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Sony A95K OLED TV Review

Tested using Methodology v1.8
Updated Sep 09, 2022 at 01:44 pm
Sony A95K OLED Picture
9.0
Mixed Usage
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung S95B OLED
9.4
Movies
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung S95B OLED
8.4
TV Shows
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung QN85A QLED
8.7
Sports
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung S95B OLED
9.2
Video Games
Value for price beaten by
: LG C2 OLED
9.1
HDR Movies
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung S95B OLED
9.1
HDR Gaming
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung S95B OLED
9.0
PC Monitor
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung S95B OLED
Type OLED
Sub-Type
QD-OLED
Resolution 4k

The Sony A95K OLED is a flagship 4k TV in Sony's 2022 lineup, sitting above the Sony A90K OLED and the Sony A80K OLED. It's their first QD-OLED TV, which is a type of OLED panel that features new technology to improve on traditional OLED TVs. It's one of the first QD-OLED displays available at the consumer level in 2022, alongside the Samsung S95B OLED. It uses a blue OLED panel with quantum dot filters that's supposed to combine the perfect black levels of OLEDs with the wide range of colors and bright highlights of QLED TVs. As it's a high-end TV, it's packed with features, like HDMI 2.1 bandwidth and variable refresh rate (VRR) support for gamers. Its Google TV interface is user-friendly, and it comes with the BRAVIA webcam that adds a few new features, like gesture support if you don't want to use the remote to navigate the menu.

Our Verdict

9.0 Mixed Usage

The Sony A95K is an incredible TV for most uses. It looks remarkable in dark rooms because it displays deep blacks without any blooming around bright objects, and HDR content looks remarkable thanks to its vivid colors and bright highlights with near-perfect tone mapping. It's impressive for watching TV shows and excellent for watching sports in well-lit rooms because it has incredible reflection handling, but any bright light source also causes the black levels to raise. It's incredible for gaming as it has a near-instantaneous response time, variable refresh rate (VRR) support, and HDMI 2.1 bandwidth. Even though its input lag is higher than other TVs, it's still low enough for gaming.

Pros
  • Perfect black levels.
  • No blooming around bright objects.
  • Wide viewing angle.
  • Near-perfect tone mapping.
  • Bright highlights and vivid colors.
Cons
  • SDR brightness is just okay.
  • Ambient light causes black levels to raise.
9.4 Movies

The Sony A95K is remarkable for watching movies in dark rooms. It displays deep blacks in dark rooms, and there isn't any blooming around bright objects either, thanks to its perfect black uniformity. It removes 24p judder from any source, which helps with the appearance of motion, and it doesn't have any issues upscaling lower-resolution content like from DVDs or Blu-rays.

Pros
  • Perfect black levels.
  • No blooming around bright objects.
  • Removes 24p judder from any source.
  • No issues with upscaling content.
Cons
  • Stutter with low-frame-rate content.
8.4 TV Shows

The Sony A95K is impressive for watching TV shows in bright rooms. It has incredible reflection handling that reduces glare from bright light sources, and although it doesn't get very bright in SDR, the TV still performs well in bright rooms. However, any ambient light causes the black levels to raise, which makes blacks look purple if you watch shows with dark scenes. It's also a great TV for wide seating areas as it has a wide viewing angle that makes the image look consistent from the sides.

Pros
  • No issues with upscaling content.
  • Incredible reflection handling.
  • Wide viewing angle.
Cons
  • SDR brightness is just okay.
  • Ambient light causes black levels to raise.
8.7 Sports

The Sony A95K is excellent for watching sports. It's ideal for watching the game with a large group of friends as it has a wide viewing angle that makes the image look the same from the sides. It also has incredible reflection handling if you want to use it in a well-lit room, but doing so causes the black levels to raise, which isn't much of an issue for most sports anyways. Lastly, it has remarkable motion handling that makes fast-moving balls and players look smooth without any motion blur.

Pros
  • No issues with upscaling content.
  • Incredible reflection handling.
  • Wide viewing angle.
  • Fantastic motion handling.
Cons
  • SDR brightness is just okay.
  • Ambient light causes black levels to raise.
9.2 Video Games

The Sony A95K is incredible for gaming. Its near-instantaneous response time makes motion look smooth, and while its input lag is higher than other premium TVs, it's still low enough for a responsive gaming feel. It also has HDMI 2.1 bandwidth and VRR support that make it fully compatible with the PS5 and Xbox Series X. It's even a fantastic choice for dark room gaming because it displays perfect blacks without any blooming.

