Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED Monitor Review

Tested using Methodology v1.1
Reviewed Sep 28, 2021 at 10:30 am
Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED Picture
8.5
Mixed Usage
8.3
Office
8.7
Gaming
8.6
Multimedia
8.2
Media Creation
8.7
HDR Gaming
Size 48"
Resolution 3840x2160
Max Refresh Rate
120 Hz
Pixel Type
OLED
Variable Refresh Rate
FreeSync

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED is a 48 inch monitor with an OLED panel. Like all displays with OLED panels, it delivers deep, inky blacks with no blooming around bright objects, and it has wide viewing angles. It's very similar to the LG 48 C1 OLED but with connectivity options that are more in-line with a traditional monitor, with a DisplayPort connection and built-in USB hub, and even a keyboard-video-mouse (KVM) switch. It has a near-instantaneous response time, resulting in crystal-clear motion behind fast-moving objects, as well as low input lag and support for FreeSync and G-SYNC Compatible variable refresh rate. Unfortunately, it's not very bright, and the automatic static brightness limiter (ASBL) causes some issues with desktop use, as the screen dims automatically after a few minutes of relative inactivity. This can be an issue when typing or reading a webpage with a lot of text, as the screen doesn't change enough to trigger the timer. Like all OLEDs, there's also a risk of permanent burn-in, although there are things you can do to reduce the likelihood of this problem.

Our Verdict

8.5 Mixed Usage

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U is an excellent monitor overall. The large, high-resolution screen is superb for multitasking or media creation. It's amazing for gaming in SDR and HDR, thanks to the low input lag and near-instantaneous response time. The nearly-infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity are excellent for watching videos, especially in the dark. It's also great for office use, but it's a bit limited by the lack of ergonomic adjustments, and the screen dims when it's nearly static for a few minutes, which can be an issue when typing.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Superb reflection handling.
  • Superb viewing angles.
  • Inky blacks and perfect black uniformity.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • Fringing around text due to the WBGR subpixel layout.
8.3 Office

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U is a great office monitor. The large, high-resolution screen is superb for multitasking, and it has exceptional gray uniformity. It also has superb reflection handling, so glare shouldn't be an issue, and the image remains accurate at an angle. Unfortunately, there's a possibility of permanent burn-in, and the automatic static brightness limiter decreases the screen brightness considerably when the screen remains nearly static for a few minutes. It also has just okay text clarity, with some fringing around text.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Superb reflection handling.
  • Superb viewing angles.
  • Exceptional gray uniformity.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • Dims considerably when the image is nearly static (ASBL).
  • Fringing around text due to the WBGR subpixel layout.
8.7 Gaming

The Gigabyte FO48U is an amazing gaming monitor. The OLED panel delivers a near-instantaneous response time, resulting in crystal-clear motion with no blur behind fast-moving objects. It also has low input lag, and it supports both FreeSync and G-SYNC Compatible VRR. It has a fast refresh rate, and the large, high-resolution screen delivers an immersive gaming experience. It also has superb reflection handling and fantastic viewing angles, so it's a great choice for co-op gaming, even in a brighter environment.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Fast refresh rate and VRR support.
  • HDMI 2.1 support.
  • Inky blacks and perfect black uniformity.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
8.6 Multimedia

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U is an excellent monitor for watching videos. The large, high-resolution screen and the wide viewing angles are superb for watching videos with friends. It has a nearly infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity, great for watching movies in a dark room. It supports HDR and can display a wide color gamut, but it doesn't support any dynamic HDR formats like Dolby Vision or HDR10+. Unfortunately, it has a fixed stand with no ergonomic adjustments, and it can't get very bright.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Superb reflection handling.
  • Superb viewing angles.
  • Inky blacks and perfect black uniformity.
  • Exceptional gray uniformity.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
8.2 Media Creation

