Your browser is not supported or outdated so some features of the site might not be available.
363
TVs store-bought and tested, supported by you via insider access, and when you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Driven by data, run by a passionate team of engineers, testers, technical writers, developers, and more. We are hiring!

Sony A80K OLED TV Review

Tested using Methodology v1.6
Reviewed Jul 25, 2022 at 10:38 am
Sony A80K OLED Picture
8.8
Mixed Usage
Value for price beaten by
: Not at the latest test bench
9.4
Movies
Value for price beaten by
: Not at the latest test bench
8.1
TV Shows
Value for price beaten by
: Not at the latest test bench
8.5
Sports
Value for price beaten by
: Not at the latest test bench
9.1
Video Games
Value for price beaten by
: Not at the latest test bench
8.7
HDR Movies
Value for price beaten by
: Not at the latest test bench
9.0
HDR Gaming
Value for price beaten by
: Not at the latest test bench
8.7
PC Monitor
Value for price beaten by
: Not at the latest test bench
Type OLED
Sub-Type
WOLED
Resolution 4k

The Sony A80K OLED is one of two entry-level OLEDs in Sony's 2022 lineup. It sits behind the Sony A90K OLED and the QD-OLED Sony A95K OLED, and in Europe, it sits ahead of the Sony A75K. It replaces the Sony A80J OLED from 2021, and it's largely unchanged from its predecessor. It uses the same Cognitive Processor XR, and it has many of the same features like the HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, variable refresh rate (VRR) support, and the S-Center speaker input to use the TV's speakers as a center channel when connecting a compatible Sony soundbar. It also uses the same Google TV smart platform, and like its predecessor, it's available in 55-inch, 65-inch, and 77-inch models.

Our Verdict

8.8 Mixed Usage

The Sony A80K is excellent for most uses. It performs best in dark rooms while watching movies because it displays deep blacks without any blooming in dark scenes. It's excellent for HDR because of that dark room performance and the fact that it displays a wide range of colors, but its HDR brightness isn't high enough for the best HDR experience. It's great for watching TV shows and excellent for sports in well-lit rooms thanks to its wide viewing angle and incredible reflection handling, but it doesn't get bright enough to fight a ton of glare. Lastly, it's fantastic for gaming as it has variable refresh rate (VRR) support with HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, a quick response time, and low input lag.

Pros
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio for deep blacks.
  • No issues upscaling lower-resolution content.
  • Incredible reflection handling.
  • Wide viewing angle.
Cons
  • Low peak brightness, especially before calibration.
  • Limited HDR peak brightness.
9.4 Movies

The Sony A80K is incredible for watching movies in dark rooms. It displays deep blacks without any blooming, meaning it looks amazing in dark rooms. It also removes 24p judder from any source and doesn't have trouble upscaling lower-resolution content. Sadly though, low-frame-rate content like movies stutter because of the TV's quick response time.

Pros
  • Perfect black uniformity.
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio for deep blacks.
  • Removes 24p judder from any source.
  • No issues upscaling lower-resolution content.
Cons
  • Stutter due to near-instantaneous response time.
8.1 TV Shows

The Sony A80K is great for watching TV shows in well-lit rooms. It has incredible reflection handling that reduces the amount of glare from some light sources, but it doesn't get very bright, so it isn't ideal to place in very bright rooms. Luckily, it has a wide viewing angle so that the image remains consistent from the sides, which is great if you watch shows with the entire family. It also doesn't have any trouble upscaling content from cable boxes and has a great smart platform if you stream your content.

Pros
  • No issues upscaling lower-resolution content.
  • Incredible reflection handling.
  • Wide viewing angle.
Cons
  • Low peak brightness, especially before calibration.
8.5 Sports

The Sony A80K is excellent for watching sports. Fast-moving balls and players look excellent thanks to the near-instantaneous response time, so there isn't any motion blur. It also has incredible reflection handling if you have a few lights around, but it doesn't get bright enough to fight a ton of glare. Lastly, it has a wide viewing angle, which is great if you want to watch the game with a few friends as everyone sees the same image from the sides.