Pros
  • Perfect black levels.
  • No blooming around bright objects.
  • Fantastic motion handling.
  • HDMI 2.1 bandwidth and VRR support.
Cons
  • Ambient light causes black levels to raise.
9.1 HDR Movies

The Sony A95K is remarkable for watching HDR content. It displays a wide range of colors in HDR and displays them nearly perfectly thanks to its outstanding tone mapping, which means it preserves details and makes images look life-like. It also gets bright enough to make colors look vivid and highlights pop. It has a near-infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity, meaning dark scenes are displayed perfectly without any blooming.

Pros
  • Perfect black levels.
  • No blooming around bright objects.
  • Near-perfect tone mapping.
  • Bright highlights and vivid colors.
Cons
9.1 HDR Gaming

The Sony A95K is fantastic for HDR gaming. It has a bunch of gaming features like a 120Hz panel, VRR support, and HDMI 2.1 bandwidth that make it ideal for console gaming. Motion looks smooth, and the TV has low input lag, but it's higher than some other TVs. In terms of HDR, it looks remarkable as highlights pop and colors look vivid, and it also displays deep blacks without any blooming around bright objects.

Pros
  • Perfect black levels.
  • Fantastic motion handling.
  • HDMI 2.1 bandwidth and VRR support.
  • Near-perfect tone mapping.
  • Bright highlights and vivid colors.
Cons
  • Ambient light causes black levels to raise.
  • Dolby Vision limited to 4k @ 60Hz.
9.0 PC Monitor

The Sony A95K is fantastic for PC gaming. It has HDMI 2.1 bandwidth and a 120Hz panel that allows you to play 4k games with a high frame rate, and it has a fast response time with low enough input lag. However, it isn't ideal for doing other computer tasks like productivity or browsing through the web because it has some text clarity issues and color fringing when you have multiple windows open.

Pros
  • Incredible reflection handling.
  • Wide viewing angle.
  • Fantastic motion handling.
  • HDMI 2.1 bandwidth and VRR support.
Cons
  • SDR brightness is just okay.
  • Ambient light causes black levels to raise.
  • Text clarity issues and color fringing.
  • 9.0 Mixed Usage
  • 9.4 Movies
  • 8.4 TV Shows
  • 8.7 Sports
  • 9.2 Video Games
  • 9.1 HDR Movies
  • 9.1 HDR Gaming
  • 9.0 PC Monitor
  1. Updated Sep 09, 2022: We added a note that the white balance difference is somewhat expected, as Sony targets a different white point when calibrating their displays at the factory.
  2. Updated Sep 07, 2022: Review published.
  3. Updated Aug 31, 2022: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved No

The frame of the Sony A95K is similar to other Sony TVs, but it has a unique stand that lets it sit flat against the table and hides the stand behind the display. It also comes with a detachable camera that sits on top of the TV.

Design
Stand

The Sony A95K has a unique stand that puts the TV completely in front and hides the stand, and is called the 'Front' position. This makes the display sit flush against the table. If you don't like that, there's an alternate position that puts the stand in front, as you can see here, which Sony calls the 'Back' position because the screen is in the back. The stand also includes pieces that you can take off to make it easier to hold if you need to carry the TV. Unfortunately, placing a soundbar in front of the TV in either position blocks the screen.

Footprint of the 65-inch TV:

  • In the standard position (Front): 56.7" x 11.9"
  • In the alternate position (Back): 56.7" x 11.2"

Design
Back
Wall Mount VESA 300x300

The back of the TV features textured plastic with a checkerboard pattern that's typical of Sony TVs. The inputs can be difficult to reach if you wall-mount it, especially if you use the input covers. The back includes covers for cable management, including two covers for part of the stand, and unlike the Sony X95K, they stay in place well.

Design
Borders
Borders 0.30" (0.8 cm)

The top and side bezels are thinner than the bottom bezel, which is about one inch thick.

Design
Thickness
Max Thickness 1.69" (4.3 cm)

With the Sony A95K in the 'Front' stand position, it leans back about three degrees, so if that bothers you, then you can use the alternate 'Back' position where the TV doesn't noticeably lean back.

9.0
Design
Build Quality

The Sony A95K has fantastic build quality. The entire unit is well put together as it's solid, and there aren't any noticeable issues. The base of the stand is metal covered in plastic, and the borders of the display are also metal, while everything else is premium plastic. The frame of the display is solid and doesn't feel like it would break like with the Samsung S95B OLED. The stand is also very solid, as it's heavy and there's minimal wobble. The downside is that the plastic in the back panel flexes easily, but this isn't a problem unless you're pressing against it.

