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MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED Monitor Review

Tested using Methodology v1.2
Reviewed Jul 12, 2023 at 09:42 am
Latest change: Writing modified Jul 12, 2023 at 09:42 am
MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED Picture
8.8
Mixed Usage
8.0
Office
9.1
Gaming
9.2
Media Consumption
8.8
Media Creation
9.2
HDR

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED is a 34-inch ultrawide gaming monitor with a QD-OLED panel. It's designed as a gaming monitor as it has a 175Hz refresh rate, variable refresh rate (VRR) support, and HDMI 2.1 bandwidth that lets it take full advantage of gaming consoles and high-end graphics cards. It even has a strip of RGB lighting on the bottom bezel to match your other RGB peripherals. On top of its gaming features, it also has extra perks designed for everyday use, like a USB-C port that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode and 65W of power delivery, a KVM switch, and Picture-by-Picture and Picture-in-Picture modes. As it's an OLED display, it's prone to permanent burn-in when exposed to the same static elements over time. It includes some settings to mitigate the risk of burn-in, like a pixel refresh cycle with a pop-up message on the screen every four hours to run it.

Our Verdict

8.8 Mixed Usage

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED is excellent for most uses. It's fantastic for gaming as it has a near-instantaneous response time, low input lag, and VRR support. The incredible picture quality is also beneficial for watching content, whether in SDR or HDR, as it displays deep and inky blacks and a wide range of colors. Its 34-inch, 3440x1440 resolution provides plenty of space for multitasking, like if you need it for work or content creation. Still, it has some text clarity issues and the risk of permanent burn-in when exposed to the same static elements over time.

Pros
  • Ultrawide 34-inch screen.
  • Smooth motion handling.
  • Perfect black levels without any blooming.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Displays wide range of vivid colors.
Cons
  • Text clarity issues.
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • Low SDR peak brightness.
  • Color fringing around windows.
8.0 Office

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED is good for office use, but there are some limitations. Its ultrawide screen provides plenty of screen space to multitask, and it has fantastic reflection handling, which is useful if you want to use it in a well-lit room. However, it has text clarity issues due to its subpixel layout, and there's color fringing around windows. It also risks permanent burn-in when exposed to the same static elements over time, which can be problematic with taskbars and icons on the screen all day.

Pros
  • Ultrawide 34-inch screen.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Extra productivity features, like a KVM switch.
  • Wide viewing angles.
Cons
  • Text clarity issues.
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • Color fringing around windows.
9.1 Gaming

The MSI MEG 342C is fantastic for gaming. It has a 175Hz refresh rate with VRR support, and motion looks incredibly smooth thanks to its near-instantaneous response times. Your inputs also feel responsive as it has low input lag. While it performs best for PC gaming, it also supports 4k @ 120Hz gaming from consoles, but you'll see black bars on the sides due to its ultrawide format. Lastly, it's incredible for gaming in dark rooms because of its near-infinite contrast ratio, so blacks look deep and inky.

Pros
  • Smooth motion handling.
  • Perfect black levels without any blooming.
  • FreeSync VRR and G-SYNC compatibility.
  • HDMI 2.1 bandwidth for console gaming.
Cons
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • Low SDR peak brightness.
9.2 Media Consumption

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED is remarkable for media consumption. The ultrawide screen is ideal if you like watching movies in an ultrawide format, as they fill up the entire screen. The picture quality is incredible thanks to its near-infinite contrast ratio that makes black deep and inky, and it also displays a wide range of colors and makes them look vivid. It has wide viewing angles, which is ideal if you want to watch something with a friend sitting next to you, as they'll see a consistent image from the sides.

Pros
  • Ultrawide 34-inch screen.
  • Perfect black levels without any blooming.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Displays wide range of vivid colors.
Cons
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • Low SDR peak brightness.
8.8 Media Creation

The MSI MEG 342C is excellent for media creation. It displays a wide range of colors, and has impressive accuracy before calibration. Its ultrawide screen allows you to view more of your work area at once, and its wide viewing angles are great if you constantly need to share the screen with someone next to you. However, its curved display isn't ideal if you need to view straight lines, and it has color fringing and text clarity issues. Another major downside is that it runs the risk of permanent burn-in when exposed to the same static elements over time, like if your editing programs are open all the time.

