LG 48 C1 OLED Monitor Review

Tested using Methodology v1.1
Reviewed Jun 25, 2021 at 10:02 am
LG 48 C1 OLED Picture
8.5
Mixed Usage
8.3
Office
8.8
Gaming
8.6
Multimedia
8.2
Media Creation
8.8
HDR Gaming
Size 48"
Resolution 3840x2160
Max Refresh Rate
120 Hz
Pixel Type
OLED
Variable Refresh Rate
FreeSync

The LG 48 C1 OLED is a TV that we tested as a monitor, replacing the LG 48 CX OLED from 2020. As it's a TV, it has many different features than most typical monitors. It has a large 48 inch screen, but that means it has a lower pixel density and, combined with its unique WBGR subpixel layout, text clarity isn't the best. It's advertised as a gaming monitor and has features that most gamers should enjoy. It has a 120Hz panel with FreeSync variable refresh rate (VRR) support and G-SYNC compatibility to reduce screen tearing. There are four HDMI 2.1 inputs, so you can play 4k games up to 120fps if you have a compatible graphics card, but it doesn't have a DisplayPort input. Its OLED panel can turn off individual pixels, resulting in a near-infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. However, OLEDs have the risk of permanent burn-in, which could be problematic with constant exposure to the UI elements, so we suggest using a screensaver, hiding the taskbar, or watching varied content if you're going to use it purely as a monitor.

Note: We tested the 55 inch model as a TV, which you can read about here. However, the results of the two reviews aren't comparable because of the different ways we score and test TVs and monitors.

Our Verdict

8.5 Mixed Usage

The LG C1 48 is an excellent overall TV that we tested as a monitor. Since it has a ton more features than a normal monitor, it excels in a few areas. It's excellent for gaming because it has VRR support, a very quick response time, and low input lag. It's a fantastic choice for watching content in dark rooms due to its near-infinite contrast and perfect black uniformity. It's great for office use or content creators because it has a large screen, but text clarity is just decent as the WRGB subpixel layout isn't ideal.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Very wide viewing angles.
  • 120Hz panel with FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility.
  • Near-infinite contrast and perfect black uniformity.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • Gets less bright in 'Game' mode than other picture modes.
  • Lacks a DisplayPort input.
  • WBGR layout results in just decent text clarity; can be improved with scaling.
8.3 Office

The LG C1 48 is great for office use. The large screen lets you open multiple windows, but text clarity isn't the best due to the WRGB subpixel layout. It's good to use in well-lit rooms as it has fantastic reflection handling, even though it doesn't get extremely bright in 'Game' mode. The wide viewing angles are also great for sharing your screen with others around you.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Very wide viewing angles.
  • Exceptional motion handling.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • WBGR layout results in just decent text clarity; can be improved with scaling.
8.8 Gaming

The LG C1 48 is excellent for gaming. It has a 120Hz panel with HDMI 2.1 inputs, allowing you to play 4k games up to 120fps from an HDMI 2.1 compatible graphics card. It has native FreeSync VRR and G-SYNC compatibility. Its response time is near-instant, and it has low input lag. It's fantastic for dark room gaming thanks to its near-infinite contrast and perfect black uniformity.

Pros
  • 120Hz panel with FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility.
  • Four HDMI 2.1 inputs.
  • Near-infinite contrast and perfect black uniformity.
  • Exceptional motion handling.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • Gets less bright in 'Game' mode than other picture modes.
  • Lacks a DisplayPort input.
8.6 Multimedia

The LG C1 48 is excellent for consuming multimedia content. The 48 inch screen is big enough for an immersive viewing experience, and it has wide viewing angles in case you want to share the screen with someone else. It has a near-infinite contrast, so blacks look deep and inky, and there's no blooming around bright objects.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Very wide viewing angles.
  • Near-infinite contrast and perfect black uniformity.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
8.2 Media Creation

