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ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ Monitor Review

Tested using Methodology v1.2
Reviewed Mar 18, 2021 at 09:05 am
ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ Picture
7.9
Mixed Usage
7.9
Office
8.4
Gaming
7.5
Media Consumption
8.2
Media Creation
6.5
HDR
Size
27"
Pixel Type
IPS
Max Refresh Rate
170 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
Native Resolution
2560 x 1440
HDR10
Yes

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ is an excellent gaming monitor from ASUS's Republic of Gamers lineup. It's a refreshed version of the ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q, so the panel is largely the same but with a few minor differences. It's a 27 inch IPS monitor with a 1440p resolution, and its refresh rate can be overclocked to 170Hz. It has an incredibly fast response time, and its low input lag makes gaming feel responsive. It also supports Adaptive Sync variable refresh rate (VRR) to reduce screen tearing. While it has HDR10 support and a wide color gamut, it doesn't get bright enough to make highlights really pop in HDR content. It's best suited to moderately-lit rooms since it has good reflection handling, even though it doesn't get as bright as advertised. It's less suited to dark rooms because of its mediocre contrast. On the upside, it has wide viewing angles, which are great for sharing content or co-op gaming.

Our Verdict

7.9 Mixed Usage

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ is a great all-around monitor. Its high refresh rate, fast response time, low input lag, and VRR support make it an excellent choice for gaming. Its size and resolution are also well-suited to productivity and content creation. It doesn't perform as well in dark rooms, though, because of its low contrast ratio. HDR content also looks a bit disappointing, since the monitor can't get bright enough to make highlights pop.

Pros
  • Low input lag.
  • Large screen with high resolution.
  • Wide viewing angles.
Cons
  • Mediocre contrast ratio.
  • May struggle with glare in really bright rooms.
7.9 Office

The ASUS XG27AQ is a great office monitor. While it's intended for gaming, its size and resolution are great for multitasking and opening multiple windows side-by-side. It has good text clarity, and its wide viewing angles are ideal for sharing content. While it doesn't get very bright, it has good reflection handling to fight glare. It also has good ergonomics, so you can adjust it to your ideal viewing position.

Pros
  • Large screen with high resolution.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Good text clarity.
Cons
  • Mediocre contrast ratio.
  • May struggle with glare in really bright rooms.
8.4 Gaming

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ is an excellent gaming monitor with a ton of gaming features. It has an overclocked max refresh rate of 170Hz and a fast response time that results in smooth motion. It has a low input lag, and it supports VRR to reduce screen tearing. It also comes with extra features that gamers should appreciate, including on-screen gaming overlays and a Shadow Boost feature that improves visibility in dark scenes.

Pros
  • Incredibly fast response time.
  • Low input lag.
  • 170Hz refresh rate.
Cons
  • Mediocre contrast ratio.
7.5 Media Consumption

The ASUS XG27AQ is great for multimedia. The 27 inch size and 1440p resolution result in crisp images, and it has wide viewing angles that are well-suited to watching content with a friend. Unfortunately, the contrast ratio is mediocre, so blacks look more like gray in the dark. On the upside, it has good reflection handling so it diffuses light well in bright rooms.

Pros
  • Large screen with high resolution.
  • Exceptional color gamut.
  • Wide viewing angles.
Cons
  • Mediocre contrast ratio.
  • Black uniformity is only okay.
8.2 Media Creation

The ASUS XG27AQ is great for media creation. The 1440p resolution delivers crisp images, and its 27 inch size offers plenty of space to have windows open side-by-side. The wide horizontal viewing angles mean you don't lose image accuracy from the side. It also has an exceptionally wide SDR color gamut, including great coverage of the Adobe RGB color space used in photo editing. That said, its contrast ratio is mediocre, so blacks look more like gray in the dark.

