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ASUS TUF VG27AQ Monitor Review

Tested using Methodology v1.2
Updated May 05, 2020 at 08:06 am
ASUS TUF VG27AQ Picture
7.6
Mixed Usage
7.9
Office
8.0
Gaming
7.2
Media Consumption
7.8
Media Creation
6.1
HDR
Size
27"
Resolution
2560x1440
Max Refresh Rate
165Hz
Pixel Type
IPS
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
HDR10
Yes

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is an impressive 27 inch, 1440p monitor with excellent gaming performance. Thanks to its IPS panel, the image remains accurate at an angle, but blacks look gray in a dark room. It delivers a very responsive gaming experience thanks to its remarkably low input lag, and it has a very fast refresh rate that improves the overall appearance of motion. It also supports FreeSync variable refresh rate technology to reduce screen tearing. Unfortunately, even though it supports HDR, it doesn't display a wide color gamut for HDR content and can't get bright enough to bring out highlights.

Our Verdict

7.6 Mixed Usage

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a great monitor for most uses. This monitor has great resolution and size, a very low input lag, fantastic response time, wide viewing angles, and excellent ergonomics. It's a good choice if you often share your screen either for work or for a co-op gaming session. It's more suitable for an average-lit room as it can't get very bright and can't display deep blacks in a dark room.

Pros
  • Excellent ergonomics.
  • Fantastic response time.
  • Outstanding low input lag.
Cons
  • Can't display deep blacks in a dark room.
  • Lacks a wide color gamut.
7.9 Office

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a great monitor for office use. It has a great resolution and size that favors multitasking. You can easily share your work with a colleague thanks to the excellent ergonomics and the wide viewing angles ensure everyone viewing enjoys the same accurate image. It can get fairly bright to combat glare in most rooms, and thanks to the decent reflection handling, it performs well in most office environments.

8.0 Gaming

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is an excellent monitor for gaming. The input lag is remarkably low and the high resolution and screen real estate allow you to see more details of your gaming arena. Fast-moving content has only minimal blur trail and the excellent refresh rate ensures smooth motion. Finally, the monitor's excellent ergonomics make it easy to position it comfortably on your desk.

7.2 Media Consumption

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is very good for consuming multimedia. The 1440p monitor can display most content at its native resolution, and thanks to the low input lag the monitor feels very responsive to your actions. It has decent reflection handling and wide viewing angles so you can enjoy a movie with a friend in a room that has a few lights without issue.

7.8 Media Creation

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a great monitor for creating media. The large size and great resolution allow you to see more of your work on the screen and the excellent ergonomics make it easy to place the monitor comfortably. The wide viewing angles allow you to collaborate with a colleague sitting next to you, while both enjoying the same accurate image. Finally, you can stay assured of a responsive editing experience due to the monitor's remarkably low input lag.

  • 7.6 Mixed Usage
  • 7.9 Office
  • 8.0 Gaming
  • 7.2 Media Consumption
  • 7.8 Media Creation
  • 6.1 HDR
  1. Updated May 02, 2022: We tested the monitor with the PS5's new variable refresh rate feature and confirmed that it's not compatible, since the PS5 only supports HDMI Forum VRR.
  2. Updated Apr 08, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 1.2.
  3. Updated Feb 17, 2020: Converted to Test Bench 1.1.
  4. Updated Nov 26, 2019: Review published.
  5. Updated Nov 20, 2019: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved
No
Curve Radius
Not Curved

The TUF VG27AQ has the same style as most other ASUS gaming monitors. It has a square-shaped base with some red on it. It's designed as a gaming monitor but doesn't stand out in an office environment.

7.5
Design
Build Quality

Good build quality. It feels slightly cheaper than the ASUS TUF VG32VQ, but is still solid and sturdy without any noticeable issues.

9.3
Design
Ergonomics
Height Adjustment
5.2" (13.2 cm)
Tilt Range
-20° to 5°
Rotate Portrait/Landscape
Yes, Both Ways
Swivel Range
-60° to 60°
Wall Mount
VESA 100x100

The monitor has excellent ergonomics, allowing for all common adjustments, so you can place it in a comfortable position with ease. Simple design on the back. There's cable management through the stand, but there's no quick release on it.