The LG C1 48 is great for content creators. It has a big enough screen that you can open multiple windows, and you can view your entire video timeline without scrolling too much. It displays perfect blacks if you tend to use it in a dark room, and it has fantastic reflection handling for a well-lit room. Although its Adobe RGB color space coverage is good, there are better monitors for it, and text clarity isn't the best.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Very wide viewing angles.
  • Exceptional motion handling.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • WBGR layout results in just decent text clarity; can be improved with scaling.
8.8 HDR Gaming

The LG C1 48 is excellent for HDR gaming. It has a ton of gaming features like VRR support, HDMI 2.1 inputs, a near-instant response time, and low input lag. It displays a wide color gamut for HDR content and has a near-infinite contrast ratio, and even though OLEDs don't get extremely bright, it's still better than most monitors, and enough to deliver a satisfying HDR experience.

Pros
  • 120Hz panel with FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility.
  • Four HDMI 2.1 inputs.
  • Near-infinite contrast and perfect black uniformity.
  • Exceptional motion handling.
  • Displays wide color gamut.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • Gets less bright in 'Game' mode than other picture modes.
  • Lacks a DisplayPort input.
  • 8.5 Mixed Usage
  • 8.3 Office
  • 8.8 Gaming
  • 8.6 Multimedia
  • 8.2 Media Creation
  • 8.8 HDR Gaming
  1. Updated Jul 08, 2021: Updated the text to better reflect how we expect most people to use the TV.

Video

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved No
Curve Radius Not Curved
Weight (without stand)
34.2 lbs (15.5 kg)
Weight (with stand)
42.3 lbs (19.2 kg)

The LG C1 48 is a premium TV with a nice design. Since it's a TV, it looks different than any monitor as it comes with a metal center stand that raises the screen off the table a bit. It has thin bezels all around and should look good in any setup.

Design
Stand
Width
31.9" (81.0 cm)
Depth
11.1" (28.3 cm)

The LG C1 48's stand is wide and supports the screen well. It has a very wide footprint, bigger than most monitors, so you need a large table to place it on. It raises the screen enough that you can put a keyboard or mouse in front without getting in the way of the screen.

0
Design
Ergonomics
Height Adjustment
0.0" (0.0 cm)
Switch Portrait/Landscape No
Swivel Range No swivel
Tilt Range No Tilt

As is the case with most TVs, the stand of the LG C1 48 doesn't offer any ergonomic adjustments.

Design
Back
Wall Mount VESA 300x200

The back of the LG C1 48 is made of metal on top, and the part where the inputs are is plastic. Luckily, you can run your cables through the stand to keep your setup clean.

Design
Borders
Borders
0.4" (0.9 cm)
Design
Thickness
Thickness (with stand)
8.2" (20.8 cm)
Thickness (without stand)
1.9" (4.7 cm)
9.0
Design
Build Quality

The LG 48 C1 feels extremely well-built. It's made out of metal and solid plastic and feels premium throughout. There's no noticeable flex and the screen is very stable on the stand.

Picture Quality
10
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
Inf : 1
Contrast With Local Dimming
N/A

OLEDs like the LG C1 48 can turn off individual pixels, resulting in a near-infinite contrast ratio. Blacks look deep and inky when viewed in the dark.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

Since the LG C1 48 can turn off each pixel and doesn't have a backlight, it doesn't have a local dimming feature. It produces perfect blacks with no visible blooming; the video above is provided for reference.

6.2
Picture Quality
SDR Peak Brightness
SDR Real Scene
210 cd/m²
SDR Peak 2% Window
225 cd/m²
SDR Peak 10% Window
225 cd/m²
SDR Peak 25% Window
226 cd/m²
SDR Peak 50% Window
226 cd/m²
SDR Peak 100% Window
164 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 2% Window
213 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 10% Window
215 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 25% Window
216 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 50% Window
217 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 100% Window
116 cd/m²
SDR ABL
0.023

The LG C1 48 has mediocre SDR peak brightness. This is somewhat normal for an OLED, but it's an improvement over the LG 48 CX OLED. It's not bright enough to fight glare in really well-lit rooms. We tested the brightness after calibration in the 'Game Optimizer' Picture Mode with the input labeled as 'PC'. The Peak Brightness setting is disabled with either of these settings enabled.