Pros
  • Large screen with high resolution.
  • Exceptional color gamut.
  • Wide viewing angles.
Cons
  • Mediocre contrast ratio.
  • Black uniformity is only okay.
6.5 HDR

Pros
Cons
  • Mediocre contrast ratio.
  • Not bright enough to make HDR highlights pop.
  • Black uniformity is only okay.
  • 7.9 Mixed Usage
  • 7.9 Office
  • 8.4 Gaming
  • 7.5 Media Consumption
  • 8.2 Media Creation
  • 6.5 HDR
  1. Updated Jun 06, 2022: We retested the input lag after updating the Hardware Abstraction Layer through the ASUS Armoury Crate software. The input lag at the max refresh rate hasn't changed, but the 60Hz input lag is significantly lower and similar to most other high-end gaming monitors.
  2. Updated Jun 06, 2022: Updated to Test Bench 1.2, resulting in changes to the results and scores with the Response Time and Input Lag. Added tests for Console Compatibility and macOS compatibility and made minor changes to other tests, which you can see in our Changelog.
  3. Updated Mar 18, 2021: Review published.
  4. Updated Mar 15, 2021: Early access published.

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Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 27 inch ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ, which is the only size available. It's a refresh of the ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q and has very similar features and performance overall. The XG27AQ has a different stand and uses a local dimming feature with more dimming zones. It's part of the ROG Strix lineup, which also includes the ASUS ROG Strix XG27UQ, among others.

If you come across a different type of panel or your XG27AQ doesn't correspond to our review, let us know in the discussions and we'll update the review. Note that some tests, like gray uniformity, may vary between individual units.

Our unit was manufactured in December 2020. You can see the label here.

Compared To Other Monitors

The ASUS ROG Strix is an excellent gaming monitor with a high 170Hz refresh rate and 1440p resolution. It's NVIDIA-certified as G-SYNC compatible and supports FreeSync. It has an exceptionally fast response time at 60Hz, faster than most other monitors we've tested, and it remains exceptionally fast at its max refresh rate. It also has some of the widest viewing angles on any gaming monitor we've tested. For other options, see our recommendations for the best gaming monitors, the best 1440p 144Hz monitors, and the best 27 inch monitors.

ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q

The ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ are very similar monitors with similar specs. The biggest difference is that the XG27AQ has a simplified stand, and its local dimming is a little less aggressive. The XG27AQ shows less backlight bleed, resulting in better black uniformity, but this is something that can vary. The XG27AW also has slightly wider viewing angles. The XG279Q, on the other hand, gets brighter overall in SDR and HDR, so it can fight glare a little more easily and can bring out more highlights in HDR content. Otherwise, they perform very similarly and both are among the better gaming monitors we've tested, so you can't really go wrong with either.

LG 27GP850-B

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ is better than the LG 27GP850-B for most uses, but the difference is very minor. The ASUS has better ergonomics, as the stand can swivel, and it has a slightly better height and tilt range. The ASUS seems to be better built and has RGB bias-lighting on the back. On the other hand, the LG is brighter, and it has a slightly faster response time.

MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ performs very similarly to the MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD. As far as gaming goes, you can't really go wrong with either one. The MSI has a slightly faster response time at the max refresh rate while the ASUS has a slightly faster response time at 60Hz and a marginally higher refresh rate, but really, these are minor differences. While the MSI has a wider color gamut thanks to its use of Quantum Dot technology, in practice, colors can look oversaturated. The ASUS has a couple of other things that may make it preferable to some. It has wider viewing angles, so the image stays accurate from the sides, and it has much better out-of-the-box color accuracy, so you may not need to calibrate it to get the most out of your monitor. All in all, though, these are both excellent gaming monitors.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL1A

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ and the ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL1A are both great monitors, but the XG27AQ is a bit better in terms of gaming performance. It has faster response times than the VG27AQL1A at both 60Hz and the max refresh rate, so fast-moving action will look significantly smoother. While the XG27AQ doesn't get as bright, it should still be fine in moderate lighting conditions, plus it has good reflection handling. It also has much better out-of-the-box color accuracy than the VG27AQL1A, so you may not have to calibrate it to get the best possible image. The biggest downside is that its HDR performance isn't as good as the VG27AQL1A if gaming in HDR is important to you.

Gigabyte M27Q

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ and the Gigabyte M27Q are both excellent gaming monitors. They have a lot of similar features, including a 170Hz refresh rate, fast response times, and both support VRR to reduce screen tearing. If you're going to be using the monitor for content creation as well, the Gigabyte also offers greater coverage of the Adobe RGB color space, and it includes a USB-C port, allowing for more connectivity options.