Pros
  • Ultrawide 34-inch screen.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Impressive accuracy before calibration.
Cons
  • Text clarity issues.
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • Low SDR peak brightness.
  • Color fringing around windows.
9.2 HDR

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED is incredible for HDR. Thanks to its OLED panel, it displays deep and inky blacks, and there isn't any blooming around bright objects either. It also displays a wide range of colors and makes them look vivid due to its incredible color volume. The HDR brightness is also decent enough to make small highlights stand out against the rest of the image, but the overall screen brightness in HDR can be a bit limited, and it doesn't track the PQ EOTF well.

Pros
  • Perfect black levels without any blooming.
  • Displays wide range of vivid colors.
  • Small highlights pop.
  • Fantastic gradient handling.
Cons
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • PQ EOTF tracking is too bright.
  • 8.8 Mixed Usage
  • 8.0 Office
  • 9.1 Gaming
  • 9.2 Media Consumption
  • 8.8 Media Creation
  • 9.2 HDR
  1. Updated Jul 12, 2023: Review published.
  2. Updated Jul 07, 2023: Early access published.
  3. Updated Jun 28, 2023: Our testers have started testing this product.
  4. Updated Jun 14, 2023: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  5. Updated Jun 13, 2023: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

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34" MEG 342C QD-OLED
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Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 34-inch MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED, which is the only size available for this monitor.

Model Size Curvature Panel Type Resolution Max Refresh Rate
342C 34" 1800R QD-OLED 3440x1440 175Hz

Our unit was manufactured in Feb 2023; you can see the label here.

Compared To Other Monitors

The MSI MEG 342C is an excellent ultrawide gaming monitor that combines fantastic gaming performance with incredible picture quality. It's better than most gaming monitors, and its performance is very similar to its main competitors, the Dell Alienware AW3423DW, the Dell Alienware AW3423DWF, and the Samsung Odyssey OLED G8/G85SB S34BG85. It has worse PQ EOTF tracking than the other QD-OLED monitors, so if you care about the best HDR performance, it might not be worth getting this monitor. However, it has features the others don't have, like a useful KVM switch if you need to connect multiple sources. Its HDMI 2.1 bandwidth is also ideal for any type of gamer, including console gamers, and even if consoles don't support ultrawide gaming, it's at least versatile if you want something for your PC and console. It's a fantastic choice, especially if you can find it for cheaper than other QD-OLED monitors.

See our recommendations for the best ultrawide gaming monitors, the best gaming monitors, and the best 34-49-inch monitors.

Dell Alienware AW3423DWF

The Dell Alienware AW3423DWF and the MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED both use the same QD-OLED panel and have many similarities, but some differences exist. The Dell has better PQ EOTF tracking, so the image looks more accurate on the Dell. However, the MSI has a few advantages in other areas, like its HDMI 2.1 bandwidth that lets it take full advantage of gaming consoles and its extra productivity features like a KVM switch and Picture-in-Picture and Picture-by-Picture modes.

Samsung Odyssey OLED G8/G85SB S34BG85

The Samsung Odyssey OLED G8/G85SB S34BG85 and the MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED are similar monitors that use the same QD-OLED panel. There still are a few differences, though, as the Samsung gets brighter in SDR but also has a slightly more aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter. The Samsung monitor also has a built-in smart system, making it easier to stream content without needing a PC. While they both support HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, the MSI works with 4k @ 120Hz signals from the Xbox Series X|S and PS5, which the Samsung model can't do. They each have USB-C ports, but the MSI has a few extra features, like a KVM switch and Picture-by-Picture and Picture-in-Picture modes.

Dell Alienware AW3423DW

The Dell Alienware AW3423DW and the MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED are similar monitors that use the same QD-OLED panel. While they mainly perform the same, there are a few differences. The Dell has better PQ EOTF tracking in HDR and improved color accuracy. While the Dell monitor has native G-SYNC VRR support, the MSI still has G-SYNC compatibility and works with NVIDIA graphics cards. The MSI has a few advantages regarding features, as it has HDMI 2.1 bandwidth and can take full advantage of the PS5 and Xbox Series X|S, which is something the Dell model can't do. The MSI also has a USB-C port and a KVM switch, making it the better choice if you need something for multitasking.