Pros
  • No issues upscaling lower-resolution content.
  • Incredible reflection handling.
  • Wide viewing angle.
  • Fast-moving objects look smooth.
Cons
  • Low peak brightness, especially before calibration.
9.1 Video Games

The Sony A80K is fantastic for gaming. It has features most gamers would expect, like HDMI 2.1 bandwidth on two ports and HDMI Forum VRR and G-SYNC support, but it doesn't support FreeSync, which is disappointing if you have a PC with an older AMD graphics card. It has a near-instantaneous response time for smooth motion, and it has low enough input lag for a responsive feel. It's also incredible for dark room gaming as it displays deep blacks without any blooming.

Pros
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio for deep blacks.
  • Fast-moving objects look smooth.
  • VRR support and HDMI 2.1 bandwidth.
  • Low input lag.
Cons
  • No FreeSync support.
8.7 HDR Movies

The Sony A80K is excellent for watching HDR movies. It performs very well in dark rooms as it has a near-infinite contrast ratio that results in perfect black levels and no blooming around bright objects. It also displays a wide range of colors in HDR. Its HDR peak brightness is okay, and some highlights stand out, but it isn't bright enough to make a ton of colors look vivid.

Pros
  • Perfect black uniformity.
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio for deep blacks.
  • Removes 24p judder from any source.
  • Displays wide range of colors.
Cons
  • Stutter due to near-instantaneous response time.
  • Limited HDR peak brightness.
9.0 HDR Gaming

The Sony A80K is fantastic for HDR gaming. It has fantastic gaming performance, thanks to its fast response time, low input lag, HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, and VRR support. HDR also looks excellent as it displays deep and inky blacks and a wide range of colors, but it doesn't get bright enough for an HDR image that really pops and looks vivid.

Pros
  • Perfect black uniformity.
  • VRR support and HDMI 2.1 bandwidth.
  • Low input lag.
  • Displays wide range of colors.
Cons
  • No FreeSync support.
  • Limited HDR peak brightness.
8.7 PC Monitor

The Sony A80K is excellent for use as a PC monitor. It has low input lag for a responsive desktop feel, and the wide viewing angle ensures the edges of the screen aren't washed out if you sit too close, but colors shift if you sit close, which isn't ideal for photo editing. It has incredible reflection handling if you use it in a room with a few lights around, but its peak brightness is a bit limited. Sadly, OLEDs risk permanent burn-in, and this TV shows signs of temporary image retention with exposure to static elements.

Pros
  • Incredible reflection handling.
  • Wide viewing angle.
  • Fast-moving objects look smooth.
  • Low input lag.
Cons
  • Low peak brightness, especially before calibration.
  • No FreeSync support.
  • 8.8 Mixed Usage
  • 9.4 Movies
  • 8.1 TV Shows
  • 8.5 Sports
  • 9.1 Video Games
  • 8.7 HDR Movies
  • 9.0 HDR Gaming
  • 8.7 PC Monitor
  1. Updated Jul 26, 2022: Added that the Sony A80CK version sold at Costco comes with a backlit remote.
  2. Updated Jul 25, 2022: Review published.
  3. Updated Jul 20, 2022: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved No

The Sony A80K looks very similar to the Sony A80J OLED. It has a premium design with metal feet and an all-black plastic body. It also has thin bezels that aren't distracting while watching TV.

Design
Stand

The Sony A80K has metal feet that support the screen very well, and there's minimal wobble. Like some other Sony TVs, it has three different stand positions: a narrow position if you have a small table, a wide position if you want minimal space between the screen and the table, and a high position if you want to place a soundbar in front without blocking the screen. You can see the dimensions of the 65-inch TV below (W x D x H to the bottom of the screen):

Design
Back
Wall Mount VESA 300x300

The back of the Sony A80K is entirely plastic, and there's a cover for cable management, but otherwise, it doesn't have clips to route your cables to the inputs. As the inputs are side-facing, they're hard to reach with the TV wall-mounted and nearly impossible to get to if you mount it with the cover on.

