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HP X27q Monitor Review

Tested using Methodology v1.2
Reviewed Sep 20, 2022 at 09:31 am
HP X27q Picture
7.6
Mixed Usage
7.8
Office
7.9
Gaming
7.2
Media Consumption
7.7
Media Creation
6.4
HDR
Size
27"
Resolution
2560x1440
Max Refresh Rate
165Hz
Pixel Type
IPS
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
HDR10
Yes

The HP X27q is a budget 1440p gaming monitor released in 2021. It has a fast refresh rate and native support for FreeSync variable refresh rate to reduce screen tearing. It's surprisingly well-equipped for a budget monitor, with a versatile backlight strobing feature, HDR support, and a decent stand. Unfortunately, it has very limited connectivity, with no USB support, and it's limited to HDMI 2.0 bandwidth, so it can't take full advantage of the Xbox Series X or PS5 consoles.

Our Verdict

7.6 Mixed Usage

The HP X27q is a good monitor overall. It delivers a very good gaming experience thanks to its fast refresh rate, great motion handling, and low input lag. Its 27-inch, 1440p screen is good for office users or media creators, as you can comfortably work with multiple windows open and see more of your work at once. It's also decent for watching videos, but not in a dark room, as it has low contrast, a bad local dimming feature, and poor black uniformity. These issues also make it a mediocre choice for HDR, as even though it has decent peak brightness in HDR, bright highlights don't stand out from the rest of the scene.

Pros
  • Impressive peak brightness in SDR.
  • Good reflection handling.
  • Good text clarity.
  • Image doesn't degrade when viewed from the sides.
Cons
  • Limited selection of inputs.
  • Image degrades when viewed from above.
7.8 Office

The HP X27q is a good monitor for office users. The 27-inch, 1440p screen is great for multitasking, as you can comfortably work with multiple windows open. Visibility isn't an issue in bright rooms thanks to its high peak brightness in SDR and good reflection handling. The image remains consistent when viewed from the sides, which is great for sharing your screen with someone sitting next to you, but it degrades quickly when viewed from above. Sadly, it has limited connectivity, with no USB-C ports or built-in USB hub, so you'll need an adapter if you plan on using it with an Ultrabook or MacBook that only supports USB-C.

Pros
  • Impressive peak brightness in SDR.
  • Good reflection handling.
  • Good text clarity.
  • Image doesn't degrade when viewed from the sides.
Cons
  • Limited selection of inputs.
  • Image degrades when viewed from above.
7.9 Gaming

The HP X27q delivers a very good gaming experience. It has a great response time at the max refresh rate, with just a bit of blur around fast-moving objects. It also has fantastic low input lag, ensuring a responsive gaming experience, and it supports both FreeSync and G-SYNC variable refresh rate technology. It doesn't perform as well at lower refresh rates, though, as there's much more blur around fast-moving objects. It also can't take full advantage of the PS5 or Xbox Series X, as it can't downscale a 4k image.

Pros
  • Motion looks clear at the max refresh rate.
  • Responsive gaming experience with very little input lag.
  • Fast refresh rate.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in a dark room.
  • Can't take full advantage of the PS5 or Xbox Series X.
7.2 Media Consumption

The HP X27q is a decent monitor for media consumption. It has good visibility in a bright room thanks to its high peak brightness and good reflection handling. It also has an impressive horizontal viewing angle, so you can share your screen with other people, and everyone will see the same thing. Sadly. it doesn't look as good in dark rooms, as it has a very low contrast ratio and a bad local dimming feature, so blacks look gray and there's significant blooming in dark scenes.

Pros
  • Impressive peak brightness in SDR.
  • Superb colors in SDR.
  • Good reflection handling.
  • Fantastic gradient handling.
  • Image doesn't degrade when viewed from the sides.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in a dark room.
  • Poor black uniformity.
  • Image degrades when viewed from above.
7.7 Media Creation

The HP X27q is a good monitor for media creators. The 27-inch, 1440p screen is great for creators as you can see more of your workflow or timeline at once, and it delivers good text clarity and a sharp image overall. It has great color accuracy out of the box, but there's no sRGB clamp to limit colors to the sRGB color space, so colors are a bit oversaturated. It has satisfactory ergonomics, so you can easily adjust it to an ideal viewing position.