Dell S2721DGF

The Dell S2721DGF and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ perform very similarly gaming-wise. The main difference is that the ASUS has a black frame insertion feature to improve motion clarity, and unlike most monitors, it can be used simultaneously with VRR. The ASUS doesn't get very bright, so it might be better to go with the Dell if you think glare might be an issue.

ASUS ROG Swift PG279QM

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ and the ASUS ROG Swift PG279QM offer very similar performance. The XG27AQ is a bit more versatile for gaming, as it has an optional backlight strobing feature, commonly known as black frame insertion, which can improve the appearance of motion. On the other hand, the PG279QM is a bit better for HDR, as it's brighter and can display a wider color gamut.

ASUS TUF VG27AQ

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ perform similarly overall, although they occupy different positions in ASUS's gaming lineup. The ROG series is meant to be more premium while the TUF series is more budget-friendly. That said, there are a few key differences between these two monitors that give the XG27AQ a slight edge, especially for gaming. The XG27AQ has a significantly faster response time than the VG27AQ at max refresh rate and especially at 60Hz. The XG27AQ also has a much wider color gamut in both SDR and HDR, and it has wider viewing angles, although the VG27AQ has better ergonomics and gets a little brighter to combat glare, so it may be better suited to an office environment.

Acer Nitro XV272U KVbmiiprzx

The Acer Nitro XV272U KVbmiiprzx and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ are nearly identical in gaming performance. They both have a 170Hz refresh rate, exceptional response times, and low input lag. The Acer has better ergonomics, and it's better for HDR, as it's brighter and can display a wider color gamut.

Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T

The Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ are quite different gaming monitors. The Samsung uses a VA panel and is available in a 27 inch or 32 inch size, while the ASUS uses an IPS panel and only comes in a 27 inch size. The Samsung has a higher refresh rate, but the difference might not be noticeable to casual players. If you like using a black frame insertion feature to improve motion clarity, only the ASUS allows you to use it simultaneously with VRR. The Samsung is better suited for dark rooms because it can produce deeper blacks, and it also gets brighter to combat glare. However, the ASUS has wider viewing angles.

Samsung Odyssey G5 S27AG50

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ and the Samsung Odyssey G5 S27AG50 are both excellent for gaming. The Samsung has a higher native 165Hz refresh rate than 144Hz on the ASUS, but you can overclock the ASUS to 170Hz. The Samsung also has native FreeSync support, while the ASUS is considered FreeSync compatible. The ASUS has a local dimming feature, which the Samsung doesn't have, but it performs terribly.

LG 27GP83B-B

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ and the LG 27GP83B-B perform very similarly, but the ASUS is a bit more robust. The ASUS has much better ergonomics, a built-in USB hub, slightly better text clarity, and it feels better-built. If those things don't matter to you, though, the LG has a slightly better response time, with less noticeable overshoot.

Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx

The Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ perform quite similarly. They both have superb response times, although the Acer has a higher refresh rate of 270Hz, versus 170Hz on the ASUS. The Acer gets significantly brighter in SDR and brighter in HDR too, and it has a wider color gamut.

ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q

The ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ are both excellent gaming monitors from ASUS's Republic of Gamers brand. One of the biggest differences is that the PG279Q has native G-SYNC support while the XG27AQ is simply G-SYNC compatible. That said, the XG27AQ has faster response times at max refresh and especially at 60Hz, resulting in exceptionally clear motion. While the PG279Q has a marginally higher contrast ratio, the XG27AQ experiences less backlight bleed resulting in more uniform blacks, which is good if you prefer to game in the dark. That said, black uniformity can vary between individual units. The XG27AQ also supports HDR while the PG279Q doesn't, although its HDR experience is a bit lackluster because it doesn't get very bright for HDR content.

LG 32GP850-B

The LG 32GP850-B and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ are very similar overall. the ASUS has better ergonomics, with a wider tilt range, better height adjustment, and it can swivel. On the other hand, the LG has higher peak brightness, better reflection handling, and a slightly faster refresh rate.