The Gigabyte FO48U is a great monitor for media creators. The large, high-resolution screen makes it easier to see more of your work at once. It has wide viewing angles, so the sides of the screen remain accurate, but the stand is fixed with no ergonomic adjustments. Unfortunately, there's a possibility of permanent burn-in, and the automatic static brightness limiter decreases the screen brightness considerably when the screen remains nearly static for a few minutes.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Superb reflection handling.
  • Superb viewing angles.
  • Exceptional gray uniformity.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • Dims considerably when the image is nearly static (ASBL).
  • Fringing around text due to the WBGR subpixel layout.
8.7 HDR Gaming

The Gigabyte FO48U is an excellent monitor for gaming in HDR. The OLED panel delivers a near-instantaneous response time, resulting in crystal-clear motion with no blur behind fast-moving objects. It also has low input lag, a fast refresh rate, and it supports FreeSync and G-SYNC Compatible VRR. It has a very good color gamut in HDR and nearly infinite contrast with perfect black uniformity, but unfortunately, it has unremarkable peak brightness in HDR.

Pros
  • Large 48 inch screen.
  • Fast refresh rate and VRR support.
  • HDMI 2.1 support.
  • Inky blacks and perfect black uniformity.
  • Very good HDR color gamut.
Cons
  • Risk of burn-in with constant exposure to static elements.
  • Unremarkable peak brightness in HDR.
  • 8.5 Mixed Usage
  • 8.3 Office
  • 8.7 Gaming
  • 8.6 Multimedia
  • 8.2 Media Creation
  • 8.7 HDR Gaming
  1. Updated Sep 28, 2021: Review published.
  2. Updated Sep 23, 2021: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved No
Curve Radius Not Curved
Weight (without stand)
33.1 lbs (15.0 kg)
Weight (with stand)
33.5 lbs (15.2 kg)

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has a simple design, and it looks more like most TVs than a monitor. The simple v-shaped metal feet support the display well, with minimal wobble. The feet are small but wide-set, so you'll need a larger table if you're not planning on VESA mounting it.

Design
Stand
Width
40.0" (101.5 cm)
Depth
9.8" (24.9 cm)

The v-shaped feet support the monitor well, but they're wide-set, so it requires a large table if you're not planning on VESA mounting it. The feet themselves are very small and don't take up much space, so you could still place a soundbar or other objects in front of the display.

0
Design
Ergonomics
Height Adjustment
0.0" (0.0 cm)
Switch Portrait/Landscape No
Swivel Range No swivel
Tilt Range No Tilt

Unfortunately, the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has a fixed stand with no ergonomic adjustments.

Design
Back
Wall Mount VESA 300x300

The back of the Gigabyte FO48U looks a bit like the LG 48 C1 OLED, but with an AORUS logo etched in the back. Unfortunately, there's nothing on the back to help with cable management. The inputs face to the side and are easy to access, which is nice.

Design
Borders
Borders
0.3" (0.9 cm)

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has extremely thin borders that aren't at all distracting.

Design
Thickness
Thickness (with stand)
5.7" (14.6 cm)
Thickness (without stand)
1.7" (4.3 cm)

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U is extremely thin, especially if you're planning on VESA mounting it and remove the feet. It sits nearly flush with the wall if wall-mounted, but there's a small gap at the top portion of the display above the electronics.

9.0
Design
Build Quality

The Gigabyte FO48U has outstanding build quality. It has the same glass panel as the LG OLED TVs, with a metal backing and a plastic housing around the electronics on the back. The metal feet support the monitor well, allowing for very little wobble.

We took a few additional photos to showcase some of the extra details on the monitor:

Picture Quality
10
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
Inf : 1
Contrast With Local Dimming
N/A

The Gigabyte FO48U's OLED panel can turn off individual pixels, resulting in a nearly infinite contrast ratio. This results in deep, inky blacks if you're in a dark room.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

Since OLED panels are self-emissive, the Gigabyte FO48U has no backlight and no local dimming feature. We still film the local dimming video on the monitor, so you can see how it compares to other monitors with a local dimming feature and traditional LED backlight.