Pros
  • Superb colors in SDR.
  • Fantastic gradient handling.
  • Good text clarity.
  • Image doesn't degrade when viewed from the sides.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in a dark room.
  • Limited selection of inputs.
  • Poor black uniformity.
  • Image degrades when viewed from above.
6.4 HDR

The HP X27q delivers a mediocre HDR experience. Colors look vivid and lifelike thanks to its wide color gamut and great HDR color volume, and it has fantastic gradient handling, with almost no noticeable banding in areas of similar color. It has decent peak brightness in HDR, but due to its low contrast ratio and a bad local dimming feature, bright highlights don't stand out the way they should.

Pros
  • Fantastic gradient handling.
  • Decent peak brightness in HDR.
Cons
  • Edge-lit local dimming system isn't very effective.
  • Blacks look gray in a dark room.
  • Poor black uniformity.
  • 7.6 Mixed Usage
  • 7.8 Office
  • 7.9 Gaming
  • 7.2 Media Consumption
  • 7.7 Media Creation
  • 6.4 HDR
  1. Updated Sep 20, 2022: Review published.
  2. Updated Sep 15, 2022: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved
No
Curve Radius
Not Curved

The HP X27q monitor has a simple design that looks good in any environment. It has slim bezels on three sides, and even the bottom bezel isn't very thick or distracting.

7.0
Design
Build Quality

The HP X27q has decent build quality. It's mostly made of plastic that feels pretty cheap, but there are no significant issues with it.

7.2
Design
Ergonomics
Height Adjustment
3.9" (10.0 cm)
Tilt Range
-20° to 5°
Rotate Portrait/Landscape
Yes, Clockwise
Swivel Range
No swivel
Wall Mount
VESA 100x100

The HP X27q monitor has satisfactory ergonomics. The height adjustment is a bit limited, but it's fairly easy to place it in an ideal viewing position. It can rotate to portrait orientation, but only in one direction, so the normally down-facing inputs always face to the left in portrait mode. The back of the monitor is pretty basic. There's no RGB bias-lighting or gamer aesthetic to it, and the stand offers no cable management.

Design
Stand
Base Width
8.5" (21.5 cm)
Base Depth
8.3" (21.2 cm)
Thickness (With Display)
6.5" (16.6 cm)
Weight (With Display)
13.7 lbs (6.2 kg)

The stand is fairly well-built, but it slides around easily and tends to wobble a lot.

Design
Display
Housing Width
24.1" (61.3 cm)
Housing Height
14.4" (36.6 cm)
Thickness (Without Stand)
2.8" (7.0 cm)
Weight (Without Stand)
8.8 lbs (4.0 kg)
Borders Size (Bezels)
0.3" (0.8 cm)
Design
Controls

Sadly, instead of a much easier-to-use joystick control, HP has opted for five fixed buttons on the back of the monitor for navigating the OSD.

Design
In The Box
Power Supply
Internal

  • Power cable
  • DisplayPort cable
  • Documentation

Picture Quality
5.9
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
1,085 : 1
Contrast With Local Dimming
704 : 1

Unfortunately, the HP X27q has a sub-par contrast ratio, so blacks look gray in a dark room. The local dimming feature is only available in HDR, which locks the backlight to max, resulting in significantly raised blacks compared to SDR.

1.0
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
Yes
Backlight
Edge

Unfortunately, although the HP X27q has a local dimming feature, it's bad. It's limited to eight single columns that span the entire height of the display, so they can't dim tightly around bright objects in dark scenes. This results in considerable blooming, and with most real content, the entire screen is lit up. The processing is pretty good, though, as there's almost no black crush, and it keeps up well with fast zone transitions. Unfortunately, it's always on in HDR, and there's no option to disable it. It can't be enabled in SDR, either.