Corsair XENEON FLEX 45WQHD240

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED and the Corsair XENEON FLEX 45WQHD240 are both fantastic OLED gaming monitors with a few differences. The MSI has a smaller screen, but because they have the same resolution, the Corsair has lower pixel density and worse image sharpness. The MSI also has a QD-OLED panel that gets brighter and delivers more vivid colors than the Corsair for an improved HDR experience. While they each have USB-C ports, the MSI delivers higher power delivery, making it easier to charge power-hungry devices. On the other hand, the Corsair has a higher 240Hz refresh rate and a bendable screen that lets you adjust its curve to your liking.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved
Yes
Curve Radius
1800R

The MSI 342C has a gamer-oriented aesthetic with a black plastic body and gold accents. It features down-facing RGB lighting on the bottom bezel, which you can see here. It even includes a mouse bungee, and you can place it on either side of the monitor, which you can see here.

8.5
Design
Build Quality

The build quality is excellent. It feels solid, and the plastic body doesn't flex. Rubber feet on the stand prevent it from sliding easily, but the screen still wobbles, so you need a stable desk to place it on. One small annoyance is that the power cable measures 59" (1.5 m) and may be too small if your power source is far from the monitor.

6.0
Design
Ergonomics
Height Adjustment
3.9" (10.0 cm)
Tilt Range
-20° to 5°
Rotate Portrait/Landscape
No
Swivel Range
No swivel
Wall Mount
VESA 100x100

The ergonomics are decent for an ultrawide monitor, but without swivel range, it can be difficult to turn the screen to show to a friend. The back features matte plastic with vents on top, and cable management is serviced through the stand.

Design
Stand
Base Width
21.8" (55.4 cm)
Base Depth
11.9" (30.1 cm)
Thickness (With Display)
11.2" (28.5 cm)
Weight (With Display)
20.0 lbs (9.1 kg)

The MSI 342C has a V-shaped stand that takes up a lot of space, and you can see what it looks like from the back here. The thickness is measured from the sides to the back of the stand, and the thickness from the center of the screen to the back of the stand is 8.9" (22.5 cm).

Design
Display
Size
34"
Housing Width
32.3" (82.0 cm)
Housing Height
14.7" (37.4 cm)
Thickness (Without Stand)
5.5" (14.0 cm)
Weight (Without Stand)
13.9 lbs (6.3 kg)
Borders Size (Bezels)
0.3" (0.9 cm)

The thickness is measured from the sides to the back of the screen, and the thickness from the center of the screen is 3.3" (8.4 cm).

Design
Controls

The controls consist of a power button, a button to open Gaming Intelligence if you have it installed (or you can use it as a hotkey), and a joystick to control the on-screen menu.

Design
In The Box
Power Supply
Internal

  • DisplayPort cable
  • HDMI cable
  • USB-C cable
  • USB-B to USB-A cable
  • Audio splitter
  • Power cable
  • VESA wall-mount adapter screws
  • Mouse bungee
  • User guides, including calibration report

Picture Quality
10
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
Inf : 1
Contrast With Local Dimming
N/A

The MSI 342C has a near-infinite contrast ratio with perfect black levels thanks to its OLED panel. This means it can display deep blacks next to bright highlights when viewed in dark rooms. However, it's important to remember that ambient light causes the black levels to raise, so blacks look closer to purple in bright rooms.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

The MSI MEG 342C doesn't have a backlight, so it doesn't require a local dimming feature. However, with a near-infinite contrast ratio, there isn't any blooming around bright objects, and it's the equivalent of a perfect local dimming feature. We still film these videos on the monitor so you can see how the screen performs and compare it with a monitor that has local dimming.

6.5
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene
218 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
239 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
236 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
237 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
238 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
238 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
237 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
235 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
236 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
237 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
236 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.001
Minimum Brightness
26 cd/m²

The SDR brightness is okay. It gets bright enough to fight glare in rooms with a few lights around, and while it isn't enough if you have direct sunlight in your room, it's best to avoid placing OLEDs in direct sunlight as it can damage the panel. Luckily, its brightness is very consistent across different scenes, and there isn't an aggressively distracting Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).