6.3
Picture Quality
SDR Peak Brightness
SDR Real Scene
201 cd/m²
SDR Peak 2% Window
347 cd/m²
SDR Peak 10% Window
351 cd/m²
SDR Peak 25% Window
353 cd/m²
SDR Peak 50% Window
200 cd/m²
SDR Peak 100% Window
109 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 2% Window
329 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 10% Window
335 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 25% Window
336 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 50% Window
191 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 100% Window
106 cd/m²
SDR ABL
0.081

Unfortunately, the Gigabyte FO48U has mediocre peak brightness in SDR. Small highlights are significantly brighter than the LG 48 C1 OLED, but in real scenes they're about the same. Unfortunately, although small highlights in dark scenes are very bright, the peak brightness decreases with larger bright areas on-screen. It can sustain bright highlights well, but there's a slight decrease in peak brightness over time.

It also dims the screen after a few minutes of relative inactivity, which is a burn-in prevention measure known as Automatic Static Brightness Limiter, or ASBL. On the AORUS FO48U the activity threshold appears to be quite high, and even if you're just composing an email or reading a webpage for a few minutes the screen dims considerably. Decreasing the contrast or brightness can trick the TV and stop this from happening, but unlike the LG OLED TVs, there doesn't appear to be any way to fully disable this.

We measured the SDR peak brightness after calibration in the 'Custom 1' Picture Mode with Brightness set to 100. If you want a brighter image and don't care as much about accuracy, the 'Vivid' mode produces brighter highlights, but real scenes are about the same brightness as our calibrated settings.

Vivid Mode:
Real Scene: 202 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window: 624 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window: 520 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window: 371 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window: 206 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window: 112 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window: 589 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window: 495 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window: 353 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window: 196 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window: 109 cd/m²

6.4
Picture Quality
HDR Peak Brightness
HDR Real Scene
399 cd/m²
HDR Peak 2% Window
611 cd/m²
HDR Peak 10% Window
520 cd/m²
HDR Peak 25% Window
377 cd/m²
HDR Peak 50% Window
209 cd/m²
HDR Peak 100% Window
114 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 2% Window
578 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 10% Window
496 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 25% Window
360 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 50% Window
200 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 100% Window
110 cd/m²
HDR ABL
0.104

Unfortunately, the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has unremarkable peak brightness in HDR, and it's significantly dimmer in real scenes than the LG 48 C1 OLED. It's not bright enough for most HDR movies, but still delivers an impactful experience when gaming in HDR. Small highlights can get really bright, but fade a bit when held over time. This shouldn't be too noticeable with most real content. It tracks the EOTF well, but near-black scenes are over brightened a bit. Unfortunately, the EOTF cuts off sharply at the monitor's peak brightness, causing a loss of fine details in bright scenes.

We measured the HDR peak brightness in the 'HDR' Picture Mode and Brightness set to '100'. If you prefer brightness over image accuracy, the 'Vivid' mode delivers significantly brighter highlights, but the real scene peak brightness is much lower, and it doesn't track the EOTF accurately, as almost all scenes are way too bright, and it rolls off sharply at its peak brightness, resulting in a loss of fine details in bright scenes.

HDR Vivid Mode:
Real Scene: 300 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window: 856 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window: 702 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window: 441 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window: 242 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window: 132 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window: 798 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window: 665 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window: 418 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window: 231 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window: 127 cd/m²

9.1
Picture Quality
Horizontal Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Left
49°
Color Washout From Right
55°
Color Shift From Left
41°
Color Shift From Right
40°
Brightness Loss From Left
68°
Brightness Loss From Right
70°
Black Level Raise From Left
70°
Black Level Raise From Right
70°
Gamma Shift From Left
70°
Gamma Shift From Right
69°

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has a superb horizontal viewing angle. Colors wash out a bit at a wide angle, but it's not noticeable under most normal viewing conditions.