Design
Borders
Borders 0.31" (0.8 cm)
Design
Thickness
Max Thickness 2.09" (5.3 cm)
9.0
Design
Build Quality

The Sony A80K has fantastic build quality. The stand supports the TV very well, and there aren't any quality control issues as the panel is attached to the back properly, and the cable management cover also stays in place. There's a bit of flex on the back panel, but it isn't a major concern. However, overall it doesn't feel as good as the Sony A80J OLED because there's less metal, and the plastic doesn't feel as good.

Unfortunately, our unit sustained some damage during shipping with a scratch on the back and a bent bottom bezel. However, we don't suspect it's a common problem, and it doesn't affect the TV's performance. Because of this, the damage doesn't impact the build quality score.

Picture Quality
10
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
Inf : 1
Contrast with local dimming
N/A

The Sony A80K has a near-infinite contrast ratio with perfect black levels in dark rooms. It means it's a fantastic choice for watching content in dark environments.

6.6
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene Peak Brightness
284 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
456 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
454 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
451 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
288 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
155 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
430 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
435 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
436 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
286 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
152 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.069

The Sony A80K's SDR peak brightness is just okay, and it's a bit disappointing as it isn't as bright as the Sony A80J OLED or other 2022 OLEDs like the LG C2 OLED, and it doesn't get bright enough to fight a ton of glare. It gets brightest after a full calibration as it only reaches a peak of 399 cd/m² in the 2% window before calibration. It also has an aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter that makes larger areas dimmer, which isn't ideal if you use it as a PC monitor or watch sports like hockey.

The results are in the 'Custom' Picture Mode after calibration with the Brightness at its max, Contrast at its default of '90', Color Temperature set to 'Expert 1', and the Peak Luminance on 'High'. Setting Peak Luminance to 'High' helps gets this TV brighter, as disabling it results in a much dimmer image, but there isn't much variation between different scenes as you can see below:

  • Peak 2% Window: 116 cd/m²
  • Peak 10% Window: 128 cd/m²
  • Peak 25% Window: 126 cd/m²
  • Peak 50% Window: 126 cd/m²
  • Peak 100% Window: 119 cd/m²
  • Sustained 2% Window: 114 cd/m²
  • Sustained 10% Window: 125 cd/m²
  • Sustained 25% Window: 122 cd/m²
  • Sustained 50% Window: 122 cd/m²
  • Sustained 100% Window: 118 cd/m²

If you want the brightest image possible and you don't care about accuracy, then use the 'Vivid' Picture Mode with the Brightness and Contrast at their max, Live Color, Advanced Contrast Enhancer, and Peak Luminance on 'High', and the Color Temperature on 'Cool'. It results in a peak brightness of 766 cd/m² in the 2% window.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

The Sony A80K doesn't have a backlight, but thanks to its near-infinite contrast ratio, it's equivalent to a perfect local dimming feature. We still film these videos on the TV, so you can see how it performs and compare it with a TV with local dimming.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming In Game Mode
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

The Sony A80K doesn't have a backlight, but thanks to its near-infinite contrast ratio, it's equivalent to a perfect local dimming feature. We still film these videos on the TV, so you can see how it performs in Game Mode and compare it with a TV with local dimming.

6.6
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
Real Scene Highlight
542 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
750 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
669 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
502 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
288 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
137 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
688 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
630 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
488 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
286 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
134 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.099

The Sony A80K has alright HDR peak brightness, but like in SDR, it's a downgrade compared to the Sony A80J OLED. Some small highlights stand out versus the rest of the screen, but it doesn't get bright enough for a truly satisfying HDR experience. The EOTF follows the target PQ curve almost perfectly until there's a sharp roll-off at the peak brightness, causing a loss of fine details in bright scenes.

These results are from the 'Custom' HDR Picture Mode with the Brightness at its max, Color Temperature on 'Expert 2', and the HDR Tone Mapping set to 'Gradation Preferred'. If you find the image too dim, set the Contrast to its max, Advanced Contrast Enhancer and Peak Luminance to 'High', and HDR Tone Mapping to 'Brightness Preferred'. This results in a brighter image, but it doesn't change the peak luminance.