8.1
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene
381 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
392 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
396 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
396 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
396 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
396 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
392 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
396 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
396 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
396 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
396 cd/m²
ABL
0.001
Minimum Brightness
41 cd/m²

The HP X27q has impressive peak brightness in SDR. It's bright enough to easily overcome glare in a bright room, and there's no noticeable variation in brightness with different scenes. The minimum brightness is low, which is great for working in a dark room if you're sensitive to bright lights.

These results are with the calibrated settings in the 'Custom RGB' Picture Mode with Brightness at its max.

7.1
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
VESA DisplayHDR Certification
No Certification
Real Scene
451 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
455 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
474 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
476 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
478 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
478 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
454 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
473 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
475 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
477 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
477 cd/m²
ABL
0.003

The HP X27q has decent peak brightness in HDR. It's not certified under the VESA DisplayHDR Certification program, but it easily exceeds the requirements for DisplayHDR 400. Unfortunately, it doesn't track the PQ EOTF well, as near-dark scenes are crushed, and midtones are boosted a bit higher than they should be. There's also a very sharp cutoff near the monitor's peak brightness, so bright scenes all appear at the same brightness.

There are no picture settings available in HDR, so these results are with the default modes.

8.4
Picture Quality
Horizontal Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Left
46°
Color Washout From Right
42°
Color Shift From Left
48°
Color Shift From Right
49°
Brightness Loss From Left
48°
Brightness Loss From Right
46°
Black Level Raise From Left
70°
Black Level Raise From Right
70°
Gamma Shift From Left
63°
Gamma Shift From Right
58°

The HP X27q has an impressive horizontal viewing angle. This is great for sharing your screen with someone sitting beside you, as they'll see the same thing you do. It's also useful if you like to sit close to the screen, as the sides remain uniform.

6.2
Picture Quality
Vertical Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Below
32°
Color Washout From Above
31°
Color Shift From Below
26°
Color Shift From Above
33°
Brightness Loss From Below
39°
Brightness Loss From Above
38°
Black Level Raise From Below
22°
Black Level Raise From Above
29°
Gamma Shift From Below
29°
Gamma Shift From Above
31°

Unfortunately, the vertical viewing angle is mediocre. Colors shift quickly and appear washed out as you move off-center, so it's not ideal for sharing the screen with someone standing next to you.

8.2
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
2.939%
50% DSE
0.134%

The HP X27q has great gray uniformity. The sides of the screen are a bit darker than the center, but there's very little dirty screen effect in the center, where it's usually most noticeable.

5.3
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
2.009%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
5.325%

Unfortunately, the HP X27q has poor black uniformity. There are a few bright spots along the top and bottom edges where the backlight is bleeding through. The screen also appears cloudy due to the low contrast ratio. Sadly, the local dimming feature is ineffective at improving uniformity in dark scenes due to the large zone size.

7.6
Picture Quality
Color Accuracy (Pre-Calibration)
Picture Mode
Gaming
sRGB Gamut Area xy
116.3%
White Balance dE (Avg.)
1.79
Color Temperature (Avg.)
6,446 K
Gamma (Avg.)
2.30
Color dE (Avg.)
2.33
Contrast Setting
100
RGB Settings
Default
Gamma Setting
No Gamma Setting
Brightness Setting
60
Measured Brightness
219 cd/m²
Brightness Locked
No

The HP X27q has good accuracy out of the box. The white balance is excellent, with no noticeable issues. Most colors are displayed accurately, but the monitor targets a wider color gamut than sRGB, so saturated colors appear oversaturated and there's no sRGB clamp to prevent this. The color temperature is very close to the target temperature. Gamma is a bit high, though, so most scenes are too dark.

9.8
Picture Quality
Color Accuracy (Post-Calibration)
Picture Mode
Custom RGB
sRGB Gamut Area xy
99.7%
White Balance dE (Avg.)
0.39
Color Temperature (Avg.)
6,505 K
Gamma (Avg.)
2.18
Color dE (Avg.)
0.31
Contrast Setting
100
RGB Settings
250-253-255
Gamma Setting
No Gamma Setting
Brightness Setting
15
Measured Brightness
99 cd/m²
ICC Profile
Download

The accuracy after calibration is fantastic, and there are no noticeable issues after calibrating it.