Picture Quality
10
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
Inf : 1
Contrast with local dimming
N/A

The Sony A95K has a QD-OLED panel, which is a type of OLED panel, and it has a near-infinite contrast ratio, so it displays perfect blacks next to bright objects in dark rooms. However, because it lacks a polarizing layer, the black levels raise when there's a bright source on the screen, so blacks look closer to purple, which is typical of QD-OLEDs like the Samsung S95B OLED.

6.5
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene Peak Brightness
275 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
412 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
410 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
409 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
302 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
152 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
408 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
407 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
402 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
295 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
148 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.066

The Sony A95K has okay SDR peak brightness, but it isn't as bright overall as the Samsung S95B OLED, despite using heatsink technology. It means it isn't as ideal to use in a well-lit room, but considering the raised black level issue in well-lit rooms, it's better to use this in a dark or dim room anyways. It also has an aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL) that causes larger areas of bright colors to appear dimmer, which can be problematic while watching sports like hockey or basketball. Also, the SDR brightness dims over time, notably in Game Mode. If you leave a static image on the screen while gaming, the brightness drops about 30-40 nits after a few minutes, but it isn't noticeable, and it isn't an issue if the content on the screen is constantly changing.

These results are in the 'Custom' Picture Mode after calibration with the Brightness at its max, Contrast at its default of '90', Color Temperature set to 'Expert 1', and Peak Luminance on 'High'. Calibrating it doesn't do much to change the peak brightness. The Peak Luminance setting helps make the TV brighter, but it also causes the variation in brightness, so if you choose to disable it, there isn't any ABL, but the screen is a lot dimmer:

  • Peak 2% Window: 125 cd/m²
  • Peak 10% Window: 124 cd/m²
  • Peak 25% Window: 124 cd/m²
  • Peak 50% Window: 124 cd/m²
  • Peak 100% Window: 125 cd/m²
  • Sustained 2% Window: 125 cd/m²
  • Sustained 10% Window: 123 cd/m²
  • Sustained 25% Window: 122 cd/m²
  • Sustained 50% Window: 122 cd/m²
  • Sustained 100% Window: 122 cd/m²

If you want the brightest image possible and don't care about accuracy, then use the 'Vivid' Picture Mode with the Brightness and Contrast at their max, Advanced Contrast Enhancer, Black Adjust, Peak Luminance, and Live Color each on 'High', and the Color Temperature on 'Cool'. This results in a brightness of 773 cd/m² in the 2% window.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

The Sony A95K doesn't have a backlight, but thanks to its near-infinite contrast ratio, it's equivalent to a perfect local dimming feature. We still film these videos on the TV so you can see how the screen performs and compare it with a TV that has local dimming.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming In Game Mode
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

The Sony A95K doesn't have a backlight, but thanks to its near-infinite contrast ratio, it's equivalent to a perfect local dimming feature. We still film these videos on the TV so you can see how the screen performs and compare it with a TV that has local dimming.

8.2
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
Hallway Lights (~1950 cd/m²)
743 cd/m²
Yellow Skyscraper (~700 cd/m²)
592 cd/m²
Landscape Pool (~300 cd/m²)
265 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
983 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
977 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
509 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
273 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
193 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
969 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
958 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
464 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
258 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
189 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.107

The Sony A95K has great HDR peak brightness. Highlights pop, and it delivers an impactful HDR image. These results are in the 'Custom' HDR Picture Mode with the Brightness at its max, Contrast at its default of '90', Color Temperature set to 'Expert 2', and HDR Tone Mapping on 'Gradation Preferred'.

Although it's dimmer than the Samsung S95B OLED in our tests, the two TVs are very similar, and the brightness also depends on the content. However, the Samsung is slightly brighter overall because it focuses on brightness over accuracy.

Our HDR tests use HDR10, which is the basic HDR format that uses static metadata. However, the Sony model supports the more advanced Dolby Vision format, and there are two Dolby Vision picture modes: 'Dolby Vision Bright' and 'Dolby Vision Dark'. Using the 'Wheel Of Time' on Amazon Prime Video, we measured highlights in different scenes with both modes. As you can see, the brightest setting is 'Dolby Vision Bright' and still retains shadow details well and looks accurate, but 'Dolby Vision Dark' is also a good choice if you don't need the brightest highlights.