The results are from after calibration with the following settings:

  • Game Mode: User
  • Brightness: 100
  • Auto Brightness Control: Off
  • Pixel Shift: Slow
  • Static Screen Detection: Off

6.5
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
VESA DisplayHDR Certification
DisplayHDR TRUE BLACK 400
Real Scene
343 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
966 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
446 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
354 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
297 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
248 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
960 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
443 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
352 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
296 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
247 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.078

The MSI 342C has okay HDR brightness. While it doesn't get as bright with real content as the Samsung Odyssey OLED G8/G85SB S34BG85 or the Dell Alienware AW3423DW, it still gets very bright with small highlights, and they pop against the rest of the image. The EOTF doesn't follow the target well either, as dark scenes are too dark, and other scenes are too bright. There's a sharp cut-off at the peak brightness, meaning it gets the brightest it can before your PC does any tone mapping.

These results are in the 'Peak 1000 nits' DisplayHDR mode, which lets it get bright, but it has an aggressive ABL. This can be noticeable when you're on the desktop, as you'll see some changes in brightness when opening and closing windows. If that bothers you, you can also use the 'True Black 400' DisplayHDR mode, for which you can see the results below. It doesn't get as bright, but the EOTF is also much better, following the target almost perfectly.

  • Real Scene 346 cd/m²
  • Peak 2% Window 436 cd/m²
  • Peak 10% Window 444 cd/m²
  • Peak 25% Window 362 cd/m²
  • Peak 50% Window 309 cd/m²
  • Peak 100% Window 262 cd/m²
  • Sustained 2% Window 433 cd/m²
  • Sustained 10% Window 440 cd/m²
  • Sustained 25% Window 360 cd/m²
  • Sustained 50% Window 307 cd/m²
  • Sustained 100% Window 260 cd/m²
  • ABL 0.034
  • EOTF

10
Picture Quality
Horizontal Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Left
70°
Color Washout From Right
70°
Color Shift From Left
70°
Color Shift From Right
70°
Brightness Loss From Left
70°
Brightness Loss From Right
70°
Black Level Raise From Left
70°
Black Level Raise From Right
70°
Gamma Shift From Left
70°
Gamma Shift From Right
70°

The horizontal viewing angle is incredible. Although it isn't perfect, you won't have any issues as the image remains consistent from the sides.

9.9
Picture Quality
Vertical Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Below
70°
Color Washout From Above
70°
Color Shift From Below
70°
Color Shift From Above
70°
Brightness Loss From Below
70°
Brightness Loss From Above
70°
Black Level Raise From Below
61°
Black Level Raise From Above
61°
Gamma Shift From Below
70°
Gamma Shift From Above
70°

The vertical viewing angle is fantastic. There's a bit of color shift going on at wide angles, but you need to stand above the monitor and look down on it from a tight angle to notice any difference.

8.8
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
1.348%
50% DSE
0.120%

The MSI MEG 342C has excellent gray uniformity. Solid colors across the screen look great, and there's no visible dirty screen effect in the center. However, like any OLED, it has thin vertical lines in dark scenes, but they're hard to notice unless you really look for them. You can see examples of what it looks like with darker grays in the Dell Alienware AW3423DW review here, which uses the same panel.

10
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
0.202%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

The MSI 342C has perfect black uniformity. Thanks to its OLED panel, it can turn individual pixels on and off, and there isn't any blooming around bright objects.

8.4
Picture Quality
Color Accuracy (Pre-Calibration)
Picture Mode
sRGB
sRGB Gamut Area xy
109.7%
White Balance dE (Avg.)
0.99
Color Temperature (Avg.)
6,545 K
Gamma (Avg.)
2.28
Color dE (Avg.)
1.50
Contrast Setting
N/A
RGB Settings
Default
Gamma Setting
No Gamma Setting
Brightness Setting
70
Measured Brightness
194 cd/m²
Brightness Locked
No

The accuracy before calibration in the sRGB mode is impressive. Some colors are still oversaturated, and gamma is too dark with really dark and really bright scenes, but other than that, the image is accurate. However, using the sRGB mode locks some settings like the Contrast and Color Temperature. You'd have to use another mode to unlock those settings, but you won't get the same accurate image, as you can see here.