We also measured the real scene brightness using other settings:

Picture Mode Calibrated PC Label Peak Brightness Real Scene Brightness
Game Calibrated Yes N/A 210 cd/m²
Game Calibrated No N/A 211 cd/m²
Game Uncalibrated Yes N/A 205 cd/m²
Expert (dark space, night) Uncalibrated Yes N/A 270 cd/m²
Expert (dark space, night) Uncalibrated No High 283 cd/m²

So overall, using the 'Game Optimizer' Picture Mode and labeling the input as 'PC' results in a dimmer image, and the Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL) is a bit more aggressive than outside of 'Game' mode. In other picture modes, you can get a brighter screen at the cost of input lag, but for most people, it's more important to have low input lag when using it as a monitor.

7.6
Picture Quality
HDR Peak Brightness
HDR Real Scene
714 cd/m²
HDR Peak 2% Window
790 cd/m²
HDR Peak 10% Window
791 cd/m²
HDR Peak 25% Window
432 cd/m²
HDR Peak 50% Window
256 cd/m²
HDR Peak 100% Window
128 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 2% Window
736 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 10% Window
735 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 25% Window
407 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 50% Window
242 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 100% Window
122 cd/m²
HDR ABL
0.113

The LG C1 48 has good HDR peak brightness. It gets extremely bright with small highlights, but it gets dimmer with larger areas of bright colors due to the aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).

We tested the HDR brightness in the 'Game Optimizer' HDR Picture Mode with Peak Brightness set to 'High'. Don't compare it to the TV review because we tested it using different settings, and the scoring is different between monitors and TVs.

9.1
Picture Quality
Horizontal Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Left
54°
Color Washout From Right
58°
Color Shift From Left
36°
Color Shift From Right
37°
Brightness Loss From Left
67°
Brightness Loss From Right
70°
Black Level Raise From Left
70°
Black Level Raise From Right
70°
Gamma Shift From Left
69°
Gamma Shift From Right
70°

The LG C1 48 has fantastic horizontal viewing angles. The image remains accurate if you view it from the side, or if you sit too close

Note: These results vary from the TV review because of the different ways we test monitors and TVs.

9.4
Picture Quality
Vertical Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Below
68°
Color Washout From Above
66°
Color Shift From Below
37°
Color Shift From Above
36°
Brightness Loss From Below
70°
Brightness Loss From Above
70°
Black Level Raise From Below
70°
Black Level Raise From Above
70°
Gamma Shift From Below
70°
Gamma Shift From Above
70°

Once again, the LG 48 C1 has very wide vertical viewing angles. The top and bottom edges remain accurate if you sit close.

Note: These results vary from the TV review because of the different ways we test monitors and TVs.

9.2
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
1.139%
50% DSE
0.086%
5% Std. Dev.
0.443%
5% DSE
0.067%

The gray uniformity of the LG C1 48 is fantastic. Solid colors look uniform across the screen, and there's hardly any dirty screen effect in the center. In near-dark scenes, there are some extremely faint horizontal and vertical lines, which is typical of OLEDs, but they're hard to see. Also, these results differ from the TV review because uniformity can vary between units.

10
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
0.121%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

As the LG C1 48 can turn off individual pixels, black uniformity is perfect and there's no blooming around bright objects.