9.2
Picture Quality
SDR Color Gamut
sRGB Coverage xy
99.2%
sRGB Picture Mode
Custom RGB
Adobe RGB Coverage xy
76.4%
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Custom RGB

The HP X27q has a superb SDR color gamut. It covers the entire sRGB color space used by most desktop and web content, including most games. It can't display much of the Adobe RGB color space, though, so it's not ideal for print processing.

9.4
Picture Quality
SDR Color Volume
sRGB In ICtCp
97.3%
sRGB Picture Mode
Custom RGB
Adobe RGB In ICtCp
82.6%
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Custom RGB

The color volume in SDR is fantastic. It's mainly limited by its low contrast ratio, as it struggles to display saturated colors well in dim scenes.

7.1
Picture Quality
HDR Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI-P3 Coverage xy
84.5%
DCI-P3 Picture Mode
HDR On
Rec. 2020 Coverage xy
61.3%
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
HDR On

The HP X27q has a decent color gamut in HDR. It has satisfactory coverage of the DCI-P3 color space used by most current HDR content, including most games and movies, but it can't display the full range of greens. Coverage of the wider Rec. 2020 color space is limited, though, so it's not very future-proof.

8.3
Picture Quality
HDR Color Volume
DCI-P3 In ICtCp
85.4%
DCI-P3 Picture Mode
HDR On
Rec. 2020 In ICtCp
63.0%
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
HDR On

The HP X27q has great color volume in HDR. Colors are bright and vibrant, and it's mainly limited by its incomplete coverage of both the DCI-P3 and Rec. 2020 color spaces. It's also limited by its low contrast ratio, as it can't display dark, saturated colors well.

7.6
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Matte
Total Reflections
5.0%
Indirect Reflections
2.9%
Calculated Direct Reflections
2.1%

The HP X27q has good reflection handling, so glare isn't an issue in bright rooms. The matte anti-reflective coating reduces the intensity of direct reflections, like a lamp or an open window during the day. Unfortunately, the coating also causes a halo effect around bright lights, which makes the area around the reflection a bit hard to see.

7.5
Picture Quality
Text Clarity
Subpixel Layout
RGB

The HP X27q has good text clarity. With Windows ClearType disabled (bottom photo), diagonal lines are difficult to make out. After running the wizard (top photo), text is much sharper and easier to read. The matte coating adds a very slight haze to the screen, as you can see in the pixel photo, but it's very minor on this monitor and not noticeable.

9.7
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit

The HP X27q has fantastic gradient handling. There's almost no noticeable banding in areas of similar color.

Motion
8.5
Motion
Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
165 Hz
Max Refresh Rate
165 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over DP
165 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over HDMI
144 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over DP @ 10-bit
165 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over HDMI @ 10-Bit
75 Hz
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate (VRR)
FreeSync
Yes
G-SYNC
Compatible (Tested)
VRR Maximum
165 Hz
VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors
DisplayPort, HDMI

The HP X27q supports FreeSync variable refresh rate technology, ensuring a nearly tear-free gaming experience. It's also compatible with recent NVIDIA graphics cards, but only over DisplayPort, as it doesn't support HDMI Forum VRR. It supports Low Framerate Compensation (LFC), which is good as the panel can only adjust its minimum refresh rate down to about 55-60Hz, which means it starts multiplying frames at a much higher frame rate than most similar displays.

8.2
Motion
Response Time @ Max Refresh Rate
Recommended Overdrive Setting
Level 2 (Fast)
Rise / Fall Time
3.2 ms
Total Response Time
8.9 ms
Overshoot Error
10.4%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
4.0 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
15.2 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
46.2%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
Level 1ChartTablePhoto
Level 2ChartTablePhoto
Level 3ChartTablePhoto
Level 4ChartTablePhoto

The HP X27q has a great response time at the max response time of 165Hz. Like most gaming monitors, you can adjust the level of pixel overdrive. The 'Level 2' setting delivers the best performance overall, with a fast rise/fall time, but it's not perfect, as there's a bit of noticeable overshoot when transitioning out of dark pixels. Higher settings have a slightly faster rise/fall time, as transitions approach their final shade quicker, but there's significantly more overshoot, resulting in a long trail of inverse ghosting behind fast-moving objects. There's no overshoot with the 'Level 1' setting, but the rise/fall time is slower, so there's more blur around fast-moving objects.