The EOTF changes according to the settings you use for HDR Tone Mapping, and you can see the differences below:

6.6
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness In Game Mode
Real Scene Highlight
549 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
750 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
631 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
446 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
274 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
159 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
687 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
600 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
437 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
272 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
158 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.089

The HDR brightness in Game Mode is nearly the same as outside of Game Mode, and there isn't a noticeable difference. These results are with the same settings as outside of Game Mode, but with the Picture Mode set to 'Game'.

8.5
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
1.094%
50% DSE
0.134%
5% Std. Dev.
0.563%
5% DSE
0.104%

The Sony A80K's gray uniformity is excellent. The screen is uniform throughout, and there isn't much dirty screen effect that could be distracting during sports. Like any OLED, there are thin vertical lines in near-black scenes, but they're hard to spot unless you sit really close.

10
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
0.246%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

Like any OLED TV, the Sony A80K has perfect black uniformity as there isn't any blooming around bright objects.

9.0
Picture Quality
Viewing Angle
Color Washout
63°
Color Shift
26°
Brightness Loss
66°
Black Level Raise
70°
Gamma Shift
67°

The Sony A80K has a fantastic viewing angle. The image remains consistent from the sides. Even if colors start to shift at a moderate viewing angle, it's still a great choice for wide seating areas.

9.1
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Glossy
Total Reflections
1.8%
Indirect Reflections
0.4%
Calculated Direct Reflections
1.4%

The Sony A80K has incredible reflection handling. Reflections from bright light sources aren't too distracting, and even if there's a bit of a purple tint, it isn't distracting or too noticeable like on the Samsung S95B OLED.

8.3
Picture Quality
Pre Calibration
White Balance dE
2.52
Color dE
1.71
Gamma
2.16
Color Temperature
6,910 K
Picture Mode
Custom
Color Temp Setting
Expert 1
Gamma Setting
0

The Sony A80K has great out-of-the-box accuracy in SDR. Most colors are accurate, and even if the white balance is a bit off, it's still great. The color temperature is slightly on the cold side, giving the image a blue tint, but it's still close to the 6500K target. Gamma follows the 2.2 target for moderately-lit rooms fairly well, except some brighter scenes are too bright.

9.6
Picture Quality
Post Calibration
White Balance dE
0.21
Color dE
0.91
Gamma
2.20
Color Temperature
6,502 K
White Balance Calibration
10 point
Color Calibration
Yes

The Sony A80K has incredible accuracy after calibration to the D65 white point. It's easy to calibrate the white balance, but calibrating any colors makes the image worse. The color temperature and gamma are both spot-on with their targets too.

You can see the full settings for our calibration here.

8.0
Picture Quality
480p Input

The Sony A80K upscales lower-resolution content from DVDs without issue.

8.0
Picture Quality
720p Input

720p content, like from HD cable channels, looks great.

9.0
Picture Quality
1080p Input

The Sony A80K displays 1080p content almost as good as native 4k content.

10
Picture Quality
4k Input

There aren't any issues with native 4k content on the Sony A80K.

0
Picture Quality
8k Input

The Sony A80K is a 4k TV that can't display an 8k signal.

Picture Quality
Pixels

The Sony A80K uses an RWBG panel, known as WOLED, with four subpixels. Because all four pixels are never all on at the same time, you can see different pixel configurations here and here. You can also see the spectral power distribution of the panel.

8.7
Picture Quality
Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI P3 xy
97.95%
DCI P3 uv
99.20%
Rec 2020 xy
72.00%
Rec 2020 uv
76.53%

The Sony A80K has an excellent color gamut. It displays a wide range of colors in the commonly-used DCI-P3 color space, and it has decent Rec. 2020 coverage, so it's future-proof as more content will start coming out with that color space. The tone mapping with the tested 75% stimulus is good, but some brighter colors are a bit off in Rec. 2020.

These results are with the same settings used for the HDR Brightness tests, including with HDR Tone Mapping set to 'Gradation Preferred'. However, the gamut coverage changes depending on which HDR Tone Mapping setting you use, as you can see below:

Brightness PreferredDCI-P3Rec. 2020
Gradation Preferred
(Judd White Point)
DCI-P3Rec. 2020
OffDCI-P3Rec. 2020

7.3
Picture Quality
Color Volume
Normalized DCI P3 Coverage ITP
84.0%
10,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage ITP
44.5%
Normalized Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
60.9%
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
32.7%

The Sony A80K has a decent color volume. It displays dark colors well because of its near-infinite contrast ratio, but it isn't as good as the Samsung S95B OLED at displaying bright colors because it doesn't get as bright.

