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20/7 Burn-In Test
OLED vs LCD VA vs LCD IPS

On August 31 2017, we started a long-term 20/7 burn-in test on 3 TVs (OLED vs VA vs IPS). We aim to see how their performance change over time, especially with some static images such as network logos, black bars in movies, or video games with a fixed interface.

We already test for temporary image retention, which generally subsides over the course of a few minutes. This is more of a temporary annoyance and results in some faint artifacts usually visible in areas of high contrast.

Permanent image retention is a more serious issue, but it requires looking at the TV's performance over the course of months or years. We will be testing 3 TVs side-by-side, the OLED LG B6, the VA Samsung KU6300 and the IPS LG UJ6300 in a year-long test.

Week 58 (10/04/2018): Photos updated. The IPS UJ6300 continues to show darker areas and discoloration.
Week 56 (10/04/2018): Uniformity photos updated.
Week 54 (09/20/2018): Uniformity photos have been updated. The UJ6300 is showing darker areas on the screen visibile in the 50% gray slide. This appears to have been increasing over the past few weeks.
Week 52 (09/07/2018): It has now been one year since the start of the 20/7 burn-in test. We have included a summary of the results so far below.
Week 50 (08/23/2018): Photos updated.
Week 48 (08/09/2018): Photos have been updated.
Week 46 (07/27/2018): Uniformity photos have been updated.
Week 44 (07/13/2018): All results have been updated including peak brightness, color gamut, and uniformity photos. The peak brightness and color gamut measurements remain in the same ballpark for all TVs.
Week 42 (06/28/2018): Uniformity photos updated.
Week 40 (06/14/2018): New uniformity photos have been taken for each TV.
Week 38 (05/31/2018): Uniformity photos have been updated.
Week 36 (05/18/2018): All results have been updated including uniformity photos, color gamut measurements and peak brightness measurements. Brightness and color gamut are in the same ballpark. Next uniformity photos update will be 05/31/2018 and next full update is 07/12/2018.
Week 34 (05/04/2018): Uniformity photos have been updated.
Week 32 (04/19/2018): Results updated. The TVs have been mounted on the wall next to the real life OLED burn-in test. The photos appear slightly different, but this doesn't affect the appearance of burn-in.
Week 30 (04/05/2018): Uniformity photos have been updated.
Week 28 (03/23/2018): Peak brightness, color gamut and uniformity photos have all been updated.
Week 26 (03/08/2018): New photos taken. Retention in the IPS TV is becoming apparent.
Week 24 (02/22/2018): Uniformity issues continue to progress.
Week 22 (02/08/2018): Results have been updated.
Week 20 (01/25/2018): Uniformity and color gamut/peak brightness results have been updated. From this point, we will adjust our measurement cadence to match the Real life OLED burn-in test. The next uniformity photos will be posted week 22 (02/08/2018) and the next color gamut/peak brightness measurements will be posted week 28 (03/22/2018).
Week 19 (01/18/2018): Results have been updated.
Week 18 (01/11/2018): The uniformity photos have been updated. When looking at the solid logo of the B6, some color shift is noticeable. This may be due to the different rates of sub-pixel degradation.
Update 01/05/2018: We posted a video update discussing the results so far here. Also, we are starting a new concurrent OLED burn-in test with real live content.
Week 17 (12/29/2017): The color gamut and peak brightness have been updated and remain in the same ballpark for all TVs.
Week 16 (12/22/2017): Results updated.
Week 15 (12/14/2017): New results posted.
Week 14 (12/07/2017): Uniformity photos updated.
Week 13 (11/30/2017): No significant changes to brightness or gamut.
Week 12 (11/23/2017): Uniformity photos updated for week 12.
Week 11 (11/16/2017): New results have been posted.
Week 10 (11/09/2017): The results have been updated.
Week 9 (11/02/2017): Screen photos have been taken and the color gamut and peak brightness tests have been performed. Burn-in continues to develop on the B6, however the peak brightness and color gamut remain in the same ballpark.
Week 8 (10/26/2017): The LG UJ6300 has received a firmware update (04.70.03). Retention continues to become more visible on all four corners of the red and magenta slides.
Week 7 (10/19/2017): New screen uniformity photos have been taken. Retention is visible in all 4 logos on the B6.
Week 6 (10/12/2017): The screen uniformity photos have been updated, and the retention issues continue to develop on the B6. Because no changes to peak brightness and color gamut have been observed so far on any TV, the frequency has been reduced to every 4 weeks. As a result, the next peak brightness and color gamut update will be 11/02/2017.
Week 5 (10/05/2017): Image retention continues to develop on the B6. OLED Light/Backlight settings: B6-63, KU6300-7, UJ6300-100.
Week 4 (09/28/2017): Some retention is visible on the LG B6 OLED in purple, red, green and blue slides. OLED Light/Backlight settings: B6-63, KU6300-7, UJ6300-100.
Week 3 (09/21/2017): No significant changes since week 2. OLED Light/Backlight settings: B6-63, KU6300-7, UJ6300-100.
Week 2 (09/14/2017): The B6 has received a firmware update (05.30.03). There are beginning to be signs of permanent image retention at the static logos in each corner. The brightness and color gamut measurements are all within measurement variance. OLED Light/Backlight settings: B6-63, KU6300-7, UJ6300-100.
Update 09/01/2017: As a result of feedback from readers, we have updated the methodology to turn all TVs off for 4 hours per day, and have included a yellow 'I' in the Rtings logo.

