The exposed audio cable shouldn’t be a problem but could see some damage over time. Although we don't currently test for it, they lack an IP rating for water resistance, too, which is to be expected from gaming headphones.

4.5
Design
Stability

The Razer Nari Ultimate have poor stability. They have an auto-adjusting headband that's quite comfortable but doesn’t provide enough stability for the headphones to rest securely on your head as it can readjust itself while you move. The headphones move around a lot when turning or tilting your head, and you may need to stop what you’re doing to readjust them. Consider the Razer Kaira Pro Wireless if you're looking for gaming headphones with a more stable fit.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • Razer Nari Ultimate headphones
  • Micro-USB to USB-A charging cable
  • 1/8" TRRS cable
  • USB dongle (inside headset)
  • Manuals

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
1.58 dB
Treble Amount
-4.06 dB

The Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless have a sound profile that depends on their fit, seal, and positioning on your head. These variables can all affect the headphones' audio delivery and result in inconsistent bass and treble. Our results are an average of various reseats, so your experience may vary. That said, they have a bass-heavy sound profile that delivers extra punch and boom to your audio, which can help bring out sound effects in your gameplay. If you prefer a different sound, their companion software offers a graphic EQ and presets to help customize their sound to your liking.

5.5
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
1.21 dB

The frequency response consistency of the Razer Nari Ultimate is disappointing. They're prone to both inconsistent bass and treble delivery, and their overall frequency response depends on the headphones' fit, seal, and positioning on your head. If you have thick hair or glasses, you may especially notice a drop in bass, as these features can break the ear cups' seal on your head. Once you achieve a good overall fit, you should get a more consistent frequency response each time you use them.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
5.9
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
5.73 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
10 Hz
Low-Bass
1.3 dB
Mid-Bass
6.23 dB
High-Bass
8.43 dB

The Razer Nari Ultimate have sub-par bass accuracy. Most of the range is quite over-emphasized, which adds extra thump, punch, and boom to your mixes. It can help emphasize sound effects in your gameplay, but some may find it sounds muddy.

It's worth noting that their bass delivery varies noticeably across users and is sensitive to the quality of the fit, seal, and whether you wear glasses. The response here represents the average bass response, and your experience may vary.

7.9
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.78 dB
Low-Mid
4.17 dB
Mid-Mid
0.24 dB
High-Mid
-0.72 dB

The mid-range accuracy of these headphones is very good. There's some overemphasis extending from the high-bass into the low-mids, which can make the fundamentals of vocals and lead instruments sound muddy. That said, the rest of the range is fairly flat and neutral, so vocals and lead instruments are present, detailed, and clear.

7.9
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.74 dB
Low-Treble
0.33 dB
Mid-Treble
-2.3 dB
High-Treble
-6.46 dB

The treble accuracy of the Razer Nari Ultimate is very good. The low-treble is flat and neutral, which results in clear and detailed vocals and lead instruments. However, a dip in the mid-treble dulls sibilants like S and T sounds.

Their treble delivery can vary depending on fit and positioning. The response here represents the average treble response, so your experience may vary.

7.4
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
1.75 dB
Dips
1.01 dB

The peaks and dips performance of the Razer Nari Ultimate are decent. The large peak in high-bass adds extra boom to your mixes, though some may find it sounds muddy. The dip throughout the mid-range weakens and nudges vocals and lead instruments to the back of the mix. A peak in the low-treble sharpens the upper harmonics of vocals and lead instruments while another peak in the mid-treble makes sibilants like cymbals piercing.

8.2
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.35
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
1.06
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
2.21
Weighted Phase Mismatch
4.38

The imaging performance of the Razer Nari Ultimate is great. The GD graph shows that the entire group delay response is below the audibility threshold, ensuring a tight bass and a transparent treble. Additionally, the left and right drivers of our unit are well-matched in amplitude, frequency, and phase response. This is important for the accurate localization and placement of objects (voices, instruments, video game effects) in the stereo field. However, it's worth noting that these results are only valid for our unit, and yours may perform differently.