9.2
Picture Quality
Vertical Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Below
59°
Color Washout From Above
57°
Color Shift From Below
37°
Color Shift From Above
36°
Brightness Loss From Below
70°
Brightness Loss From Above
70°
Black Level Raise From Below
70°
Black Level Raise From Above
70°
Gamma Shift From Below
70°
Gamma Shift From Above
70°

The Gigabyte FO48U has a fantastic vertical viewing angle. Colors shift at a slightly narrower angle than they do horizontally, but again, this isn't noticeable under most normal viewing conditions.

9.0
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
1.557%
50% DSE
0.085%
5% Std. Dev.
0.659%
5% DSE
0.087%

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has exceptional gray uniformity. There's almost no dirty screen effect in the center, but the sides are slightly darker. Like all OLEDs, there are some faint vertical lines when displaying large uniform colors and in near-dark scenes, but they're really hard to see. Uniformity can vary between individual units, but it's rarely an issue with recent monitors, and it's rarely an issue with OLED panels.

10
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
0.157%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

Thanks to the OLED panel, the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has perfect black uniformity. There's no blooming around bright objects and no cloudiness. With LED monitors, this can vary between units, but all OLEDs have perfect black uniformity.

7.2
Picture Quality
Pre Calibration
Picture Mode
sRGB
Luminance
287 cd/m²
Luminance Settings
100
Contrast Setting
N/A
RGB Controls
Default
Gamma Setting
Default
Color Temperature
6,222 K
White Balance dE
3.77
Color dE
2.59
Gamma
2.21

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U we bought has decent accuracy out of the box, but this can vary between units. There are some noticeable issues with brighter shades of gray, but most colors are displayed accurately. Unfortunately, even in the 'sRGB' Picture Mode, gamma doesn't track the sRGB gamma curve at all, as darker scenes are too dark, and bright scenes are significantly over brightened. The color temperature is also a bit warm, giving everything a slightly reddish tint.

9.4
Picture Quality
Post Calibration
Picture Mode
Custom 1
Luminance
100 cd/m²
Luminance Settings
28
Contrast Setting
50
RGB Controls
100-92-79
Gamma Setting
2.2
Color Temperature
6,492 K
White Balance dE
0.70
Color dE
1.07
Gamma
2.19

After calibration, the Gigabyte FO48U has much better accuracy. Gamma follows the sRGB target curve almost perfectly, and the color temperature is almost perfect. The white balance and colors still have some inaccuracies, but other than a minor inaccuracy with pure cyan, it's not really noticeable.

You can download our ICC profile calibration here. This is provided for reference and shouldn't be used, as the calibration values vary per individual unit even for the same model due to manufacturing tolerances.

9.4
Picture Quality
SDR Color Gamut
sRGB xy
100.0%
Adobe RGB xy
88.8%
sRGB Picture Mode
Custom 1
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Custom 1

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has an incredible SDR color gamut. It can display the entire sRGB color space used by most current desktop content and games. Coverage of the wider Adobe RGB color space is also excellent, but it can't display the full range of greens or cyans. It's still a great choice for professional content creators.

9.8
Picture Quality
SDR Color Volume
sRGB In ICtCp
100.0%
Adobe RGB In ICtCp
95.0%
sRGB Picture Mode
Custom 1
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Custom 1

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has outstanding SDR color volume. Thanks to the near-infinite contrast ratio, it can display dark saturated colors well, and bright colors are nearly as bright as pure white.

7.9
Picture Quality
HDR Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI P3 xy
88.7%
Rec. 2020 xy
70.2%
DCI P3 Picture Mode
HDR Mode
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
HDR Mode

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has a very good HDR color gamut. It has excellent coverage of the DCI P3 color space used by most current HDR content. Coverage of the wider Rec. 2020 color space is decent, and it can display a wide color gamut.