Test Setup

 Burn-In Test Setup

The TVs are placed side-by-side in one of our testing rooms as shown to the right. The TVs will stay on for 20 hours per day, 7 days per week, running our test pattern in a loop. They will be turned off for 4 hours each day using USB infrared transmitters connected to each TV and controlled by a PC to better represent normal (but still very heavy) usage. Calibration settings have been applied, with the backlight or OLED light set to produce 175 nits on our checkerboard pattern. On the B6, the 'Pixel Shift' option is enabled.  A single Android TV Box is used as a source, with a HDMI splitter used to provide the same material to each display.

The Pattern

 Burn-In Test Pattern

A 5.5 hour video loop is used as the test pattern. It has been designed to mix static content with moving images to represent some typical content. The base material is a recording of over the air antenna TV with RTINGS overlay logos of different opacities and durations, and letterbox black bars added. These additional elements are:

  • Top and bottom: Letterbox bars present for 2 hours, then absent for 3.5 hours (movie example)
  • Top left: 100% solid logo, present for the whole clip (torture test)
  • Top right: 50% opacity logo, present for the whole clip (network logo torture test)
  • Bottom left: 100% solid logo, present for 2 hours then absent for 3.5 hours (video games example)
  • Bottom right: 50% opacity logo, present for 10 minutes then absent for 2 minutes (sports or TV shows example)

Weekly Updates

Each week we will perform the following procedure

Results (Last updated 10/18/2018)

09/07/2018 It has now been one year since we started the 20/7 burn-in test and the TVs have each been on for more than 7000 hours. The goal of this test was to see whether burn-in could happen for the three most popular TV types (VA LCD, IPS LCD and OLED). Some results so far:

  • Long periods of static content will cause burn-in on OLED TVs. The red sub-pixel appears to degrade the fastest, followed by green and then blue. The effect appears to be cumulative, as even cycled logos do burn-in (but over a longer period of time). We are investigating this more in our Real Life OLED Burn-in Test
  • We haven't experienced any signs of burn-in on the two LCD TVs (IPS and VA type panels).
  • The 'Pixel Shift' option on the OLED LG B6 can help to spread static content over more pixels (so each pixel is displaying the same content for less time) but for our large logo is not effective. It may be useful for very small static areas
  • Black letterbox bars have been displayed for over 2,500 hours. This has not caused noticeable uniformity issues yet.
  • The brightness of the UJ6300 appears to have started trending downwards (see here). We will continue to monitor this trend over the coming months. The other two TVs have maintained approximately the same brightness.
  • The color gamut of these TVs hasn't changed appreciatively

HDR Peak Brightness

10% window
100% window

Color Gamut (Rec 2020 % xy)

Uniformity

Week 58

OLED LG B6

VA Samsung KU6300

IPS LG UJ6300

Limitations of the test

  • Small sample size, so it won't show the variance between units of the same technology
  • Extreme case, where TVs are running 20 hours a day with the same 5.5 hours loop. You will get a better lifespan at home if you use the TV less and with more varied content.

Conclusion

The goal of this test is to get more information on the burn-in issue on TVs and how it affects their lifespan. We will have more information in the next few months on how it should impact your buying decisions.

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