6.2
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
2.35 dB
PRTF Size (Avg.)
4.46 dB
PRTF Distance
12.41 dB
Openness
4.6
Acoustic Space Excitation
4.4

The passive soundstage of the Razer Nari Ultimate is mediocre. It's perceived as large, natural-sounding, and as if coming from speakers placed around you, rather than as if sound is coming from inside your head. However, their closed-back design results in a soundstage that doesn't feel as open or spacious as that created by open-back headphones.

2.0
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
No
Speaker Modeling
On/Off
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
Yes

These headphones have a virtual surround feature, though we don't currently test its performance. If you're looking for a pair of Razer headphones with a little more customization in this department, the Razer Kraken Ultimate also have a virtual surround feature, but you can adjust its speaker modeling.

7.9
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.271
WHD @ 100
0.100

The weighted harmonic distortion of the Razer Nari Ultimate is very good. Although there are some peaks in the treble range when listening at a normal listening volume, it shouldn't be audible to all listeners. All frequencies otherwise fall within good limits, which should result in clear and pure audio reproduction.

Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
Unknown
Power
On
Connection
Wireless (Proprietary)
Codec
PCM, 24-bit, 48kHz
EQ
Default
ANC
No ANC
Tip/Pad
Default
Microphone
Boom

These are the settings used to test the Razer Nari Ultimate. Our results are only valid when using the headphones with these settings.

Isolation
5.3
Isolation
Noise Isolation
Isolation Audio
Overall Attenuation
-13.8 dB
Bass
-0.17 dB
Mid
-10.32 dB
Treble
-31.73 dB

The Razer Nari Ultimate have poor noise isolation performance. They don’t have active noise cancellation (ANC) and don't produce a tight enough seal to isolate at all in the bass range. As a result, they let in all the rumble of airplane and bus engines. They're only passable at reducing background chatter, so they may not be the best option to keep you concentrated in the office, either. On the upside, they do a much better job at reducing high-pitched noise like the hum of an A/C system.

6.2
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
44.1 dB

The Razer Nari Ultimate have mediocre leakage performance. The leakage is relatively full-sounding compared to that of in-ears and earbuds. The overall level of the leakage is just above the noise level of most offices, so those right next to you may hear some of your music at louder volumes.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
No
In-Line
No
Boom
Yes
Detachable Boom
No
6.9
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
LFE
522.85 Hz
FR Std. Dev.
2.15 dB
HFE
5,664.61 Hz
Weighted THD
0.104
Gain
29.12 dB

The recording quality of the microphone is alright. When using the mic, your voice is detailed and understandable, though it sounds relatively thin and lacks a bit of airiness and brilliance.

8.0
Microphone
Noise Handling
Speech + Pink Noise
Speech + Subway Noise
SpNR
27.95 dB

The Razer Nari Ultimate’s boom microphone has great noise handling. Even in noisy environments, your teammates should be able to hear you fairly clearly.

Active Features
5.2
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
Rechargable
Continuous Battery Life
5.3 hrs
Additional Charges
0.0
Total Battery Life
5.3 hrs
Charge Time
2.9 hrs
Power-Saving Feature
No
Audio While Charging
Yes
Passive Playback
No
Charging Port micro-USB

The Razer Nari Ultimate have disappointing battery performance. With haptic feedback set at 50% and RGB lighting on, the headphones last slightly over 5 hours, which is far less than the 8 hours of battery life advertised by Razer. While we expect better performance with the haptic feedback and RGB lighting disabled, battery performance can vary depending on usage, so your real-world experience may be different. That said, they take nearly three hours to charge, which is sub-par, but fortunately, the Nari provide audio while charging.

8.5
Active Features
App Support
App Name Razer Synapse
iOS No
Android No
macOS No
Windows Yes
Equalizer
Graphic + Presets
ANC Control
No
Mic Control Adjustable Level
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
No
Button Mapping No
Surround Support
Yes

The Razer Nari Ultimate are compatible with Razer's excellent Synapse software, which offers many customization features. You can adjust the level of haptic feedback, customize the sound of the headphones using the graphic EQ or presets, set the Chroma lighting, and more. The only downside is you need to create an account and register with Razer to use their software.