SceneDV BrightDV Dark
Medium highlight in dark215 cd/m²138 cd/m²
Small highlight in dark218 cd/m²149 cd/m²
Medium highlight in moderately-lit scene292 cd/m²206 cd/m²
Medium highlight in bright scene495 cd/m²310 cd/m²

When looking at the A95K and S95B side-by-side, 'Dolby Vision Dark' on the Sony looks very similar to the S95B, but 'Dolby Vision Bright' produces a visibly brighter and more impactful image. Also, tone mapping is better on the Sony as there's black crush and lost details on the Samsung. Because of this, the Sony TV has the advantage with HDR content, even if the Samsung TV can display slightly brighter highlights.

7.6
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness In Game Mode
Hallway Lights (~1950 cd/m²)
563 cd/m²
Yellow Skyscraper (~700 cd/m²)
593 cd/m²
Landscape Pool (~300 cd/m²)
192 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
940 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
955 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
490 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
260 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
169 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
931 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
934 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
448 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
246 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
167 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.112

The Sony A95K has good HDR brightness in Game Mode. It looks dimmer in Game Mode, but it's still bright enough for an impactful HDR gaming experience. The results are with the same settings as outside of Game Mode, but with the Picture Mode set to 'Game'.

9.8
Picture Quality
PQ EOTF Tracking
600 Nit Tracking Delta
0.0012
1000 Nit Tracking Delta
0.0012
4000 Nit Tracking Delta
0.0011

The Sony A95K has incredible PQ EOTF tracking. It displays content at their correct brightness up until the peak brightness, but as there's a sharp roll-off, bright details are lost. If you find the image too dim, you can set the Contrast to its max, HDR Tone Mapping to 'Brightness Preferred', and Advanced Contrast Enhancer and Peak Luminance on 'High'. This results in a brighter image, as you can see in this EOTF, but it doesn't change the peak luminance.

The TV was tested with HDR Tone Mapping set to 'Gradation Preferred'. This makes the TV track the EOTF well, but setting it to 'Brightness Preferred' or disabling it both make the image appear brighter.

8.9
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
0.972%
50% DSE
0.115%
5% Std. Dev.
0.306%
5% DSE
0.080%

The Sony A95K has amazing gray uniformity. The screen is uniform throughout, and there's minimal dirty screen effect in the center. Like with any OLED, there are faint vertical lines in near-dark scenes, but you only see them if you sit close and look for them.

10
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
0.157%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

The Sony A95K has perfect black uniformity as there isn't any blooming around bright objects.

10
Picture Quality
Viewing Angle
Color Washout
70°
Color Shift
70°
Brightness Loss
70°
Black Level Raise
70°
Gamma Shift
70°

The Sony A95K has an outstanding viewing angle. Although it isn't perfect, you won't have any issues using it in a wide seating area as people viewing it from the side see the same image as in front.

9.5
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Glossy
Total Reflections
1.1%
Indirect Reflections
0.6%
Calculated Direct Reflections
0.4%

The Sony A95K has incredible reflection handling as it minimizes glare from bright light sources very well. However, any ambient light also causes the black levels to raise, meaning blacks look closer to purple. It's best to avoid placing it in a bright room if you want to see perfect black levels. You can see an example of it with the LG G2 OLED next to the Samsung S95B OLED here, or with the Dell Alienware AW3423DW monitor here.

7.7
Picture Quality
Pre Calibration
White Balance dE
3.78
Color dE
1.62
Gamma
2.17
Color Temperature
6,841 K
Picture Mode
Custom
Color Temp Setting
Expert 1
Gamma Setting
0

The Sony A95K has good out-of-the-box accuracy in SDR. Although most colors are accurate, the white balance is off, particularly with brighter shades of gray. It's somewhat expected, as instead of the most common D65 white point, Sony targets an alternate white point at the factory. For consistency across our TV reviews, pre-calibration accuracy is always measured with the D65 white point instead of the Judd alternate white point, as it's the most common calibration target. Still, gamma is nearly spot-on with our 2.2 target for moderately-lit rooms, and the color temperature is also close to the 6500K target.

9.6
Picture Quality
Post Calibration
White Balance dE
0.21
Color dE
0.69
Gamma
2.20
Color Temperature
6,511 K
White Balance Calibration
10 point
Color Calibration
Yes

The Sony A95K has fantastic accuracy after calibration to the D65 white point. We warmed the TV up for 120 hours before calibrating and testing it, and it's easy to calibrate. Since the colors are already accurate before calibration, we only had to slightly adjust them. The white balance is much better, and both gamma and the color temperature are spot-on with the targets.

You can see the full settings for our calibration here.

8.0
Picture Quality
480p Input

The Sony A95K upscales 480p content from DVDs or SD cable channels very well.

8.0
Picture Quality
720p Input

720p content looks great, which is important if you watch content from HD cable channels.