We also took measurements of the HDR color gamut in the 'HDR Vivid' Picture Mode with a 50% stimulus, and we checked the tone mapping with CalMAN and a 75% stimulus:

DCI P3 Color Gamut
DCI P3 tone mapping
Rec. 2020 Color Gamut
Rec. 2020 tone mapping

Coverage of Rec. 2020 is about the same in 'HDR Vivid', but coverage of DCI P3 is much better, mainly due to a difference in tone mapping. The bad coverage of higher stimulus levels in 'HDR Vivid' reduces the color volume for both Rec. 2020 and DCI P3. Unfortunately, the tone mapping is terrible in this mode, so we really don't recommend it unless you only care about peak brightness.

7.3
Picture Quality
HDR Color Volume
DCI-P3 In ICtCp
83.5%
Rec. 2020 In ICtCp
62.2%
DCI P3 Picture Mode
HDR Mode
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
HDR Mode

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has decent HDR color volume. Thanks to the OLED panel and nearly infinite contrast, it can display dark colors well, but bright colors in HDR aren't as bright as pure white.

We also took measurements of the HDR color volume in the 'HDR Vivid' Picture Mode:

DCI P3:
IPT Picture
Normalized volume: 78.8%
Rec. 2020:
IPT Picture
Normalized volume: 59.2%

Unfortunately, the terrible tone mapping in 'HDR Vivid' results in noticeably worse color volume.

9.9
Picture Quality
Image Retention
IR After 0 Min Recovery
0.04%
IR After 2 Min Recovery
0.01%
IR After 4 Min Recovery
0.00%
IR After 6 Min Recovery
0.04%
IR After 8 Min Recovery
0.00%
IR After 10 Min Recovery
0.01%

There's no visible temporary image retention on our unit of the Gigabyte FO48U. Like all OLED displays, there are some fine vertical lines when displaying a uniform color. Our image retention algorithm is detecting these fine lines and thinks they are remnants of our high-contrast static test image.

9.1
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit

The Gigabyte FO48U has fantastic gradient handling. There's very little banding in areas of similar color. Unlike the LG 48 C1 OLED, there are no options to smooth gradients and reduce banding.

10
Picture Quality
Color Bleed
Pixel Row Error
0.001%
Pixel Column Error
0.003%

There are no noticeable signs of color bleed on our unit of the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U. Although this can vary between individual units, it's rarely a noticeable issue.

9.2
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Glossy
Total Reflections
1.3%
Indirect Reflections
0.1%
Calculated Direct Reflections
1.2%

The Gigabyte FO48U has superb reflection handling. The glossy finish reduces the intensity of direct reflections without spreading the glare around a larger area of the screen. Even glare from bright sources shouldn't be very distracting.

6.5
Picture Quality
Text Clarity
Sub-Pixel Layout
WBGR

Unfortunately, due to the WBGR subpixel structure the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has just okay text clarity. Despite the similarities and nearly identical panel to the LG 48 C1 OLED, the FO48U actually has slightly worse text clarity, as the color fringing on the outsides of text is noticeably worse on this monitor.

Windows recommends a scaling factor of 150% for the AORUS FO48U, but this results in rather large UI elements. The photos in the review were taken at 100% scaling (no scaling), but we took a few additional photos to show you the difference between 100%, 125%, and 150%:

Like most OLED panels, this monitor uses four sub-pixels, but all four are never used at the same time. This image shows the red, white, and blue sub-pixels, but we also took photos of a few different colors to show how it displays them at a subpixel level:

Motion
9.9
Motion
Response Time @ Max Refresh Rate
Best Overdrive Setting
No Overdrive
Rise / Fall Time
≈ 0.8 ms
Total Response Time
≈ 2.1 ms
Overshoot Error
≈ 0.9%
Dark Rise / Fall Time
≈ 0.8 ms
Dark Total Response Time
≈ 3.6 ms
Dark Overshoot Error
≈ 3.2%

Overdrive Setting Response Time Chart Response Time Tables Motion Blur Photo
No Overdrive Chart Table Photo

Like all OLED displays, the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has a near-instantaneous response time at the max refresh rate, resulting in crystal-clear motion with no noticeable blur behind fast-moving objects. As it's already essentially perfect, the overdrive can't be adjusted.