9.4
Picture Quality
Color Accuracy (Post-Calibration)
Picture Mode
User
sRGB Gamut Area xy
101.8%
White Balance dE (Avg.)
0.56
Color Temperature (Avg.)
6,494 K
Gamma (Avg.)
2.19
Color dE (Avg.)
1.46
Contrast Setting
70
RGB Settings
97-98-100
Gamma Setting
No Gamma Setting
Brightness Setting
30
Measured Brightness
103 cd/m²
ICC Profile
Download

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED has fantastic accuracy after a full calibration. While it isn't perfect, you won't notice any inaccuracies.

9.7
Picture Quality
SDR Color Gamut
sRGB Coverage xy
98.9%
sRGB Picture Mode
User
Adobe RGB Coverage xy
95.3%
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
User

The MSI 342C has an incredible SDR color gamut. It displays all the colors needed for the commonly-used sRGB color space. It also displays a wide range of colors in Adobe RGB but oversaturates most colors, which isn't ideal for professional publishing.

10
Picture Quality
SDR Color Volume
sRGB In ICtCp
100.0%
sRGB Picture Mode
User
Adobe RGB In ICtCp
98.9%
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
User

The SDR color volume is incredible. It displays all bright and dark colors without any issues.

9.6
Picture Quality
HDR Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI-P3 Coverage xy
99.5%
DCI-P3 Picture Mode
HDR Peak 1000
Rec. 2020 Coverage xy
80.7%
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
HDR Peak 1000

The HDR color gamut is remarkable. It displays a wide range of colors in both the commonly-used sRGB color space and the wider Rec. 2020 color space. Tone mapping is great with each color space, too, so images are life-like and realistic.

9.5
Picture Quality
HDR Color Volume
DCI-P3 In ICtCp
97.3%
DCI-P3 Picture Mode
HDR Peak 1000
Rec. 2020 In ICtCp
80.9%
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
HDR Peak 1000

The MSI 342C has incredible HDR color volume. Thanks to its QD-OLED panel, it displays colors as bright as pure white, and it doesn't have any issues displaying dark colors either.

9.3
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Glossy
Total Reflections
1.4%
Indirect Reflections
0.9%
Calculated Direct Reflections
0.6%

The glossy screen has fantastic reflection handling, and there aren't any distracting reflections from strong light sources. However, the main downside to using it in a bright room is that the black levels raise and look purple. This is because it lacks a polarizing layer, and it's the same issue as other QD-OLED monitors like the Dell Alienware AW3423DW. You can see examples of this with the Dell next to an IPS monitor, the ViewSonic XG2431, and an OLED monitor, the LG 42 C2 OLED.

Dark roomAW3423DW vs XG2431 reflections - dark room
Bright roomAW3423DW vs XG2431 reflections - bright room
Bright room - with LG C2AW3423DW vs XG2431 vs C2 reflections - bright room room

7.0
Picture Quality
Text Clarity
Pixel Type
QD-OLED
Subpixel Layout
Triangular RGB

The MSI 342C has okay text clarity but isn't as good as other 34-inch, 1440p monitors because of its triangular RGB subpixel layout. It's different from traditional RGB monitors, which have all three subpixels in a straight line, and computer programs are designed to render text with this subpixel layout. This means that text looks worse with a triangular RGB layout. Another downside is that there's color fringing around text, which is worse with ClearType enabled, and there's even color fringing around windows. You'll see a thin green line at the top of every open window and a thin red line at the bottom. The unique subpixel layout causes all this. The text clarity photos are in Windows 10; you can also see them in Windows 11 with ClearType on here and with ClearType off here.

These issues with clarity don't affect everybody, and whether you like it or not is a personal opinion. You can read our own subjective impressions about it here. There are also workarounds to this, as you can use the Better ClearType Tuner utility to try to further improve the text clarity.

You can see other examples of the color fringing with photos that we took with the Dell Alienware AW3423DW, and it's also valid for this monitor as it uses the same panel:

9.7
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit

The MSI MEG 342C has incredible gradient handling, and you won't have any issues with banding of similar shades.

Motion
8.6
Motion
Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
175 Hz
Max Refresh Rate
175 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over DP
175 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over HDMI
175 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over DP @ 10-bit
144 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over HDMI @ 10-Bit
175 Hz
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate (VRR)
FreeSync
Yes
G-SYNC
Compatible (Tested)
VRR Maximum
175 Hz
VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors
DisplayPort, HDMI
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED works without issue with FreeSync VRR and G-SYNC compatibility, and both work over HDMI and DisplayPort.