9.3
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit
Red (Std. Dev.)
0.066
Green (Std. Dev.)
0.079
Blue (Std. Dev.)
0.058
Gray (Std. Dev.)
0.072

The gradient handling is incredible. There's just a bit of banding in greens, but even that is hard to notice, and you won't see much banding with regular content. Setting Smooth Gradation to 'Medium' or 'High' smooths out gradients with real content, but it also causes a loss of fine details with high-quality content.

7.3
Picture Quality
Temporary Image Retention
IR after 0 min recovery
0.84%
IR after 2 min recovery
0.04%
IR after 4 min recovery
0.07%
IR after 6 min recovery
0.03%
IR after 8 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 10 min recovery
0.01%

Unfortunately, the Sony A80K shows some signs of temporary image retention after displaying a high-contrast static image for 10 minutes. It's most noticeable immediately after the static image disappears, and eventually, the image retention fades. It isn't visible with regular content like sports, and it's more of a problem for PC use. Keep in mind that it isn't indicative of long-term burn-in OLEDs may face.

2.0
Picture Quality
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Yes

Even though newer OLED panels like the one on the Sony A80K are likely less prone to burn-in, there's still a risk. OLED panel technology has significantly advanced since our real-world burn-in test, which used 2017 models, so we don't know just how likely it is that these TVs will experience burn-in. We'll be starting a new burn-in test shortly to determine how effective each of these new panel technologies is at reducing the risk of burn-in, so our estimated burn-in risk score may change.

Motion
9.8
Motion
Response Time
80% Response Time
0.2 ms
100% Response Time
3.1 ms

The Sony A80K has a near-instantaneous response time that results in almost no motion blur behind fast-moving objects. It has a bit of overshoot in dark transitions, but it isn't visible. However, due to the sample-and-hold nature of OLEDs, there's still persistence blur.

10
Motion
Flicker-Free
Flicker-Free
No
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The Sony A80K isn't technically flicker-free because there's a slight dip in brightness every 8 ms, which corresponds to the refresh rate of the TV. However, it isn't noticeable and isn't the same as pulse width modulation on LED-backlit TVs because it isn't a full-screen on and off cycle.

8.7
Motion
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Optional BFI
Yes
Min Flicker For 60 fps
60 Hz
60Hz For 60 fps
Yes
120Hz For 120 fps
No
Min Flicker for 60 fps in Game Mode
60 Hz

The Sony A80K has an optional black frame insertion feature to reduce persistence blur. It only works with 60 fps content, which is disappointing if you want to use it with 120 fps games. Keep in mind that the BFI score is based on the flicker frequencies at which it works and not the actual performance.

Motion
Motion Interpolation
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
Yes
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
Yes

The Sony A80K has a motion interpolation feature to bring 30 and 60 fps content up to 120 fps. Strangely, it looks bad with the test pattern at 30 fps, as you can see in the image above, but it doesn't look like that with real content. With regular content it looks great, especially in slow scenes, and even if there are a few more artifacts with fast-moving scenes, it isn't as bad as on some other TVs.

5.2
Motion
Stutter
Frame Hold Time @ 24 fps
38.6 ms
Frame Hold Time @ 60 fps
13.6 ms

Due to the near-instantaneous response time, there's stutter with lower-frame-rate content as each frame is held on longer. Enabling the motion interpolation can help reduce this.

10
Motion
24p Judder
Judder-Free 24p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60i
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via Native Apps
Yes

The Sony A80K removes 24p judder from any source, including 60p/i sources that don't have a Match Frame Rate feature, which helps with the appearance of motion in movies. However, if you enable the BFI feature, it can't remove judder from 60p/i sources.