Note: When we measured the response times of the FO48U, we encountered some strange results. If you look at our unscaled response time tables, you can see that the initial transition is near-instantaneous, but it appears to overshoot the target a bit, and then very slowly stabilize down. We think that this is actually due to the ABL of the monitor, and not part of the actual transitions. With real content, this monitor looks nearly identical to the LG 48 C1 OLED and the LG 48 CX OLED.

We took an additional photo with a different test pattern, with BFI enabled, to make it easier to see what's going on with a 0-100% transition. If you look closely to the left of each black bar, you can see a very thin white bar that isn't the same shade as the rest of the screen, which is on a white background. We suspect that the display's ABL feature is dimming the white bar to match the rest of the screen.

Given that this issue is only noticeable with very specific test patterns, we took the exceptional decision to use the values from the LG 48 C1 OLED, as our measured results don't accurately reflect the real-world user experience. The C1 uses a very similar, if not identical panel, and visually, the two perform the same. The tables and graphs shown here are the actual values measured on the FO48U, following our normal methodology, including waiting for each transition to get within 2% of the final value.

9.9
Motion
Response Time @ 60Hz
Best Overdrive Setting
No Overdrive
Rise / Fall Time
≈ 0.8 ms
Total Response Time
≈ 3.4 ms
Overshoot Error
≈ 0.9%
Dark Rise / Fall Time
≈ 0.8 ms
Dark Total Response Time
≈ 6.7 ms
Dark Overshoot Error
≈ 3.1%

Overdrive Setting Response Time Chart Response Time Tables Motion Blur Photo
No Overdrive Chart Table Photo

Like all OLED displays, the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has a near-instantaneous response time at 60Hz, resulting in crystal-clear motion with no noticeable blur behind fast-moving objects, but more persistence blur due to the slower refresh rate. As it's already essentially perfect, the overdrive can't be adjusted.

Note: When we measured the response times of this monitor, we encountered some strange results. If you look at our unscaled response time tables, you can see that the initial transition is near-instantaneous, but it appears to overshoot the target a bit, and then very slowly stabilize down. We think that this is actually due to the ABL of the monitor, and not part of the actual transitions. With real content, this monitor looks nearly identical to the LG 48 C1 OLED and the LG 48 CX OLED.

We took an additional photo with a different test pattern, with BFI enabled, to make it easier to see what's going on with a 0-100% transition. If you look closely to the left of each black bar, you can see a very thin white bar that isn't the same shade as the rest of the screen, which is on a white background. We suspect that the display's ABL feature is dimming the white bar to match the rest of the screen.

Given that this issue is only noticeable with very specific test patterns, we took the exceptional decision to use the values from the LG 48 C1 OLED, as our measured results don't accurately reflect the real-world user experience. The C1 uses a very similar, if not identical panel, and visually, the two perform the same. The tables and graphs shown here are the actual values measured on the FO48U, following our normal methodology, including waiting for each transition to get within 2% of the final value.

10
Motion
Image Flicker
Flicker-Free No
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The Gigabyte FO48U is nearly flicker-free, but like all OLEDs, there's a slight dip that coincides with the display's 120Hz refresh rate. This isn't at all noticeable.

5.9
Motion
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Yes
BFI Maximum Frequency
120 Hz
BFI Minimum Frequency
120 Hz

The Gigabyte FO48U has an optional black frame insertion feature to improve the appearance of motion. Unfortunately, unlike the LG 48 C1 OLED, it's only available when the refresh rate is set to 120Hz, so it can't improve the appearance of 60Hz content. Like most monitors, it also can't be enabled if Adaptive Sync is enabled on the monitor, even if it's disabled on the source. Note that our scoring is based only on the refresh rates that support BFI, not on how well the feature works.