7.8
Motion
Response Time @ 120Hz
Recommended Overdrive Setting
Level 1
Rise / Fall Time
6.0 ms
Total Response Time
11.2 ms
Overshoot Error
0.0%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
8.8 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
16.2 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
0.0%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
Level 1ChartTablePhoto
Level 2ChartTablePhoto
Level 3ChartTablePhoto
Level 4ChartTablePhoto

The response time at 120Hz is very good. The best overdrive mode at 120Hz is 'Level 1', as the higher settings have significantly more overshoot than they do at higher refresh rates, resulting in a long trail of inverse ghosting behind fast-moving objects. This unfortunately means that you'll likely have to change settings, as the best setting at 120Hz is different from the max refresh rate.

7.4
Motion
Response Time @ 60Hz
Recommended Overdrive Setting
Level 1
Rise / Fall Time
6.0 ms
Total Response Time
13.8 ms
Overshoot Error
0.0%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
9.0 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
18.2 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
0.0%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
Level 1ChartTablePhoto
Level 2ChartTablePhoto
Level 3ChartTablePhoto
Level 4ChartTablePhoto

The response time at 60Hz is decent. Transitions are much slower on average than they are at higher refresh rates, but it's okay for casual gaming. Like at 120Hz, the best overdrive mode is 'Level 1', as higher settings have way too much overshoot. If you have VRR enabled, the monitor will almost never actually look like this, as Low Framerate Compensation kicks in just below 60Hz, so unless your source can consistently maintain 60fps, LFC will kick in and double the frames, so it'll perform closer to the 120Hz response time.

Motion
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
Yes
Maximum Frequency
165 Hz
Minimum Frequency
120 Hz
Longest Pulse Width Brightness
465 cd/m²
Shortest Pulse Width Brightness
112 cd/m²
Pulse Width Control
Limited
Pulse Phase Control
No
Pulse Amplitude Control
No
VRR At The Same Time
No

165Hz (max):

BFI SettingMotion Blur Photo
Level 5Photo
Level 4Photo
Level 3Photo
Level 2Photo
Level 1Photo

120Hz:

BFI SettingMotion Blur Photo
Level 5Photo
Level 4Photo
Level 3Photo
Level 2Photo
Level 1Photo

The HP X27q has a versatile backlight strobing feature, commonly known as black frame insertion. You can adjust the width of each pulse, allowing you to fine-tune the brightness of the display with this feature enabled. It's limited, though, as there are only five settings available. The above photos are with the MPRT setting set to 'Level 5', with the Response Time set to 'Level 2'.

10
Motion
Image Flicker
Flicker-Free
Yes
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The backlight is completely flicker-free at all brightness levels, which is great as it helps reduce eye strain.

Inputs
9.0
Inputs
Input Lag
Native Resolution @ Max Hz
3.7 ms
Native Resolution @ 120Hz
4.8 ms
Native Resolution @ 60Hz
9.0 ms
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
3.8 ms

The HP X27q has fantastic low input lag across all supported resolutions, ensuring a responsive gaming or desktop experience.

8.0
Inputs
Resolution And Size
Native Resolution
2560 x 1440
Aspect Ratio
16:9
Megapixels
3.7 MP
Pixel Density
108 PPI
Measured Screen Diagonal
27.0"
Screen Area
313 in²
5.0
Inputs
PS5 Compatibility
4k @ 120Hz
No
4k @ 60Hz
No
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
1080p @ 60Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
No

Sadly, unlike most 1440p monitors, the HP X27q can't downscale a 4k resolution, so it can't take full advantage of the PS5. It doesn't support HDMI Forum VRR, so even though it has a variable refresh rate feature, it's not compatible with PS5.

5.8
Inputs
Xbox Series X|S Compatibility
4k @ 120Hz
No
4k @ 60Hz
No
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
1080p @ 60Hz
Yes
HDR
No
VRR
Yes

Unfortunately, this monitor can't take full advantage of the Xbox Series X. It can't downscale 4k resolutions, which also means it doesn't support HDR from the Xbox, as the Xbox only supports HDR with a 4k resolution.