9.0
Picture Quality
1080p Input

1080p content from Blu-rays looks almost as good as native 4k content.

10
Picture Quality
4k Input

The Sony A95K doesn't have any issues displaying native 4k content.

0
Picture Quality
8k Input

The Sony A95K is a 4k TV that can't display an 8k input.

Picture Quality
Pixels
Subpixel Layout
Triangular RGB

The QD-OLED panel on the Sony A95K uses a unique subpixel structure. Unlike most TVs, the pixels aren't in a row, and instead, they form a triangular shape, with the green pixel on top and the red and blue pixels on the bottom. It results in some color fringing when displaying content with black bars on the top and bottom, as you'll see a thin green line at the top and a thin red line at the bottom, but they aren't noticeable if you sit far anyways. The subpixel structure isn't ideal for PC use as it causes some issues with the text clarity, which you can learn more about in the Dell Alienware AW3423DW review. Windows ClearType can't correct it, but there are workarounds like using third-party software to improve text clarity or increase the scaling. Also, you'll only notice these text clarity issues if you sit close, but as it's only available in 55 and 65 inches, you should sit far away enough that they aren't visible.

You can see alternate pixel photos below:

9.4
Picture Quality
Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI P3 xy
100.00%
DCI P3 uv
100.00%
Rec 2020 xy
86.34%
Rec 2020 uv
91.28%

The Sony A95K has an exceptional HDR color gamut with remarkable tone mapping. It displays colors nearly perfectly in the commonly-used DCI-P3 color space, meaning images look life-like, and it preserves details well. It's a clear advantage over the Samsung S95B OLED as details aren't lost in dark areas, and this is due to the way that Sony focuses accuracy over brightness with this TV. It's also future-proof because it has excellent coverage of the wider Rec. 2020 color space that's going to be used in more and more HDR content, and the tone mapping is also fantastic.

This was tested with the HDR Tone Mapping setting on 'Gradation Preferred'. The 'Brightness Preferred' setting performs about the same, but tone mapping is much worse with the setting disabled, as you can see below:

Brightness PreferredDCI-P3Rec. 2020
OffDCI-P3Rec. 2020

9.0
Picture Quality
Color Volume
1,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage ITP
93.7%
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
50.5%
White Luminance
813 cd/m²
Red Luminance
190 cd/m²
Green Luminance
606 cd/m²
Blue Luminance
56 cd/m²
Cyan Luminance
655 cd/m²
Magenta Luminance
239 cd/m²
Yellow Luminance
778 cd/m²

The Sony A95K has remarkable HDR color volume. It's very similar to the Samsung S95B OLED, but some colors, like pure white, aren't as bright, while others, like cyan and yellow, are brighter. It's better than most TVs on the market as it displays colors at a wide range of luminance levels.

9.8
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit
Red (Std. Dev.)
0.047
Green (Std. Dev.)
0.043
Blue (Std. Dev.)
0.036
Gray (Std. Dev.)
0.033

The Sony A95K has outstanding gradient handling. There's hardly any banding with most colors, and you won't see banding in scenes with shades of similar colors, like in sunsets. The Smooth Gradation setting helps further reduce any banding in the test pattern and real content, but it also causes a loss of details with high-quality content.

9.8
Picture Quality
Temporary Image Retention
IR after 0 min recovery
0.08%
IR after 2 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 4 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 6 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 8 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 10 min recovery
0.00%

There are very minor signs of temporary image retention after displaying a high-contrast static image for ten minutes, but it disappears very quickly and isn't noticeable. This isn't indicative of long-term burn-in associated with OLEDs either.

2.0
Picture Quality
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Yes

Even though the Sony A95K is likely less prone to burn-in than older OLED panels, there's still a risk. OLED panel technology has significantly advanced since our real-world burn-in test, which used 2017 models, so we don't know just how likely it is that these TVs will experience burn-in. We'll be starting a new burn-in test shortly to try to determine how effective each of these new panel technologies are at reducing the risk of burn-in, so our estimated burn-in risk score may change.

Motion
9.7
Motion
Response Time
80% Response Time
0.2 ms
100% Response Time
4.1 ms

The Sony A95K has a near-instantaneous response time that results in almost no motion blur with fast-moving objects. However, because OLEDs use a sample-and-hold method, there's still persistence blur.

10
Motion
Flicker-Free
Flicker-Free
No
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The Sony A95K isn't technically flicker-free because there's a slight dip in brightness every 8 ms, which coincides with the refresh rate. However, it isn't the same as pulse width modulation on LED TVs because it isn't a full on and off, and it isn't noticeable either.