LG 27GN950-B

The LG 27GN950-B and the ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ are both impressive gaming monitors with different resolutions. The ASUS is a 1440p monitor, while the LG is a 4k monitor that delivers a sharper image. The LG also has a slightly faster response time, delivering exceptionally smooth motion, although its refresh rate maxes out at 160Hz whereas the ASUS can reach 170Hz. Both have VRR support and low input lag. While the LG has a slight edge when it comes to performance, the ASUS feels better built and has better ergonomics and reflection handling, if these are important to you. 

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Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved
No
Curve Radius
Not Curved

The ASUS XG27AQ is gamer-oriented with an RGB lighting zone on the back where the ROG logo is. It has a flat screen and a sleek but simple design. Overall, it feels well-built and has some heft to it. Aside from the stand, it looks very similar to the ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q.

8.0
Design
Build Quality

The ASUS XG27AQ feels well-built. Its heavier weight gives it a sturdy feel, and there's almost no flex at all. It feels great overall, and there aren't any obvious gaps or issues in build quality.

8.5
Design
Ergonomics
Height Adjustment
4.7" (12.0 cm)
Tilt Range
-20° to 5°
Rotate Portrait/Landscape
Yes, Clockwise
Swivel Range
-25° to 25°
Wall Mount
VESA 100x100

The ASUS XG27AQ has good ergonomics. You can adjust the height and rotate the screen clockwise into portrait mode. The swivel range isn't the widest, but it has a broad tilt range, so you shouldn't have trouble finding a suitable viewing position. The back is solid plastic with an etched pattern covering half of the back panel. The ROG logo lights up, and there's a cutout in the stand for cable management.

Design
Stand
Base Width
24.4" (62.1 cm)
Base Depth
10.4" (26.3 cm)
Thickness (With Display)
10.9" (27.7 cm)
Weight (With Display)
19.6 lbs (8.9 kg)

The stand's feet are made of metal and feel very solid, so the monitor feels well-supported. It has a fairly wide footprint but still leaves some desk space in front. It differs from the ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q, which has a unique tripod stand.

Design
Display
Size
27"
Housing Width
24.1" (61.1 cm)
Housing Height
14.4" (36.5 cm)
Thickness (Without Stand)
3.4" (8.6 cm)
Weight (Without Stand)
11.7 lbs (5.3 kg)
Borders Size (Bezels)
0.3" (0.8 cm)
Design
Controls

The controls are on the back of the monitor and include a joystick and four buttons to navigate the on-screen display.

Design
In The Box
Power Supply
External Brick

  • Power cable
  • DisplayPort cable
  • HDMI cable
  • USB-B to USB-A upstream cable
  • User manual
  • Calibration report

Picture Quality
6.2
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
1,121 : 1
Contrast With Local Dimming
1,117 : 1

The contrast ratio on the ASUS XG27AQ is not bad. It's a touch higher than the advertised 1000:1 ratio, but since it uses an IPS panel, it's still not that high, so blacks appear more grayish in the dark. It's important to remember that contrast can vary between units. The backlight is edge-lit, so the local dimming doesn't have much effect on our checkerboard test pattern because it senses the brighter areas of the checkerboard and turns all the dimming zones on.

1.0
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
Yes
Backlight
Edge

Like most monitors with local dimming, the local dimming feature on the ASUS XG27AQ is bad, producing a lot of blooming and uniformity issues. The zones are large and edge-lit, so the transitions between them are very slow and obvious. Because the zones are so large, they don't light up on small bright objects, as seen with the small squares in our test video. As you can see, some of the zones in the middle don't light up if an object is moving too fast. There isn't much black crush because it simply raises the black level overall, but the zones themselves light up and make the image look worse. The local dimming feature is enabled by turning on Dynamic Dimming.

7.2
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene
269 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
223 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
274 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
280 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
295 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
297 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
221 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
274 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
280 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
295 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
297 cd/m²
ABL
0.018
Minimum Brightness
44 cd/m²

The ASUS XG27AQ has decent SDR peak brightness, although it's significantly lower than the advertised 400 nits. It's possible to achieve brightness closer to the advertised peak brightness by setting Brightness to max, adjusting the Color Temperature to '100-100-100' and changing the Gamma to '1.8'. Otherwise, it doesn't get anywhere near 400 nits in SDR.

We measured the peak brightness after calibration in the 'Racing' Picture Mode with Brightness set to max and Dynamic Dimming turned on.