7.2
Picture Quality
Pre Calibration
Picture Mode
Cinema
Luminance
204 cd/m²
Luminance Settings
100
Contrast Setting
85
RGB Controls
0-0-0
Gamma Setting
2.2
Color Temperature
6,938 K
White Balance dE
2.89
Color dE
3.58
Gamma
2.27

The LG C1 48 has decent out-of-the-box accuracy. Most colors are slightly inaccurate, and white balance is a bit off too. However, neither are really bad. Color temperature is on the cold side, giving the image a warm tint, and gamma doesn't follow the sRGB very well. Dark scenes are darker than intended, and bright scenes are too bright. Keep in mind that accuracy can vary between units.

Note: These results vary from the TV review because of the different ways we test monitors and TVs.

9.6
Picture Quality
Post Calibration
Picture Mode
Game Optimizer
Luminance
99 cd/m²
Luminance Settings
38
Contrast Setting
85
RGB Controls
High (8-0-(-7)), Low (0-0-0)
Gamma Setting
2.2
Color Temperature
6,488 K
White Balance dE
0.54
Color dE
0.58
Gamma
2.19

The LG C1 48 has exceptional accuracy after calibration. Any remaining white balance and color inaccuracies can't be spotted by the human eye, and color temperature is extremely close to our 6500K target. Gamma improved, but it's still not perfect.

You can download our ICC profile calibration here. This is provided for reference only and shouldn't be used, as the calibration values vary per individual unit even for the same model due to manufacturing tolerances.

8.7
Picture Quality
SDR Color Gamut
sRGB xy
98.8%
Adobe RGB xy
75.1%
sRGB Picture Mode
Game Optimizer
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Game Optimizer

The LG C1 48's SDR color gamut is excellent. It has near-perfect coverage of the commonly-used sRGB color space, and it has good coverage of the Adobe RGB color space, which is used in photo editing.

9.1
Picture Quality
SDR Color Volume
sRGB In ICtCp
99.2%
Adobe RGB In ICtCp
83.0%
sRGB Picture Mode
Game Optimizer
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Game Optimizer

The LG C1 48 has fantastic SDR color volume. It displays dark colors well thanks to its near-infinite contrast. Despite its less-than-ideal peak brightness, it displays bright colors well.

8.1
Picture Quality
HDR Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI P3 xy
91.0%
Rec. 2020 xy
70.2%
DCI P3 Picture Mode
Game Optimizer
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
Game Optimizer

The LG 48 C1 has a great HDR color gamut. It covers both the DCI P3 and Rec. 2020 color spaces well, but tone mapping is off, so colors don't look as accurate as they're supposed to.

Note: The DCI P3 color space results differ between this and the TV review because of the way we test TVs and monitors. On monitors, we send a Rec. 2020 signal, limiting it to the DCI P3 primaries, to measure the coverage. However, on TVs, we send a Rec. 2020 signal and estimate the DCI P3 color space from that.

6.8
Picture Quality
HDR Color Volume
DCI-P3 In ICtCp
78.9%
Rec. 2020 In ICtCp
57.8%
DCI P3 Picture Mode
Game Optimizer
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
Game Optimizer

The LG 48 C1 has okay HDR color volume. It displays dark colors well thanks to the high contrast, but struggles with brighter colors.

Note: These results vary from the TV review because of the different ways we test monitors and TVs.

8.9
Picture Quality
Image Retention
IR After 0 Min Recovery
0.34%
IR After 2 Min Recovery
0.09%
IR After 4 Min Recovery
0.07%
IR After 6 Min Recovery
0.04%
IR After 8 Min Recovery
0.00%
IR After 10 Min Recovery
0.00%

Our unit of the LG C1 48 shows some signs of temporary image retention, but it's minor, and it disappears within a few minutes. The image retention isn't only noticeable with our test pattern, as we noticed it with static elements from our warm-up video, which you can see in the top left and right corners in this photo.

Image retention is different from permanent burn-in that OLED TVs may experience. We don't score this as part of our monitor test bench, but it could be problematic while using the TV as a monitor because there are a ton of static elements from the user interface. We suggest using a screensaver, hiding the taskbar, and watching varied content to help reduce this issue. LG also has a few settings to help with it, which you can read about here.