9.8
Motion
Response Time @ Max Refresh Rate
Recommended Overdrive Setting
No Overdrive
Rise / Fall Time
0.4 ms
Total Response Time
1.4 ms
Overshoot Error
1.8%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
0.5 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
5.7 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
14.7%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TableMotion Blur Photo
No OverdriveChartTablePhoto

The MSI MEG 342C has an incredible response time at its max refresh rate of 175Hz. Motion is extremely clear, thanks to its near-instantaneous response time. However, there's still some persistence blur caused by the sample-and-hold method that OLEDs use. As is the case with other OLED displays, it doesn't have a setting to adjust the pixel overdrive.

9.7
Motion
Response Time @ 120Hz
Recommended Overdrive Setting
No Overdrive
Rise / Fall Time
0.4 ms
Total Response Time
2.1 ms
Overshoot Error
1.8%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
0.8 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
10.0 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
14.9%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TableMotion Blur Photo
No OverdriveChartTablePhoto

The MSI MEG 342C has a fantastic response time that's equally as quick at 120Hz, and motion looks extremely clear.

9.5
Motion
Response Time @ 60Hz
Recommended Overdrive Setting
No Overdrive
Rise / Fall Time
0.4 ms
Total Response Time
3.3 ms
Overshoot Error
2.0%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
0.8 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
16.7 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
15.9%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TableMotion Blur Photo
No OverdriveChartTablePhoto

The response time at 60Hz is once again fantastic. Even though the response times in dark transitions are a bit slower, motion still looks smooth.

Motion
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
No BFI
Maximum Frequency
N/A
Minimum Frequency
N/A
Longest Pulse Width Brightness
N/A
Shortest Pulse Width Brightness
N/A
Pulse Width Control
No BFI
Pulse Phase Control
No BFI
Pulse Amplitude Control
No BFI
VRR At The Same Time
No BFI

The MSI MEG 342C doesn't have an optional black frame insertion feature to reduce persistence blur.

10
Motion
Image Flicker
Flicker-Free
No
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The backlight isn't technically flicker-free because it has a slight dip in brightness that corresponds to the 175Hz refresh rate. However, it isn't considered pulse-width modulation like on LED-backlit monitors because it isn't a full-screen on-and-off flicker, and you won't notice it.

Inputs
8.9
Inputs
Input Lag
Native Resolution @ Max Hz
3.4 ms
Native Resolution @ 120Hz
5.9 ms
Native Resolution @ 60Hz
14.3 ms
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
N/A

The MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED has very low input lag for a responsive feel while gaming, and it doesn't significantly increase at 60Hz.

8.4
Inputs
Resolution And Size
Native Resolution
3440 x 1440
Aspect Ratio
21:9
Megapixels
5.0 MP
Pixel Density
110 PPI
Measured Screen Diagonal
33.9"
Screen Area
409 in²
10
Inputs
PS5 Compatibility
4k @ 120Hz
Yes
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
1080p @ 60Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
Yes

Thanks to its HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, the MSI 342C supports any signal from the PS5, as long as you set the HDMI 2.1 setting to 'Console' instead of 'PC'. Unlike the Samsung Odyssey OLED G8/G85SB S34BG85, it even supports 4k @ 120Hz, as it downscales a 4k signal to 1440p, which results in a more detailed image than native 1440p, but because the PS5 doesn't support ultrawide gaming, you'll see black bars on the sides.

10
Inputs
Xbox Series X|S Compatibility
4k @ 120Hz
Yes
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
1080p @ 60Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
Yes

Thanks to its HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, the MSI MEG 342C QD-OLED supports any signal from the Xbox Series X|S, as long as you set the HDMI 2.1 setting to 'Console' instead of 'PC'. Unlike the Samsung Odyssey OLED G8/G85SB S34BG85, it even supports 4k @ 120Hz, as it downscales a 4k signal to 1440p, which results in a more detailed image than native 1440p, but because the Xbox doesn't support ultrawide gaming, you'll see black bars on the sides.

Inputs
Inputs Photos

The power input is located on the left side of the back, as you can see here. The audio port on the back serves as a combo port with both audio out and mic in, and there are separate ports for each of those on the side.