Design
Stand
Base Width
11.1" (28.2 cm)
Base Depth
8.4" (21.3 cm)
Thickness (With Display)
5.4" (13.7 cm)
Weight (With Display)
12.8 lbs (5.8 kg)

The stand supports the monitor well and prevents most wobble.

Design
Display
Housing Width
24.3" (61.8 cm)
Housing Height
14.2" (36.1 cm)
Thickness (Without Stand)
2.8" (7.1 cm)
Weight (Without Stand)
8.6 lbs (3.9 kg)
Borders Size (Bezels)
0.4" (1.0 cm)
Design
Controls

There are four buttons and a joystick on the back to control the on-screen menu.

Design
In The Box
Power Supply
External Brick

  • Power cord
  • Power adapter
  • HDMI cable
  • DisplayPort cable

Picture Quality
6.4
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
1,247 : 1
Contrast With Local Dimming
N/A

The contrast ratio isn't bad. IPS panels don't usually have good native contrast, and this one is better than most. If you want a similar model with a VA panel for a better contrast ratio, check out the TUF VG27VQ.

0
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
Edge

This monitor doesn't have a local dimming feature. The above video is provided for reference only.

7.7
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene
311 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
329 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
329 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
329 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
329 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
328 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
329 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
328 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
329 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
328 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
328 cd/m²
ABL
0.000
Minimum Brightness
132 cd/m²

The VG27AQ has good SDR peak brightness. It's suitable for most rooms, but might not be able to fight glare in a very bright room. There's no noticeable variation with different content, which is great. If intense glare is an issue and you need a monitor that gets brighter, check out the Gigabyte M27Q.

6.3
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
VESA DisplayHDR Certification
No Certification
Real Scene
329 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
357 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
357 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
357 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
357 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
357 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
356 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
357 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
357 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
357 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
357 cd/m²
ABL
0.000

Mediocre HDR peak brightness. There's no variation in brightness with different content, but it doesn't get bright enough to bring out highlights in HDR. If you prefer something that gets brighter in HDR, check out its successor, the ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL1A.

8.1
Picture Quality
Horizontal Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Left
45°
Color Washout From Right
49°
Color Shift From Left
51°
Color Shift From Right
56°
Brightness Loss From Left
45°
Brightness Loss From Right
50°
Black Level Raise From Left
70°
Black Level Raise From Right
70°
Gamma Shift From Left
35°
Gamma Shift From Right
56°

Great horizontal viewing angle, which is typical of an IPS panel. The image remains accurate when viewed from the side, so it's easy to share your screen with others.

7.1
Picture Quality
Vertical Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Below
33°
Color Washout From Above
33°
Color Shift From Below
40°
Color Shift From Above
42°
Brightness Loss From Below
37°
Brightness Loss From Above
37°
Black Level Raise From Below
70°
Black Level Raise From Above
70°
Gamma Shift From Below
33°
Gamma Shift From Above
34°

Decent vertical viewing angle, but you lose some image accuracy if the monitor is mounted above or below eye level.

8.0
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
2.335%
50% DSE
0.153%

The VG27AQ has outstanding gray uniformity. The edges are a bit darker, but it's not noticeable with most content.

6.3
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
1.784%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

Passable black uniformity for a monitor, and it's much better than the PG279QZ and VG279Q, but this could vary from unit to unit. There's still some noticeable clouding throughout, which could be distracting when watching dark scenes.

7.5
Picture Quality
Color Accuracy (Pre-Calibration)
Picture Mode
Racing Mode
sRGB Gamut Area xy
111.1%
White Balance dE (Avg.)
2.84
Color Temperature (Avg.)
7,072 K
Gamma (Avg.)
2.35
Color dE (Avg.)
2.80
Contrast Setting
80
RGB Settings
Warm
Gamma Setting
No Gamma Setting
Brightness Setting
55
Measured Brightness
270 cd/m²
Brightness Locked
No

The TUF Gaming VG27AQ has decent out-of-the-box color accuracy. Some people will notice the inaccuracies in some colors. The gamma doesn't follow the target curve closely and as a result, most scenes are darker. Since the color temperature is warmer than the target, the image has a slight red-yellowish tint. If you want a monitor with better out-of-the-box accuracy, check out the Lenovo Legion Y27q-20.