8.7
Motion
Refresh Rate
Native
120 Hz
Max Refresh Rate
120 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
FreeSync
Yes
G-SYNC
Compatible (Tested)
VRR Maximum
120 Hz
VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors DisplayPort, HDMI

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has a very fast refresh rate, and it supports FreeSync variable refresh rate technology. We also tested it with NVIDIA's G-SYNC Compatible mode and found that although it's not certified, it works properly with G-SYNC, but only over HDMI. When we tested it with G-SYNC over DisplayPort, the screen turns black any time we launched a game that uses VRR. It has the same wide refresh rate range with any supported source, including support for low framerate compensation (LFC).

Inputs
9.3
Inputs
Input Lag
Native Resolution
4.8 ms
Native Resolution @ 60Hz
13.1 ms
Variable Refresh Rate
5.4 ms
Variable Refresh Rate @ 60Hz
13.4 ms
10 Bit HDR
N/A
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
12.9 ms

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has fantastic low input lag, as long as the Adaptive Sync setting is enabled. Strangely, disabling this setting causes the input lag to increase to 12.8ms at the native resolution and maximum refresh rate. Enabling this setting reduces input lag considerably, even if VRR is disabled on the source device. At 60Hz, the input lag increases to 21.0ms with this setting disabled. Since the black frame insertion (BFI) feature can't be enabled if Adaptive Sync is on, the input lag with BFI is higher.

Refresh RateAdaptive Sync OnAdaptive Sync Off
60Hz13.1ms21.0ms
120Hz4.8ms12.8ms
BFI @ 120HzN/A12.9ms

Unfortunately, we can't test the HDR input lag at the maximum refresh rate, as we can only test HDR over HDMI, and the maximum refresh rate of the AORUS FO48U over HDMI requires an HDMI 2.1 port. Our test equipment is limited to HDMI 2.0, so we can't test HDMI 2.1 input lag at the moment. We don't expect HDR to make any difference to the input lag.

9.0
Inputs
Resolution And Size
Native Resolution 3840 x 2160
Aspect Ratio 16:9
Megapixels 8.3 MP
Pixel Density
92 PPI
Screen Diagonal 48.0"
Screen Area 984 in²

The large, high-resolution screen of the Gigabyte FO48U is great for multitasking and delivers a more immersive gaming experience, depending on how close you're sitting.

Inputs
Inputs
Inputs
Total Inputs
DisplayPort 1 (DP 1.4)
Mini DisplayPort No
HDMI 2 (HDMI 2.1)
DVI No
VGA No
DisplayPort Out No
USB 2 (USB 3.0)
USB C 1 (USB, USB PD, DP Alt Mode)
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm 2
Microphone In 3.5mm No
Digital Optical Audio Out No
Analog Audio Out RCA No
Power Supply Internal

The total inputs are arguably one of the biggest differences between this monitor and the LG 48 C1 OLED, as the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U has a DisplayPort connection and it has a built-in USB hub. Like the C1, it also has HDMI 2.1 support but only two HDMI ports. It also has a USB-C port that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode and USB-C Power Delivery, but it's advertised to only deliver 15W of power, which isn't enough to charge a laptop while using it.

Features
Features
Additional Features
RGB Illumination
No
Speakers
Yes
HDR10 Yes
Multiple Input Display
PIP + PBP

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U comes with a few extra features, including:

  • Virtual Crosshair: There are four virtual crosshairs to choose from. Unlike software virtual crosshairs, these can't be detected by your games.
  • FPS Counter: Displays the current number of frames per second received from the source.
  • Black Equalizer: Adjusts gamma to make it easier to spot other players/enemies in shadows.
  • KVM: Like Gigabyte's M Series monitors, the FO48U also features a built-in keyboard, video, and mouse switch, but there's no dedicated button at the back. This feature allows you to switch between two sources and work on both with a single keyboard, mouse, and monitor. For it to work, one of the two displays must be connected over USB-C, and the other has to have the USB upstream cable connected.
  • Dashboard: This feature allows you to display vital statistics from your computer, including CPU and GPU temps, fan speeds, memory usage, etc..., directly on the monitor as an overlay.
  • Space Audio: There are different EQ modes for the built-in speakers, including 'FPS', 'Movie', and 'Live Concert'.