Inputs
Inputs Photos
Inputs
Video And Audio Ports
DisplayPort
1 (DP 1.4)
Mini DisplayPort
No
HDMI
1 (HDMI 2.0)
HDMI 2.1 Rated Speed
No HDMI 2.1
DVI
No
VGA
No
Daisy Chaining
No
3.5mm Audio Out
1
3.5mm Audio In
No
3.5mm Microphone In
No

Unfortunately, the HP X27q has a limited selection of inputs.

Inputs
USB
USB-A Ports
0
USB-A Rated Speed
No USB-A Ports
USB-B Upstream Port
No
USB-C Ports
0
USB-C Upstream
No USB-C Ports
USB-C Rated Speed
No USB-C Ports
USB-C Power Delivery
No USB-C Ports
USB-C DisplayPort Alt Mode
No USB-C Ports
Thunderbolt
No

Sadly, there's no built-in USB hub or USB-C support, so you'll need an adapter if you want to connect your recent MacBook or Ultrabook.

Inputs
macOS Compatibility

There are no issues using this monitor with a recent MacBook or Mac Mini. Windows return to their original position when you wake your computer from sleep, but not if you have a MacBook and just close the lid.

Features
Features
Additional Features
Speakers
No
RGB Illumination
No
Multiple Input Display
No
KVM Switch
No

Unsurprisingly for a budget monitor, the HP X27q has very few additional features. It can add a virtual crosshair, display the current frame rate coming from your source, and there's a guide to help you align it with other monitors in a multi-monitor setup. It also has a low blue light mode, but this doesn't add much as most modern operating systems can do this automatically regardless of the display's capabilities.

Features
On-Screen Display (OSD)

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 27 inch HP X27q 2V7U3AA monitor, which is the only size available. There's a curved variant known as the HP X27qc, but it uses a different type of panel and performs differently. This monitor exists with two different panels, which behave slightly differently. Our unit uses an LGD LM270WQA panel, but there are reports of units with a BOE panel instead, which performs slightly worse.

Model Size Resolution Refresh Rate Panel Type Curved
X27q 27" 1440p 165Hz IPS No
X27qc 27" 1440p 165Hz VA Yes

If you come across an HP X27q with a different panel type, or if it doesn't correspond to our review, let us know in the discussions, and we'll update our review.

Our unit was manufactured in May 2021, and you can see the label here.

Compared To Other Monitors

The HP X27q is a very good budget 1440p gaming monitor, but there are much better options available at a similar price point, including the Gigabyte M27Q and the Dell S2721DGF

Also, make sure to check out our recommendations for the best budget monitors, the best gaming monitors, and the best 1440p monitors.

Gigabyte M27Q

The Gigabyte M27Q is a much better gaming monitor than the HP X27q. The Gigabyte has a faster response time, especially at lower refresh rates, resulting in much clearer motion with less blur around fast-moving objects. The Gigabyte also has better compatibility with the Xbox Series X and PS5 consoles, as it can display a downscaled 4k image.

Dell S2721DGF

The Dell S2721DGF is a bit better than the HP X27q overall. The Dell delivers a smoother gaming experience, with much less blur behind fast-moving objects. The Dell is also much more versatile, with a better stand that's easier to adjust to an ideal viewing position, and it has better connectivity, with a built-in USB hub so you can easily connect your peripherals to your PC.

Dell S2722DGM

The HP X27q is a bit better than the Dell S2722DGM. The HP has much better ergonomics, so it's easier to place it in an ideal viewing position. The HP also supports a wider range of features, including HDR, and it has much better gradient handling, so you'll see less banding in areas of similar color.

Gigabyte M32Q

The Gigabyte M32Q is a significantly better gaming monitor than the HP X27q. The Gigabyte has much better motion handling thanks to its significantly faster response time, especially at low refresh rates. The Gigabyte also has better compatibility with the Xbox Series X and PS5 consoles, as it can display a downscaled 4k image.

Discussions