8.7
Motion
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Optional BFI
Yes
Min Flicker For 60 fps
60 Hz
60Hz For 60 fps
Yes
120Hz For 120 fps
No
Min Flicker for 60 fps in Game Mode
60 Hz

The Sony A95K has an optional black frame insertion feature to reduce persistence blur. It only flickers at 60Hz, which isn't ideal for 120 fps games. The BFI score is based on its flicker frequency and not its actual performance. Also, you can't use the BFI feature at the same time as VRR.

Motion
Motion Interpolation
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
Yes
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
Yes

The Sony A95K has a motion interpolation feature to bring lower frame rate content up to 120 fps. Like most TVs, it looks best with slow-moving content, but there are distracting artifacts with small, fast-moving objects. Setting the Smoothness to its max makes the motion interpolation look bad, and it's better to leave it at '1' or '2'.

5.4
Motion
Stutter
Frame Hold Time @ 24 fps
37.6 ms
Frame Hold Time @ 60 fps
12.6 ms

Due to the near-instantaneous response time, there's noticeable stutter as each frame is held on longer with low-frame-rate content. Enabling the motion interpolation can help reduce this, but it isn't a perfect solution.

10
Motion
24p Judder
Judder-Free 24p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60i
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via Native Apps
Yes

This TV removes 24p judder from any source, including those that output content in 60Hz. It helps with the appearance of motion in movies. When you enable the BFI feature, it removes judder from 24p sources, but not with 60p/i sources, like a cable box.

9.4
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
120 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
HDMI Forum VRR
Yes
FreeSync
No
G-SYNC Compatible
Yes
4k VRR Maximum
120 Hz
4k VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
1080p VRR Maximum
120 Hz
1080p VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
1440p VRR Minimum
Unknown
VRR Supported Connectors
HDMI

The Sony A95K supports variable refresh rate (VRR) formats to reduce screen tearing. HDMI Forum VRR and G-SYNC compatibility both work without issue, and it supports Low Framerate Compensation (LFC) to continue working when the frame rate drops too low. Because the TV upscales 1440p content to 4k, and it isn't a proper 1440p signal, we left 1440p VRR as untested, but VRR works properly with 1440p @ 60Hz games.

Inputs
9.2
Inputs
Input Lag
1080p @ 60Hz
17.5 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
160.2 ms
1080p @ 120Hz
8.9 ms
1080p @ 144Hz
N/A
1440p @ 60Hz
17.0 ms
1440p @ 120Hz
N/A
1440p @ 144Hz
N/A
4k @ 60Hz
16.9 ms
4k @ 60Hz + 10-Bit HDR
16.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
16.9 ms
4k @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
143.4 ms
4k @ 60Hz With Interpolation
135.4 ms
4k @ 120Hz
9.4 ms
4k @ 144Hz
N/A
8k @ 60Hz
N/A

The Sony A95K has low input lag for a responsive gaming feel. It's higher than the Samsung S95B OLED and other premium TVs, but it's still low enough that you won't notice any delay while gaming.

9.3
Inputs
Supported Resolutions
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
1080p @ 144Hz
No
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes (forced resolution required)
1440p @ 120Hz
No
1440p @ 144Hz
No
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
4k @ 120Hz
Yes
4k @ 120Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
4k @ 144Hz
No
8k @ 30Hz or 24Hz
No
8k @ 60Hz
No

The Sony A95K supports most common resolutions up to 4k @ 120Hz, and there aren't any resolution halving issues that some past Sony TVs had. While there are some text clarity issues due to its subpixel layout (see Pixels for more), it still displays proper chroma 4:4:4 with any of its supported resolutions. If you want to send a 1440p @ 60Hz signal, you have to force it with a custom resolution from your PC. However, keep in mind that HDMI ports 3 and 4 support full HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, allowing the TV to display these various resolutions like 4k @ 120Hz. HDMI ports 1 and 2 support HDMI 2.0 bandwidth, so it can't display certain signals like 4k @ 120Hz 4:4:4 with devices connected to those ports.

Inputs
PS5 Compatibility
Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM)
Yes
4k @ 120Hz
Yes
1440p @ 120Hz
No
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
Yes

The Sony A90K works properly with the PS5 as long as you have it connected to HDMI 3 or 4 because they support full HDMI 2.1 bandwidth. As it's a Sony product, it has a few proprietary features made for the PS5, like Auto HDR Tone Mapping, and its ALLM support automatically puts the TV into Game Mode without changing any settings.