9.1
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit

The gradient handling is fantastic. Banding is minimal throughout, but it's a bit more noticeable in the darker shades. The LG 48 C1 has a Smooth Gradation setting, but we didn't test it.

Note: These results vary from the TV review because of the different ways we test monitors and TVs.

9.7
Picture Quality
Color Bleed
Pixel Row Error
0.027%
Pixel Column Error
0.041%

The LG C1 48 has some minor signs of color bleed when displaying solid areas of uniform color. It's not noticeable with most content, but it isn't ideal for photo editors.

9.1
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Glossy
Total Reflections
1.4%
Indirect Reflections
0.1%
Calculated Direct Reflections
1.3%

The LG C1 48 has fantastic reflection handling. Thanks to the glossy finish, light is absorbed really well, and even glare from strong light sources shouldn't be too distracting. The final score is different from the TV review because total reflections are counted in the scoring for TVs, but the individual results are similar between each.

7.0
Picture Quality
Text Clarity
Sub-Pixel Layout
WBGR

The LG 48 C1 has decent text clarity. Using a TV is different from a typical monitor because pixel density is lower, and there are different scaling options. Also, the WBGR subpixel layout isn't used by most programs. Windows suggests 300% scaling, which is just too large for most people, so the photos above are with 100% scaling. Enabling ClearType (top photo) helps improve the boldness of the letters, but it's still not ideal.

We took a photo of the text clarity at different scaling options, which you can see below.

Scaling ClearType On ClearType Off
125% ClearType On ClearType Off
150% ClearType On ClearType Off
175% ClearType On ClearType Off

The pixel photo above is with the blue, white, and, red subpixels turned on. It uses a WBGR sub-pixel layout, and all four pixels are never on at the same time. We took photos of the other pixel combinations:

Motion
9.9
Motion
Response Time @ Max Refresh Rate
Best Overdrive Setting
No Overdrive
Rise / Fall Time
0.8 ms
Total Response Time
2.1 ms
Overshoot Error
0.9%
Dark Rise / Fall Time
0.8 ms
Dark Total Response Time
3.6 ms
Dark Overshoot Error
3.2%

Overdrive Setting Response Time Chart Response Time Tables Motion Blur Photo
No Overdrive Chart Table Photo

The LG C1 48 has a near-instant response time at its max refresh rate of 120Hz, resulting in smooth motion. There's only a bit of overshoot in dark transitions, but it's hardly noticeable. Unlike most monitors, there aren't any overdrive settings.

Note: These results aren't comparable to the TV review because the response time tests are different between TVs and monitors.

9.9
Motion
Response Time @ 60Hz
Best Overdrive Setting
No Overdrive
Rise / Fall Time
0.8 ms
Total Response Time
3.4 ms
Overshoot Error
0.9%
Dark Rise / Fall Time
0.8 ms
Dark Total Response Time
6.7 ms
Dark Overshoot Error
3.1%

Overdrive Setting Response Time Chart Response Time Tables Motion Blur Photo
No Overdrive Chart Table Photo

Once again, the response time of the LG 48 C1 at 60Hz is near-instant. Some darker transitions are slightly slower, but motion looks excellent overall.

10
Motion
Image Flicker
Flicker-Free No
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The LG 48 C1 doesn't use Pulse Width Modulation (PWM). There's a slight dip in brightness every 8ms, which coincides with the 120Hz refresh rate, and it's not noticeable either. The scaling of the graph is different from the TV review, but there's still the same effect.

8.9
Motion
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Yes
BFI Maximum Frequency
120 Hz
BFI Minimum Frequency
60 Hz

The LG C1 48 has a black frame insertion feature to try to reduce motion blur. The photo above is with the OLED Motion Pro setting at 'High', and you can see the photos for the Medium and Low settings. Keep in mind that the BFI scoring is based on the flicker frequency and not the actual performance. It's also different from the TV scoring.