6.5
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
VESA DisplayHDR Certification
DisplayHDR 400
Real Scene
349 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
309 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
378 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
387 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
406 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
408 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
305 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
376 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
384 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
404 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
407 cd/m²
ABL
0.017

The ASUS XG27AQ gets reasonably bright in HDR. It's bright enough to meet the advertised DisplayHDR 400 specification, although it's not the most consistent across different content.

We measured the HDR peak brightness using the 'ASUS Gaming HDR' Picture Mode, in which Dynamic Dimming is automatically enabled.

8.8
Picture Quality
Horizontal Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Left
46°
Color Washout From Right
50°
Color Shift From Left
67°
Color Shift From Right
57°
Brightness Loss From Left
50°
Brightness Loss From Right
51°
Black Level Raise From Left
70°
Black Level Raise From Right
70°
Gamma Shift From Left
63°
Gamma Shift From Right
63°

The ASUS XG27AQ has excellent horizontal viewing angles, among the widest viewing angles we've tested on a monitor. The image remains accurate even when viewed at an angle.

6.8
Picture Quality
Vertical Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Below
31°
Color Washout From Above
35°
Color Shift From Below
47°
Color Shift From Above
38°
Brightness Loss From Below
38°
Brightness Loss From Above
40°
Black Level Raise From Below
48°
Black Level Raise From Above
44°
Gamma Shift From Below
34°
Gamma Shift From Above
34°

The vertical viewing angles are okay, but there's some color shift and overall loss of accuracy when viewing from above or below.

8.3
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
2.082%
50% DSE
0.137%

The ASUS XG27AQ has amazing gray uniformity, though this can vary between individual units. The corners and edges appear slightly darker, but overall it's very uniform, and there's very little dirty screen effect. Uniformity is even better in darker scenes.

6.5
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
1.107%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
4.699%

Black uniformity on the ASUS XG27AQ is okay. There's a bit of backlight bleed near the edges and clouding in the center, as well as some blooming around bright objects, but overall it's not bad. With local dimming enabled, the sides of the screen are darker, but the lighting zones make it look less even.

8.6
Picture Quality
Color Accuracy (Pre-Calibration)
Picture Mode
sRGB
sRGB Gamut Area xy
99.5%
White Balance dE (Avg.)
3.49
Color Temperature (Avg.)
6,466 K
Gamma (Avg.)
2.23
Color dE (Avg.)
2.24
Contrast Setting
N/A
RGB Settings
Default
Gamma Setting
Default
Brightness Setting
N/A
Measured Brightness
173 cd/m²
Brightness Locked
Yes

The ASUS XG27AQ has great out-of-the-box color accuracy, although this may vary between units. The white balance is decent and most colors are only slightly off. Gamma follows the curve fairly well in brighter scenes, although darker scenes are darker than they should be. The color temperature is a bit cooler than our target, so images have a blue-ish tint. There's an 'sRGB' Picture Mode, but we used the 'Racing Mode' instead, as it was more accurate.

9.8
Picture Quality
Color Accuracy (Post-Calibration)
Picture Mode
Racing Mode
sRGB Gamut Area xy
99.3%
White Balance dE (Avg.)
0.42
Color Temperature (Avg.)
6,491 K
Gamma (Avg.)
2.18
Color dE (Avg.)
0.38
Contrast Setting
80
RGB Settings
100-94-94
Gamma Setting
2.2
Brightness Setting
13
Measured Brightness
98 cd/m²
ICC Profile
Download

After calibration, the accuracy is fantastic. You shouldn't be able to notice any remaining inaccuracies without a colorimeter. Gamma is much closer to the target, although really dark and really bright scenes may still be a little too bright. The color temperature is nearly perfect.

9.4
Picture Quality
SDR Color Gamut
sRGB Coverage xy
99.1%
sRGB Picture Mode
Racing
Adobe RGB Coverage xy
84.6%
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Racing

The ASUS XG27AQ has an incredible SDR color gamut, with nearly full coverage of the commonly used sRGB color space and great coverage of the Adobe RGB color space used in photo editing.