9.4
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
120 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
HDMI Forum VRR
Yes
FreeSync
No
G-SYNC Compatible
Yes
4k VRR Maximum
120 Hz
4k VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
1080p VRR Maximum
120 Hz
1080p VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
1440p VRR Minimum
Unknown
VRR Supported Connectors
HDMI

The Sony A80K supports variable refresh rate technology to reduce screen tearing. HDMI Forum VRR and G-SYNC compatibility work over the entire refresh rate range, and it supports Low Framerate Compensation to continue working with low frame rates. Sadly, the lack of FreeSync support is disappointing if you have a PC with an older AMD graphics card.

VRR works with 1440p @ 60Hz signals, but the TV is upscaling 1440p to 4k, so it isn't a real 1440p signal, which is why we left the 1440p VRR range as Unknown.

Inputs
9.2
Inputs
Input Lag
1080p @ 60Hz
17.8 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
169.0 ms
1440p @ 60Hz
17.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz
17.6 ms
4k @ 60Hz + 10-Bit HDR
17.6 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
17.6 ms
4k @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
152.2 ms
4k @ 60Hz With Interpolation
144.1 ms
8k @ 60Hz
N/A
1080p @ 120Hz
9.3 ms
1440p @ 120Hz
N/A
4k @ 120Hz
9.6 ms
8k with VRR
N/A

The Sony A80K has low input lag as long as you're in Game Mode. Although it's a bit higher than most other OLEDs, it's still good enough for a responsive gaming feel. The input lag is very high outside of Game Mode, so if you feel the delay while navigating through menus or using the on-screen keyboard, switch into Game Mode for a more responsive feel.

9.2
Inputs
Supported Resolutions
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes (forced resolution required)
1440p @ 120Hz
No
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
4k @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
8k @ 30Hz or 24Hz
No
8k @ 60Hz
No

The Sony A80K supports most common signals under the HDMI 2.1 bandwidth up to 4k @ 120Hz with HDMI ports 3 and 4. Unlike some Sony TVs in the past there aren't any resolution-halving issues with 4k @ 120Hz signals. It displays proper chroma 4:4:4 with all of its supported resolutions, which is important for clear text while using it with a PC, except you need to send an RGB signal for it to work with 1440p @ 60Hz. Sadly, it doesn't support 1440p @ 120Hz at all.

Inputs
Advanced Console Compatibility
Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM)
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 120Hz + HDR
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 120Hz
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Yes
PS5, 1440p @ 120Hz
No
PS5, 1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
PS5, Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 120Hz + HDR
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Yes
Xbox Series X, 1440p @ 120Hz
No
Xbox Series X, 1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, Variable Refresh Rate
Yes

The Sony A80K works well with the PS5 and Xbox Series X, as long as you have them connected to HDMI ports 3 or 4 for full HDMI 2.1 bandwidth. It only supports Dolby Vision up to 4k @ 60Hz from the Xbox, as Dolby Vision doesn't work with 4k @ 120Hz signals. It has a few PS5-oriented features like the Auto HDR Tone Mapping and ALLM, but the ALLM also works with the Xbox.

Inputs
Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Yes
HDR10+
No
Dolby Vision
Yes
HLG
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
HDMI 2.1 Class Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 3,4)
CEC Yes
HDCP 2.2 Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
USB 3.0
Yes (1)
Variable Analog Audio Out No
Wi-Fi Support Yes (2.4 GHz, 5 GHz)

The Sony A80K supports HDMI 2.1 bandwidth on HDMI ports 3 and 4, while HDMI ports 1 and 2 are limited to HDMI 2.0 bandwidth. As HDMI 3 is an HDMI 2.1 and eARC port, you lose an HDMI 2.1 slot if you connect a receiver, so you can't use HDMI 2.1 bandwidth on multiple devices at the same time unless the receiver also supports it. The tuner supports ATSC 3.0, allowing you to stream over-the-air 4k channels.

Inputs
Input Photos
Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI 4
USB 2
Digital Optical Audio Out 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm 0
Analog Audio Out RCA 0
Component In 0
Composite In 1 (adapter required, not incl.)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) 1
Ethernet 1
DisplayPort 0
IR In 1
SD/SDHC 0

The Sony A80K has one less USB port than the Sony A80J and doesn't have an analog audio output, so you can't connect speakers that require this connection or headphones.