8.7
Motion
Refresh Rate
Native
120 Hz
Max Refresh Rate
120 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
FreeSync
Yes
G-SYNC
Compatible (NVIDIA Certified)
VRR Maximum
120 Hz
VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors HDMI

The LG 48 C1 has a 120Hz panel with native FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility to reduce screen tearing. It even supports HDMI Forum VRR, which we don't test for with monitors. See the TV review for the settings needed to enable VRR.

Inputs
9.3
Inputs
Input Lag
Native Resolution
5.3 ms
Native Resolution @ 60Hz
10.1 ms
Variable Refresh Rate
6.8 ms
Variable Refresh Rate @ 60Hz
14.5 ms
10 Bit HDR
N/A
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
13.8 ms

The LG C1 48 has low input lag as long as it's in the 'Game Optimizer' Picture Mode with the input label set to 'PC'. We also measured the 4k @ 120Hz input lag in the 'Expert (dark space, night)' Picture Mode because this results in a brighter image, but we kept the input label set to 'PC' and the Game Optimizer setting enabled (different from the Picture Mode). We measured 13.7ms with these settings, so you can get a brighter image at the cost of a bit of input lag, which is still good for gaming.

LG has a Prevent Input Delay setting, which is new to their 2021 TVs. It aims to reduce the 60Hz input lag, which explains why it's an improvement from the LG 48 CX OLED. We couldn't measure the 10-bit HDR input lag because we don't have the tools necessary to measure 10-bit input lag over an HDMI 2.1 connection. That said, we don't expect HDR to impact input lag.

Note: The final scoring is different from the TV review because of the different ways we score and test monitors and TVs.

9.0
Inputs
Resolution And Size
Native Resolution 3840 x 2160
Aspect Ratio 16:9
Megapixels 8.3 MP
Pixel Density
92 PPI
Screen Diagonal 48.0"
Screen Area 984 in²

The LG C1 48 has a large screen, and the 4k resolution helps deliver crisp images. However, when using it as a PC monitor, you need to set the input label you're using to 'PC' so you can get proper chroma 4:4:4, which helps with text clarity. You can read about it in our TV review.

Inputs
Inputs
Inputs
Total Inputs
DisplayPort No
Mini DisplayPort No
HDMI 4 (HDMI 2.1)
DVI No
VGA No
DisplayPort Out No
USB 3 (USB 2.0)
USB C No
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm 1
Microphone In 3.5mm No
Digital Optical Audio Out 1
Analog Audio Out RCA No
Power Supply Internal

Unlike most monitors, the LG C1 48 doesn't have a DisplayPort input. HDMI 2 acts as the eARC output, which you can read about in the TV review.

Features
Features
Additional Features
RGB Illumination
No
Speakers
Yes
HDR10 Yes
Multiple Input Display
No

Since the LG C1 48 is a TV, you get a ton more features than most monitors. There's the LG webOS built-in, which has a ton of apps available to download, and the LG Magic Remote offers voice control. There are other image processing features, like upscaling, motion interpolation, judder-free, etc., which you can read about in the TV review.

Features
On-Screen Display (OSD)

See the settings page for the TV here.

Features
Controls
Features
In The Box

  • Remote (with 2x AA batteries)
  • Cable tie
  • User guides

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the LG C1 48 inch (OLED48C1PUB) as a monitor. Although our results in this review should be valid for the other sizes, we tested the 55 inch (OLED55C1PUB) as a TV, and our results for that are more representative of how people will use the larger sizes as a TV and not a monitor.

Size North America Model   EU Model
48" OLED48C1PUB OLED48C14LB
55" OLED55C1PUB OLED55C14LB
65" OLED65C1PUB OLED65C14LB
77" OLED77C1PUB OLED77C14LB
83" OLED83C1PUA OLED83C14LB

If you come across a different type of panel or your LG C1 doesn't correspond to our review, let us know and we'll update the review. Keep in mind that our results between the monitor and TV reviews aren't comparable because of the way that we test each. Some tests, such as gray uniformity, may vary between units.