Inputs
Xbox Series X|S Compatibility
Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM)
Yes
4k @ 120Hz
Yes
1440p @ 120Hz
No
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
Yes

The Sony A95K works without issue with the Xbox Series X, except it doesn't support 1440p @ 120Hz. Also, Dolby Vision only works up to 4k @ 60Hz, and if you want a 4k @ 120Hz signal, the TV doesn't support Dolby Vision. The TV also supports ALLM, but unlike the PS5, you need to enable Auto Picture Mode for it to work. You need to have the Xbox connected to HDMI slots 3 or 4 to use it to its full capabilities as they support HDMI 2.1 bandwidth.

Inputs
Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Yes
HDR10+
No
Dolby Vision
Yes
HLG
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
HDMI 2.1 Class Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 3,4)
CEC Yes
HDCP 2.2 Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
ATSC Tuner
3.0 (NEXTGEN TV)
USB 3.0
Yes (1)
Variable Analog Audio Out No
Wi-Fi Support Yes (2.4 GHz, 5 GHz)

Unlike the Samsung S95B OLED, the Sony A95K supports Dolby Vision but not HDR10+. HDMI ports 3 and 4 also support the full 48 Gbps bandwidth of HDMI 2.1, while HDMI 1 and 2 are limited to HDMI 2.0 bandwidth, so they don't support as many signals like 4k @ 120Hz. The ATSC 3.0 support also allows you to stream over-the-air channels in 4k.

Inputs
Input Photos

The Sony A95K has both bottom and side-facing inputs, although the majority are at the bottom. You can also see the power input on the back left side here and the camera input on top here.

Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI 4
USB 2
Digital Optical Audio Out 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm 0
Analog Audio Out RCA 0
Component In 0
Composite In 1 (adapter required, not incl.)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) 1
Ethernet 1
DisplayPort 0
IR In 1
SD/SDHC 0
Inputs
Audio Passthrough
ARC
Yes (HDMI 3)
eARC support
Yes
Dolby Atmos via TrueHD via eARC
Yes
DTS:X via DTS-HD MA via eARC
Yes
5.1 Dolby Digital via ARC
Yes
5.1 DTS via ARC
Yes
5.1 Dolby Digital via Optical
Yes
5.1 DTS via Optical
Yes

The Sony A95K supports eARC, allowing you to pass high-quality, uncompressed audio to a compatible receiver through an HDMI cable. However, because the eARC port is also one of the HDMI 2.1 ports, you can only connect one other HDMI 2.1 device if you connect a soundbar or receiver that doesn't support HDMI 2.1 passthrough. You can also connect a compatible Sony soundbar to the S-Center speaker input and use the TV's speakers as a center channel.

Sound Quality
7.0
Sound Quality
Frequency Response
Low-Frequency Extension
84.76 Hz
Std. Dev. @ 70
3.89 dB
Std. Dev. @ 80
3.06 dB
Std. Dev. @ Max
6.74 dB
Max
92.2 dB SPL
Dynamic Range Compression
4.55 dB

The Sony A95K has a decent frequency response. It has a well-balanced sound profile with moderate listening levels and gets loud, but there's more compression at its max volume. Like most TVs, it doesn't produce much bass, so you need a proper surround sound setup for the best sound possible. These tests were done with the stand in the 'Back' position (the stand in front of the TV), using the digital room correction feature.

7.1
Sound Quality
Distortion
Weighted THD @ 80
0.229
Weighted THD @ Max
1.028
IMD @ 80
1.25%
IMD @ Max
4.21%

The Sony A95K has decent distortion handling. It performs well with moderate listening levels but gets worse at its max volume.

Smart Features
8.0
Smart Features
Interface
Smart OS Google TV
Version 10
Ease of Use
Average
Smoothness
Very Smooth
Time Taken to Select YouTube
2 s
Time Taken to Change Backlight
2 s
Advanced Options
Many

The Google TV interface is user-friendly, and navigating through the menu feels very smooth. It may take time to learn, but once you do, it's a great smart platform.

0
Smart Features
Ad-Free
Ads
Yes
Opt-out
No
Suggested Content in Home
Yes
Opt-out of Suggested Content
No

Unfortunately, like most TVs, there are ads throughout the interface. You can opt-out of personalized ads; however, you'll get non-targeted ads instead.

9.0
Smart Features
Apps and Features
App Selection
Great
App Smoothness
Very Smooth
Cast Capable
Yes
USB Drive Playback
Yes
USB Drive HDR Playback
Yes
HDR in Netflix
Yes
HDR in YouTube
Yes

The Google Play Store has tons of apps available to download, and they run very smoothly. It has Google Chromecast built-in, meaning you can cast content from your phone.