9.7
Picture Quality
SDR Color Volume
sRGB In ICtCp
99.1%
sRGB Picture Mode
Racing
Adobe RGB In ICtCp
90.7%
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Racing

The ASUS ROG XG27AQ has incredible color volume. It can display a wide range of colors at various luminance levels, although it can struggle a bit with very dark, saturated colors due to its mediocre contrast ratio. It fills out more colors at lower luminance levels than the ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q, likely because of its less aggressive local dimming.

8.5
Picture Quality
HDR Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI-P3 Coverage xy
93.3%
DCI-P3 Picture Mode
Asus Gaming HDR
Rec. 2020 Coverage xy
69.8%
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
Asus Gaming HDR

The ASUS XG27AQ has a decent HDR color gamut. It's considered wide for HDR content, but it only has decent coverage of both the DCI P3 color space and the wider Rec. 2020 color space. If you want a monitor with a wider HDR color gamut, check out the Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx.

7.5
Picture Quality
HDR Color Volume
DCI-P3 In ICtCp
75.7%
DCI-P3 Picture Mode
Asus Gaming HDR
Rec. 2020 In ICtCp
68.5%
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
Asus Gaming HDR

HDR color volume is decent. As with SDR, it has some trouble displaying dark, saturated colors.

7.5
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Matte
Total Reflections
5.2%
Indirect Reflections
2.9%
Calculated Direct Reflections
2.3%

The ASUS XG27AQ has good reflection handling. It diffuses direct light well and is decent at diffusing indirect light, but it's best suited to moderately lit environments.

7.5
Picture Quality
Text Clarity
Pixel Type
IPS
Subpixel Layout
RGB

The ASUS XG27AQ has good text clarity. With ClearType enabled (top photo), the appearance of diagonal and curved lines is improved, as seen in the R, N, G, and S.

9.2
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit

Gradient handling is superb and banding is hardly noticeable.

Motion
8.6
Motion
Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
144 Hz
Max Refresh Rate
170 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over DP
170 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over HDMI
144 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over DP @ 10-bit
120 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over HDMI @ 10-Bit
60 Hz
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate (VRR)
FreeSync
Compatible (Tested)
G-SYNC
Compatible (NVIDIA Certified)
VRR Maximum
170 Hz
VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors
DisplayPort, HDMI
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes

The monitor has a native 144Hz refresh rate that can be overclocked from 155Hz up to 170Hz. It has Adaptive Sync VRR, so it's compatible with FreeSync and is certified G-SYNC compatible. The max refresh rate you can achieve over HDMI is 144Hz, and G-SYNC only works over a DisplayPort connection.

8.9
Motion
Response Time @ Max Refresh Rate
Recommended Overdrive Setting
Level 1
Rise / Fall Time
3.6 ms
Total Response Time
7.3 ms
Overshoot Error
2.1%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
6.0 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
11.1 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
10.2%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
level-0ChartTablePhoto
level-1ChartTablePhoto
level-2ChartTablePhoto
level-3ChartTablePhoto
level-4ChartTablePhoto
level-5ChartTablePhoto

The ASUS ROG XG27AQ has a remarkably fast response time at its max refresh rate. The best overdrive setting is 'Level 2' because it's faster than levels 0 and 1, but there isn't as much overshoot as levels 3, 4, and 5. If overshoot bothers you, 'Level 0' has none but has a slower response time.

8.5
Motion
Response Time @ 120Hz
Recommended Overdrive Setting
Level 1
Rise / Fall Time
3.5 ms
Total Response Time
9.3 ms
Overshoot Error
3.9%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
5.8 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
13.3 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
15.1%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
level-0ChartTablePhoto
level-1ChartTablePhoto
level-2ChartTablePhoto
level-3ChartTablePhoto
level-4ChartTablePhoto
level-5ChartTablePhoto

8.0
Motion
Response Time @ 60Hz
Recommended Overdrive Setting
Level 0
Rise / Fall Time
5.1 ms
Total Response Time
12 ms
Overshoot Error
0.0%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
7.3 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
17.5 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
0.0%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
level-0ChartTablePhoto
level-1ChartTablePhoto
level-2ChartTablePhoto
level-3ChartTablePhoto
level-4ChartTablePhoto
level-5ChartTablePhoto

At 60Hz, the ASUS XG27AQ still has a remarkable response time, although it's marginally slower than at its max refresh rate. Surprisingly, the response time gets incrementally better between overdrive settings 2 and 4 but gets dramatically worse when it's set to 'Level 5'. The recommended overdrive setting at 60Hz, however, is 'Level 0' because it results in the fastest response time and has no overshoot.