Inputs
Audio Passthrough
ARC
Yes (HDMI 3)
eARC support
Yes
Dolby Atmos via TrueHD via eARC
Yes
DTS:X via DTS-HD MA via eARC
Yes
5.1 Dolby Digital via ARC
Yes
5.1 DTS via ARC
Yes
5.1 Dolby Digital via Optical
Yes
5.1 DTS via Optical
Yes

The Sony A80K supports eARC, allowing you to pass high-quality, uncompressed audio to a compatible receiver through an HDMI cable. You can also connect a compatible Sony soundbar to the S-Center speaker input and use the TV's speakers as a center channel.

Sound Quality
7.1
Sound Quality
Frequency Response
Low-Frequency Extension
80.00 Hz
Std. Dev. @ 70
3.90 dB
Std. Dev. @ 80
4.33 dB
Std. Dev. @ Max
5.99 dB
Max
95.2 dB SPL
Dynamic Range Compression
3.93 dB

The Sony A80K has decent frequency response. It sounds best for dialogue in the mid-range, but it struggles to output much bass and doesn't sound as good as the Sony A80J OLED in the treble range. These tests were done with the TV in the wide stand position using the digital room correction feature.

7.1
Sound Quality
Distortion
Weighted THD @ 80
0.226
Weighted THD @ Max
0.878
IMD @ 80
1.70%
IMD @ Max
4.75%

The Sony A80K has decent distortion handling. It's good at moderate listening levels but gets more noticeable at its max volume.

Smart Features
8.0
Smart Features
Interface
Smart OS Google TV
Version 10
Ease of Use
Average
Smoothness
Very Smooth
Time Taken to Select YouTube
2 s
Time Taken to Change Backlight
2 s
Advanced Options
Many

The Sony A80K comes with the same Google TV smart platform as other Sony TVs. It's user-friendly with smooth menu navigation.

0
Smart Features
Ad-Free
Ads
Yes
Opt-out
No
Suggested Content in Home
Yes
Opt-out of Suggested Content
No

Unfortunately, like most TVs, there are ads throughout the interface. You can opt-out of personalized ads; however, that means you'll get non-targeted ads instead.

9.0
Smart Features
Apps and Features
App Selection
Great
App Smoothness
Very Smooth
Cast Capable
Yes
USB Drive Playback
Yes
USB Drive HDR Playback
Yes
HDR in Netflix
Yes
HDR in YouTube
Yes

The Google Play Store has tons of apps available to download, and they run very smoothly. It has Google Chromecast built-in, meaning you can cast content from your phone. You can also connect the Bravia webcam for video calls.

8.5
Smart Features
Remote
Size
Small
Voice Control
Many Features
CEC Menu Control
Yes
Other Smart Features
No
Remote App Android TV

The Sony A80K has an updated remote compared to the Sony A80J OLED. It's smaller as there's no numpad, and instead, the '123' button brings up a virtual numpad on the screen. There's a mic in the remote and built into the TV that you can use for voice control with Google Assistant, and you can ask it to change inputs, search for content, open apps, and adjust certain settings like the brightness. Note that the Sony A80CK version sold at Costco comes with a premium remote with backlighting.

Smart Features
TV Controls

There's a single button underneath the center of the TV to turn it On/Off, change channels, adjust the volume, or switch inputs. It also has a switch to turn the built-in mic on or off if you're concerned about privacy.

Smart Features
In The Box

  • Remote control
  • 2x AAA batteries
  • 4x VESA adapters
  • Power cable
  • User guides

Smart Features
Misc
Power Consumption 88 W
Power Consumption (Max) 196 W
Firmware PKG6.5929.0696NAA

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 65-inch Sony A80K, and the results are also valid for the 55 and 75-inch models. It's also known as the A80CK at Costco, and it's the same TV, but the only difference is that it comes with a backlit remote, a three-year warranty, and a two-year subscription to the Bravia Core Streaming Service. In Europe, there's both the Sony A80K and the Sony A84K, and while both TVs perform like the North American A80K, the European A84K is the closest equivalent because it has a built-in mic like the North American version.