Connectivity
0
Connectivity
Bluetooth
Bluetooth Version
No Bluetooth
Multi-Device Pairing
No
NFC Pairing
No
Line Of Sight Range
N/A
PC Latency (SBC)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX HD)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX-LL)
N/A
iOS Latency
N/A
Android Latency
N/A

The Razer Nari Ultimate aren't Bluetooth compatible. If you want a gaming headset with Bluetooth support, check out the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless or the Turtle Beach Stealth 700 Wireless.

8.8
Connectivity
Non-Bluetooth Wireless
Non-BT Line Of Sight Range
131 ft
Non-BT Latency
23 ms

The Razer Nari Ultimate have excellent non-Bluetooth wireless connectivity. They have very low latency when used with their USB receiver, which makes them a suitable option for gaming and watching movies. You shouldn't notice any issue with audio syncing.

9.5
Connectivity
Wired
Analog Audio
Yes
USB Audio
No
Detachable Yes
Length 4.4 ft
Connection 1/8" TRRS
Analog/USB Audio Latency
0 ms

The Razer Nari Ultimate can be used wired with the included 1/8" TRRS audio cable. However, they need to be powered on to work. These headphones also come with a micro-USB to USB-A cable that can be used to charge the headphones.

Connectivity
PC / PS4 Compatibility
PC/PS4 Analog
Audio + Microphone
PC/PS4 Wired USB
No
PC/PS4 Non-BT Wireless
Audio + Microphone

These headphones are fully compatible with PC, PS4, and PS5 consoles. They can be used wirelessly with their USB dongle or wired by plugging their 1/8" TRRS cable into your PC, or into either a PS4 or PS5 controller.

Connectivity
Xbox One Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
Audio + Microphone
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Non-BT Wireless
No

The Razer Nari Ultimate can be used with Xbox One and Xbox Series X consoles by plugging them directly into your controller with the included 1/8" TRRS cable, which gives you full audio and microphone compatibility.

3.4
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
Wireless USB Dongle
USB Input
Yes
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
No
Power Supply
USB

The Razer Nari Ultimate come with a small USB dongle. It doesn't have any additional inputs and it doesn't charge the headphones. The dongle is compatible with PCs as well as PS4 and PS5 consoles but not the Xbox One or Xbox Series X consoles. If you’re looking for a gaming headset with a charging dock that’s compatible with the Xbox One, check out the Astro A50 Gen 3 Wireless 2017.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Razer Nari Ultimate come in one color variant: 'Classic Black'. These headphones also come in an Xbox One variant, which has a 'Classic Black/Green' color scheme. This variant has Xbox Wireless technology so that you can game wirelessly with Xbox consoles. Although we haven't tested this variant, it should perform similarly to our model in most regards.

If you come across another variant of these headphones, please let us know in the discussions, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Headphones

Comparison picture

The Razer Nari Ultimate are decent wireless gaming headphones that set themselves apart with their unique haptic feedback feature and RGB lighting. Though they're quite comfortable and well-built, they’re also significantly bulkier and less stable than most gaming headphones.

If you’re looking for gaming headphones and want to see a greater variety of fit options, check out our recommendations for the best wireless gaming headsets, and the best gaming headsets for PC, PS4, and Xbox One.

Razer BlackShark V2 Pro Wireless

The Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless and the Razer BlackShark V2 Pro Wireless have different strengths and depending on your usage, you may prefer one over the other. The Nari Ultimate are better-built, their mic has a better recording quality, and they have a unique haptic feedback feature, which some users may prefer. However, the BlackShark V2 Pro have more consistent audio delivery, and their mic delivers better noise handling. They also have a better battery performance.

Razer Kraken Ultimate

The Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless are better performing gaming headphones than the Razer Kraken Ultimate. The Nari Ultimate can be used wired as well as wirelessly, they're slightly more comfortable, and they have a more bass-heavy sound that some gamers may prefer. They're also compatible with the Xbox One via their analog cable. However, they don't have the longest-lasting battery, especially when compared to other gaming headphones. The Kraken Ultimate, on the other hand, have an adjustable surround sound feature, and their boom microphone performs better overall. Since they're wired, you don't have to worry about battery life, either.