Our unit was manufactured in May 2021, and you can see the label here.

Compared To Other Monitors

The LG C1 48 delivers fantastic picture quality thanks to its OLED panel, and it has much more features than most monitors. The HDMI 2.1 inputs are also good to have if you want high frame rate 4k gaming, as HDMI 2.1 inputs are only starting to come out with monitors. However, the LG is costly and, considering its risk of burn-in, it may be worth getting a standard monitor instead. If you're going to use the display for PC gaming and streaming content on the side, the burn-in risk shouldn't cause too much of a problem.

See our picks for the best 4k monitors, the best multimedia monitors, the best gaming monitors, and the best TVs to use as a PC monitor.

LG 48 CX OLED

LG 48 C1 OLED is the replacement to the LG 48 CX OLED, and both are very similar in performance. The C1 has lower input lag at 60Hz because of a new 'Prevent Input Delay' setting. The built-in webOS is updated, and it comes with a new Magic Remote. The CX scores higher for SDR peak brightness, but that's because we tested it with a different Picture Mode, and the C1 has about the same brightness in that Picture Mode.

Gigabyte M27Q

The Gigabyte M27Q and the LG 48 C1 OLED are both excellent for gaming, but they're different types of displays. The LG is a 48 inch TV we tested as a monitor, and it uses an OLED panel. This allows it to display a near-infinite contrast ratio with perfect black levels, and it has HDMI 2.1 inputs, allowing you to play 4k games up to 120fps over an HDMI connection. On the other hand, the Gigabyte is a typical monitor with a smaller screen and 1440p resolution, meaning it has better text clarity. It gets significantly brighter, and LED panels don't risk permanent burn-in like OLEDs.

Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T

The Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T and the LG 48 C1 OLED are excellent for gaming, but they have different panel types with pros and cons. The LG's OLED panel has a near-infinite contrast ratio with deep blacks, and it has much wider viewing angles than the Samsung. The LG has a larger screen with a higher 4k resolution, but text looks better on the Samsung because it has higher pixel density. The Samsung has an LED panel that gets brighter and doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in. It also has a higher 240Hz refresh rate which you can achieve over a DisplayPort connection.

Acer Nitro XV282K KVbmiipruzx

The Acer Nitro XV282K KVbmiipruzx and the LG 48 C1 OLED are different types of displays. While the LG is a TV that we tested as a monitor, the Acer is a typical monitor that comes with an ergonomic stand. The LG is larger, but that means the Acer has higher pixel density for clearer text. The LG has an OLED panel with a much higher contrast because it can turn on individual pixels, but the LED panel on the Acer doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in. They each have HDMI 2.1 inputs, but the Acer has a higher 144Hz refresh rate, and it has a DisplayPort connection, which the LG doesn't.

Philips Momentum 436M6VBPAB

The LG 48 C1 OLED is better than the Philips Momentum 436M6VBPAB, but they use different panel types. The LG has an OLED panel with a near-infinite contrast ratio and much wider viewing angles, while the Philips has an LED panel that gets significantly brighter and doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in. The LG is much better for gaming because it has a 120Hz panel with HDMI 2.1 inputs, and it has a much quicker response time and lower input lag. Since the LG is a TV, it also has more features like a built-in webOS, so you can stream content directly from the TV. 

Dell S3221QS

The Dell S3221QS and the LG 48 C1 OLED are different types of 4k displays. The LG is a TV that we tested as a monitor, so it has a ton more features like a built-in OS and processing features. Its OLED panel can turn off individual pixels, resulting in a near-infinite contrast. However, the Dell has an LED panel that gets brighter and doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in like OLEDs. The LG has more gaming features such as HDMI 2.1 inputs and VRR support, and it has a near-instant response time for smooth motion.

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