Inputs
Video And Audio Ports
DisplayPort
1 (DP 1.4)
Mini DisplayPort
No
HDMI
2 (HDMI 2.1)
HDMI 2.1 Rated Speed
48Gbps (FRL 12x4)
DVI
No
VGA
No
Daisy Chaining
No
3.5mm Audio Out
2
3.5mm Audio In
No
HDR10
Yes
3.5mm Microphone In
1
Inputs
USB
USB-A Ports
4
USB-A Rated Speed
5Gbps (USB 3.2 Gen 1)
USB-B Upstream Port
Yes
USB-C Ports
1
USB-C Upstream
Yes
USB-C Rated Speed
5Gbps (USB 3.2 Gen 1)
USB-C Power Delivery
65W
USB-C DisplayPort Alt Mode
Yes
Thunderbolt
No

The 65W of power delivery from the USB-C port is high enough to charge most smaller laptops while you're using them, but it isn't enough for power-hungry, bigger laptops.

Inputs
macOS Compatibility

The MSI 342C works without issue with macOS. VRR works well, and HDR looks great too. The Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL) isn't too aggressive in HDR, so you can enable HDR even on the desktop, and there won't be any distracting changes in brightness. Even if you're using a MacBook, you can close the lid and continue using it if you have it connected over USB-C, and windows return to their position when reopening the lid.

Features
Features
Additional Features
Speakers
No
RGB Illumination
Presets
Multiple Input Display
PIP + PBP
KVM Switch
Yes

The MSI MEG 342C has extra features that improve the user experience. It has a KVM switch that makes it easy to switch between sources and use the same keyboard and mouse connected to the monitor. It works well and is responsive even if changing sources takes a couple of seconds. For example, if you have a MacBook and Windows PC connected and put the MacBook to sleep, the KVM automatically switches to the PC. It performs best when you have Gaming Intelligence installed. On top of the KVM switch, it has Picture-in-Picture and Picture-by-Picture modes to view two images at the same time, and it has different settings for how you can display the images.

As with other OLED panels, it has a few settings to mitigate the risk of permanent burn-in when exposed to the same static elements over time.

  • Pixel Shift: This is meant to move the image by a few pixels at a time so that each pixel isn't always displaying the same thing. You can set it to 'Slow', 'Normal', or 'Fast', so while you can't turn it off, it's very hard to notice it's happening with it set to 'Slow'.
  • Static Screen Detection: Reduces the brightness of static elements, like logos, that are on the screen for a long time.
  • Panel Protect: This feature is to give a full pixel refresh cycle to reduce the risk of permanent burn-in. A message pops up every four hours of usage to run the cycle, which takes a couple of minutes to complete. However, the message can pop up at any time, including while you're gaming. You can cancel it when the message pops up, but it will either pop up again four hours later or run the cycle the next time you turn the monitor off or put it in standby. If you're concerned about the message popping up during critical times of your games, you can also manually run the cycle before the four-hour mark, and you can see how long it's been since the last cycle in the OLED Panel Info page of the settings menu. It also has an option for a longer refresh cycle that takes about an hour and runs after 1,500 hours of usage.

The monitor has some other extra features, like:

  • Ambient RGB Light: Matches the RGB lighting on the monitor to ambient light in your room.
  • HDMI CEC: It supports the HDMI CEC standard, so it will automatically turn on when you power up compatible devices like consoles.
  • HDMI 2.1: There's a setting to change HDMI 2.1 between 'PC' and 'Console'. As the names suggest, you need to set it to 'PC' when you have a PC connected to reach the native resolution and max refresh rate, and 'Console' is used for 4k @ 120Hz gaming from consoles.
  • Smart Crosshair and Optix Scope: These are two different settings for various crosshairs and scope features, making it easier to see opponents in games. Your games' anti-cheating tools won't detect it, giving you a competitive advantage.
  • Sound Tune: There's a mic on the front bezel that supports ANC, but you need to have the USB-B cable plugged into your computer for it work.

Features
On-Screen Display (OSD)

While you can access most of the settings through the on-screen display, you have extra settings with the downloadable Gaming Intelligence program. Some of these settings that are only available with Gaming Intelligence include Ray Tracing, Macro Key, Windows Layout, and mice and keyboard settings.