Features
On-Screen Display (OSD)

The Gigabyte FO48U has the same on-screen display as the other Gigabyte monitors we've tested recently.

Features
Controls

You can control the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U's OSD using the joystick button at the back of the monitor, similar to most LG monitors. It also comes with a very basic remote that you can use to navigate the menus, change inputs, or power on/off the display.

Features
In The Box

  • 3 different power cables
  • Remote (closeup)
  • 2x AAA batteries
  • DisplayPort cable
  • HDMI cable
  • USB-B upstream cable
  • User manuals

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 48 inch Gigabyte AORUS FO48U monitor, which is part of Gigabyte's AORUS gaming lineup. There are many other monitors in the AORUS lineup with various configurations, some of which you can see in the table below. As they each have different specs, we don't expect our review to be valid for any of the other models.

Model Size Panel Type Resolution Max Refresh Rate
FO48U 48" OLED 3840 x 2160 120Hz
FI27Q-X 27" IPS 2560 x 1440 240Hz
FI32U 32" IPS 3840 x 2160 144Hz

If someone comes across a different type of panel or their Gigabyte FO48U doesn't correspond to our review, let us know and we'll update the review. Note that some tests, like gray uniformity, may vary between individual units.

Our unit was manufactured in April 2021; you can see the label here.

Compared To Other Monitors

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U is an amazing gaming monitor that delivers exceptional picture quality and a responsive gaming experience. The OLED panel delivers inky blacks with perfect black uniformity, but there are some distracting issues with dimming, and there's a possibility of permanent burn-in. There aren't many OLED monitors available, but we've also tested two LG TVs as monitors, the LG 48 C1 OLED and the LG 48 CX OLED, and both of them are better choices overall than the Gigabyte.

For more options, check out our recommendations for the best gaming monitors, the best 4k HDR monitors, and the best 34 Inch + monitors.

LG 48 C1 OLED

The LG 48 C1 OLED is slightly better than the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED. Both of them use very similar, if not identical panels but the LG is brighter in HDR, and it has a more versatile black frame insertion feature. The LG also has a built-in smart interface and more advanced image processing options. The Gigabyte has better connectivity, though, as it has a DisplayPort connection and a built-in USB hub with a keyboard, video, and mouse switch.

Gigabyte M27Q

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED and the Gigabyte M27Q are both excellent gaming monitors, but they're very different, and the best one depends on your needs and usage. The FO48U is a very large monitor with an OLED screen, which delivers perfect blacks, wide viewing angles, and a nearly instantaneous response time. Unfortunately, the FO48U has a chance of permanent burn-in, which can be an issue when used as a desktop monitor. If you want a standard desktop monitor with no risk of burn-in, the M27Q is a safer choice.

LG 48 CX OLED

The LG 48 CX OLED is slightly better than the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED. They have deliver nearly identical performance, but the LG is a bit brighter in HDR. The Gigabyte has slightly better viewing angles and a wider SDR color gamut, but this could be unit variance. The LG has a built-in smart interface and more advanced image processing options. The Gigabyte has better connectivity, though, as it has a DisplayPort connection and a built-in USB hub with a keyboard, video, and mouse switch.

Samsung Odyssey Neo G9

The Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 and the Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED use different panel technologies, each with strengths and weaknesses. The Samsung has an ultrawide VA panel, and it's significantly brighter than the Gigabyte. The Gigabyte, on the other hand, has an OLED panel, which delivers much deeper, inky blacks with perfect uniformity and no blooming around bright objects. Unfortunately, this OLED panel also comes with a risk of permanent burn-in.

Gigabyte G27Q

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED and the Gigabyte G27Q use very different panel technologies, each with strengths and weaknesses. The FO48U uses an OLED panel, which has a nearly-instantaneous response time and can display deep, inky blacks with perfect uniformity. Unfortunately, the FO48U also has a risk of permanent burn-in. The G27Q uses an IPS panel, which has no risk of burn-in, but it's brighter in HDR, especially with very bright scenes.

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