8.5
Smart Features
Remote
Size
Small
Voice Control
Many Features
CEC Menu Control
Yes
Other Smart Features
No
Remote App Android TV

The Sony A95K has a more premium remote than other Sony TVs, as it has a silver brushed finish. It features backlighting and has a sensor that illuminates the buttons in a dark room. The mic allows you to ask it to open apps, search for content, and switch inputs, but you can't change settings like the brightness. There's also a mic built into the TV that you can use for hands-free voice control or to help find your remote.

The TV comes with the BRAVIA webcam, which you can attach on top. It provides a few extra features like Auto Power Saving Mode that darkens the screen when you walk away and has Auto Calibration modes that adjust the picture and sound depending on where you're sitting. It will also support Gesture Control and Proximity Alert after firmware updates.

Smart Features
TV Controls

There's a single button above the side inputs to turn the TV On/Off, change channels, adjust the volume, switch inputs, or use the Find Remote feature. There's a switch to turn the built-in mic in the TV off if you're concerned about privacy, and you can also shut the camera when you aren't actively using it.

Smart Features
In The Box

  • Remote control
  • 2x AAA batteries
  • Cable tie
  • User guides

Smart Features
Misc
Power Consumption 126 W
Power Consumption (Max) 306 W
Firmware PKG6.5770.0680NAA

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 65-inch Sony A95K, and it's also available in a 55-inch size, for which the results are also valid. The model code remains the same across different regions.

Size Model
55" XR-55A95K
65" XR-65A95K

If you come across a different type of panel or your Sony A95K doesn't correspond to our review, let us know, and we'll update the review.

Our unit was manufactured in July 2022, and you can see the label here.

Compared To Other TVs

The Sony A95K is a remarkable TV that delivers better HDR picture quality than most TVs we've tested. If you're looking for the best TV for watching HDR movies, you won't be disappointed as it displays a wide range of colors and makes them look vivid. However, it comes with a premium price tag too, so if you don't need that or want to use your TV in a well-lit room, there are cheaper OLEDs available that don't have the raised black level issue, like the LG C2 OLED.

See our recommendations for the best HDR TVs, the best TVs for movies, and the best OLEDs.

Samsung S95B OLED
55" 65"

The Samsung S95B OLED and the Sony A95K OLED are both remarkable TVs with strengths and weaknesses. They use the same panel type, so the differences come down to image processing. The A95K focuses on accuracy over brightness, so it has better tone mapping in HDR as details are better, and it doesn't have black crush like on the Samsung. However, the Samsung TV focuses more on brightness, meaning it delivers brighter highlights in some scenes. The Sony model also supports Dolby Vision, which the Samsung doesn't, and it's a format that more content uses. However, the Samsung TV is the better gaming TV because it has lower input lag and supports FreeSync, which the Sony model doesn't.

LG G2 OLED
55" 65" 77" 83" 97"

The Sony A95K OLED and the LG G2 OLED are both fantastic TVs with a few differences. The Sony delivers a better movie-watching experience because it has much better color volume and tone mapping, meaning it displays a wider range of colors and makes them look more vivid. However, the LG is better for use in well-lit rooms because ambient lighting doesn't cause the black levels to raise like on the Sony, and it gets much brighter in SDR. The LG has lower input lag, which is good if you're a gamer.

Sony A90J OLED
55" 65" 83"

The Sony A95K OLED is an improvement over the Sony A90J OLED, especially with watching HDR content. The A95K uses new QD-OLED technology, which is a type of OLED that allows it to display more vivid colors and brighter highlights than the A90J. However, if you want to use your TV in a well-lit room, the A90J maintains perfect black levels in well-lit rooms, as the black levels raise on the A95K when there's ambient lighting.

LG C2 OLED
42" 48" 55" 65" 77" 83"

The Sony A95K OLED and the LG C2 OLED are fantastic for different uses. If you watch lots of movies, the Sony TV is the better choice because of its better color volume and tone mapping, meaning it displays a wider range of colors and makes them look more vivid. However, the LG is better for use in well-lit rooms because ambient lighting causes the black levels to raise on the Sony, which it doesn't with the LG, and it gets much brighter in SDR. The LG also has lower input lag for gaming.

Sony A80K OLED
55" 65" 77"

The Sony A95K OLED is a much better TV than the Sony A80K OLED. The A95K uses QD-OLED technology, which is a type of OLED that allows it to display more colors and get brighter than traditional OLEDs like the A80K, so it's much better for watching HDR content. However, the A80K performs better in well-lit rooms because the black levels raise on the A95K when there's any ambient light, so you don't get the same perfect black levels that OLEDs are known for.

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