SteelSeries Arctis 9X Wireless

The SteelSeries Arctis 9X Wireless are better overall gaming headphones than the Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless, especially if you game exclusively on the Xbox One. The SteelSeries have better controls, they're more stable, and they leak less audio. Their boom microphone also performs better and their continuous battery life is much higher than the Razer's 5.3 hours. They support Bluetooth as well as Xbox Wireless too, which is nice if you like to chat with your friends using your mobile device while you game. 

SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless

The SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless are much better gaming headphones than the Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless. While the SteelSeries and Razer both have an inconsistent sound across users, the SteelSeries offer an EQ directly on their wireless transmitter so you can customize sound on-the-fly. The SteelSeries also have a much better performing microphone, and superior battery performance thanks to their two interchangeable battery packs. The SteelSeries also support Bluetooth for added compatibility with mobile devices. However, the Razer have access to a wider range of customization options with the Razer Synapse program, like haptic feedback and Chroma lighting control.

Razer Kaira Pro Wireless

The Razer Kaira Pro Wireless are more versatile than the Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless. The Kaira Pro are Bluetooth-compatible, have a more stable fit, a more comprehensive control scheme, and are better-built. They also have almost four times the battery life and a superior boom microphone. That said, the Nari can be used on a wired connection via their 1/8" TRRS cable and have a slightly better-balanced sound profile out-of-the-box.

Logitech G933 Wireless Gaming Headset

The Logitech G933 Wireless Gaming Headset are slightly better gaming headphones than the Razer Nari Ultimate. The Logitechs control scheme provides much better feedback, is easier to use, and features 3 mappable buttons for great customizability. They also have a better microphone and a longer-lasting battery. On the other hand, the Razer have better isolation performance, lower latency, and greater wireless range.

Beats Solo Pro Wireless

The Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless are better for gaming than the Beats Solo Pro Wireless. The Razer are more comfortable, and their mic has a much better overall performance. They have a more bass-heavy default sound profile that some listeners may prefer, and unlike the Beats, their companion software gives you access to a graphic EQ and presets. You can use them either wirelessly or with a wired connection. On the other hand, the Beats are Bluetooth-only headphones with much longer continuous battery life. They have an ANC feature with an impressive performance and onboard controls that are easier to use.

SteelSeries Arctis 7 2019 Edition Wireless

The SteelSeries Arctis 7 2019 Edition Wireless are better wireless gaming headphones than the Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless. While the Razer have a unique haptic feedback feature that can immerse you in your game, their battery lasts barely over five hours, which is quite disappointing. The SteelSeries have a much longer battery life, a better microphone, easier-to-use controls, and feel more durable.

Astro A50 Gen 4 Wireless 2019

The Astro A50 Gen 4 Wireless 2019 are way better wireless gaming headphones than the Razer Nari Ultimate Wireless. The Astro are more comfortable, better-built, have a longer battery life, and a better overall microphone performance. On the other hand, the Razer provide bass haptic feedback, which some users may prefer.

Razer Man O’ War Wireless

The Razer Nari Ultimate are better gaming headphones than the Razer Man O’ War Wireless. The Nari Ultimate are more comfortable and have significantly better build quality. They have a better wireless range and less latency, and can also be used wired with the Xbox One. However, the Man O’ War have a much better overall microphone performance and battery life. They also have a more stable fit and are less likely to slip off your head while gaming.

SteelSeries Arctis 7 Wireless 2017

The SteelSeries Arctis 7 Wireless 2017 are much better gaming headphones than the Razer Nari Ultimate. The SteelSeries have a better control scheme and a much more stable fit. They also have a better-balanced sound profile out-of-the-box, which some users may prefer, and a significantly better microphone. Their battery lasts longer, too. However, the Razer have a bit longer wireless range and haptic feedback.

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