Size Model Costco
55" XR-55A80K XR55A80CK
65" XR-65A80K XR65A80CK
77" XR-77A80K XR77A80CK

If you come across a different type of panel or your Sony A80K doesn't correspond to our review, let us know, and we’ll update it. Some tests, like gray uniformity, may vary between individual units.

Our unit was manufactured in May 2022, and you can see the label here.

Compared To Other TVs

The Sony A80K is an excellent TV with deep blacks, perfect black uniformity, and great gaming features. However, it's disappointing considering it's a downgrade in a few areas compared to the Sony A80J OLED, like the peak brightness. It doesn't match up to the brighter OLEDs that are coming out in 2022, and if you want the best OLED for picture quality, you can find other options.

See our recommendations for the best smart TVs, the best TVs for movies, and the best 4k HDR TVs.

Sony A80J OLED
55" 65" 77"

The Sony A80K OLED and the Sony A80J OLED are extremely similar TVs with the same features. The A80K downgrades in a few areas, like the brightness, and the built-in speakers are worse. However, the A80K also has a wider 1080p VRR range. Overall, deciding between these two TVs comes down to which you can find for cheaper because they're so similar.

LG C2 OLED
42" 48" 55" 65" 77" 83"

The LG C2 OLED is better overall than the Sony A80K OLED. The main difference is that the LG has a brighter panel, so highlights pop more in HDR. The LG also has better gaming performance with lower input lag and FreeSync support, which is great if you're a PC gamer.

LG C1 OLED
48" 55" 65" 77" 83"

The LG C1 OLED and the Sony A80K OLED are very similar TVs. They each have similar peak brightness and overall picture quality. The main advantage the LG has is that it has lower input lag for gaming, and if you're a PC gamer, it has FreeSync VRR support.

Sony A90J OLED
55" 65" 83"

The Sony A90J OLED is a higher-end TV than the Sony A80K OLED, so it performs a bit better overall. The A90J gets slightly brighter in HDR, delivering a more impactful HDR experience. That's the main difference between the TVs, so if you're after the best picture quality, stick with the Sony.

LG G2 OLED
55" 65" 77" 83" 97"

The LG G2 OLED is better overall than the Sony A80K OLED. While they both deliver the same fantastic dark room performance, the LG gets much brighter, allowing highlights to pop more in HDR. If you're a gamer, you'll also be happy to know the LG has lower input lag for a more responsive feel.

Samsung S95B OLED
55" 65"

The Samsung S95B OLED is much better than the Sony A80K OLED. The Samsung has a QD-OLED panel, allowing it to get brighter and display a wider range of colors than the Sony. The Samsung TV also has better gaming performance with its lower input lag. However, if you use your TV in a bright room, the Sony performs better because blacks still look black in a bright room, whereas ambient lighting causes the black levels to raise on the Samsung.

Sony X95K
65" 75" 85"

The Sony A80K OLED and the Sony X95K are different types of TVs due to their different panel types. If you often watch content in a dark room, the A80K is the better choice as its OLED panel delivers deeper blacks. However, if you want to use it in a well-lit room, the LED panel of the X95K gets much brighter, so it fights glare better.

Sony X90K
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Sony A80K OLED and the Sony X90K are different types of TVs, each with strengths and weaknesses. The A80K is better for dark-room viewing as it delivers deeper blacks, and it's also the better choice for wide seating arrangements because it offers a wider viewing angle. If you prefer something for bright-room viewing, the X90K gets much brighter to counteract glare.

LG G1 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG G1 OLED and the Sony A80K OLED are similar OLED TVs, but the LG is just a bit better overall. The main difference is that the LG gets brighter in HDR, so highlights pop more. If you're a gamer, the LG is also the better choice as it has lower input lag and supports FreeSync VRR, which the Sony TV doesn't.

LG B2 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG B2 OLED and the Sony A80K OLED are both excellent TVs, with a few minor differences. While they each have OLED panels with the same near-infinite contrast, the LG is the better choice for well-lit rooms as it gets brighter in SDR. The LG is also better for gaming thanks to its lower input lag and FreeSync VRR support. However, the Sony TV has a few advantages with image processing as the motion interpolation feature looks better, which is great for watching movies.

+ Show more

Discussions