Motion
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
Yes
Maximum Frequency
170 Hz
Minimum Frequency
80 Hz
Longest Pulse Width Brightness
160 cd/m²
Shortest Pulse Width Brightness
160 cd/m²
Pulse Width Control
No
Pulse Phase Control
No
Pulse Amplitude Control
No
VRR At The Same Time
Yes

Refresh RateVRR SettingMotion Blur Photo
MaxOnPhoto
OffPhoto
120HzOnPhoto
OffPhoto

The ASUS XG27AQ has an optional Black Frame Insertion (BFI) feature, also known as backlight strobing. On this monitor, the feature is called 'ELMB Sync', and it reduces motion blur by flickering the backlight between frames. It works with VRR enabled without affecting the input lag, but you can't adjust the overdrive settings while it's on. To read more about BFI and how we test it, see here.

10
Motion
Image Flicker
Flicker-Free
Yes
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The ASUS XG27AQ has a flicker-free backlight, which helps to reduce eye strain.

Inputs
9.1
Inputs
Input Lag
Native Resolution @ Max Hz
3.2 ms
Native Resolution @ 120Hz
4.4 ms
Native Resolution @ 60Hz
8.4 ms
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
3.3 ms

The ASUS XG27AQ has an incredibly low input lag. Enabling BFI doesn't add input lag. The BFI input lag was measured at 170Hz.

8.0
Inputs
Resolution And Size
Native Resolution
2560 x 1440
Aspect Ratio
16:9
Megapixels
3.7 MP
Pixel Density
109 PPI
Measured Screen Diagonal
27.0"
Screen Area
310 in²

The ASUS XG27AQ is a 27 inch monitor with a great 1440p resolution, resulting in a high pixel density. That means you can open multiple windows side-by-side, and the image looks sharp and clear.

7.0
Inputs
PS5 Compatibility
4k @ 120Hz
No
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
1440p @ 120Hz
PS5 doesn't output 1440p
1440p @ 60Hz
PS5 doesn't output 1440p
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
1080p @ 60Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
No
9.2
Inputs
Xbox Series X|S Compatibility
4k @ 120Hz
No
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
1080p @ 60Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
Yes
Inputs
Inputs Photos
Inputs
Video And Audio Ports
DisplayPort
1 (DP 1.2)
Mini DisplayPort
No
HDMI
2 (HDMI 2.0)
HDMI 2.1 Rated Speed
No HDMI 2.1
DVI
No
VGA
No
Daisy Chaining
No
3.5mm Audio Out
1
3.5mm Audio In
No
HDR10
Yes
3.5mm Microphone In
No
Inputs
USB
USB-A Ports
3 (2x USB, 1x Service Port Only)
USB-A Rated Speed
5Gbps (USB 3.2 Gen 1)
USB-B Upstream Port
Yes
USB-C Ports
0
USB-C Upstream
No USB-C Ports
USB-C Rated Speed
No USB-C Ports
USB-C Power Delivery
No USB-C Ports
USB-C DisplayPort Alt Mode
No USB-C Ports
Thunderbolt
No
Inputs
macOS Compatibility

There are a few minor issues when using this monitor with a recent MacBook Pro, but it works well overall. The variable refresh rate feature works, but only in-game, as it constantly flickers when you're on the desktop. HDR is also a bit dimmer than usual, but it works. It recovers properly from sleep mode, but windows sometimes won't go back to their original position.

Features
Features
Additional Features
Speakers
Yes
RGB Illumination
Controllable
Multiple Input Display
No
KVM Switch
No

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ has many extra features, including adjustable RGB lighting and built-in speakers. It also includes:

  • Shadow Boost: Makes objects in dark areas more visible.
  • GameVisual: Seven pre-set picture modes.
  • GamePlus: Includes virtual crosshairs, sniper, FPS counter, and display alignment.
  • Ultra-Low Blue Light (5 levels): Removes blue light to help reduce eye strain.

Features
On-Screen Display (OSD)

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