9.8
Picture Quality
Color Accuracy (Post-Calibration)
Picture Mode
Racing Mode
sRGB Gamut Area xy
100.9%
White Balance dE (Avg.)
0.64
Color Temperature (Avg.)
6,454 K
Gamma (Avg.)
2.18
Color dE (Avg.)
0.34
Contrast Setting
80
RGB Settings
98-100-99
Gamma Setting
No Gamma Setting
Brightness Setting
0
Measured Brightness
136 cd/m²
ICC Profile
Download

Superb color accuracy post-calibration. Only a few of the remaining inaccuracies can be spotted by the trained eye without the aid of a colorimeter.

8.6
Picture Quality
SDR Color Gamut
sRGB Coverage xy
95.7%
sRGB Picture Mode
Racing
Adobe RGB Coverage xy
74.2%
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Racing

The TUF Gaming VG27AQ has an excellent SDR color gamut that covers most of the common sRGB color space, with okay coverage of the wider Adobe RGB color space, which might not be enough for professional photo editors.

9.4
Picture Quality
SDR Color Volume
sRGB In ICtCp
96.6%
sRGB Picture Mode
Racing
Adobe RGB In ICtCp
81.0%
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Racing

Excellent SDR color volume. The monitor displays rich, saturated colors in most luminosities. Unfortunately, it can't display dark colors well due to its low contrast ratio.

6.6
Picture Quality
HDR Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
No
DCI-P3 Coverage xy
80.5%
DCI-P3 Picture Mode
HDR Gaming
Rec. 2020 Coverage xy
56.7%
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
HDR Gaming

The VG27AQ has a mediocre HDR color gamut, and can't display a wide color gamut for HDR content.

7.0
Picture Quality
HDR Color Volume
DCI-P3 In ICtCp
72.2%
DCI-P3 Picture Mode
HDR Gaming
Rec. 2020 In ICtCp
52.4%
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
HDR Gaming

Mediocre HDR color volume. It's limited by its color gamut and the low contrast ratio, and can't deliver dark, saturated colors.

7.3
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Matte
Total Reflections
5.6%
Indirect Reflections
3.2%
Calculated Direct Reflections
2.5%

The TUF Gaming VG27AQ monitor has decent reflection handling. You shouldn't have any issues if your room has a few lights, but if you place it across a large window then the reflections can be distracting. This is similar to the Gigabyte Aorus AD27QD.

7.0
Picture Quality
Text Clarity
Subpixel Layout
RGB

Text clarity is decent. It's recommended to turn on ClearType (top photo), as it significantly improves the appearance of diagonal lines, as seen on the R and N.

8.8
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
8 Bit

The VG27AQ's gradient handling is excellent. There's some banding in darker shades, but this shouldn't be noticeable with most content.

Motion
8.5
Motion
Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
144 Hz
Max Refresh Rate
165 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over DP
165 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over HDMI
144 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over DP @ 10-bit
120 Hz
Max Refresh Rate Over HDMI @ 10-Bit
60 Hz
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate (VRR)
FreeSync
Yes
G-SYNC
Compatible (NVIDIA Certified)
VRR Maximum
165 Hz
VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors
DisplayPort, HDMI

The TUF Gaming VG27AQ has an excellent native refresh rate and can be easily overclocked to 165Hz. It supports AMD's FreeSync variable refresh rate technology and is also NVIDIA certified, for a nearly tear-free gaming experience.

Over HDMI, the VRR range at 1440p can go up to 144Hz.

Note: Some websites advertise the VG27AQ with a 155Hz overclock instead of 165Hz. ASUS originally announced this model with a 155Hz overclock, but it was released with 155Hz, 160Hz, and 165Hz options. Some websites are still reporting the original information.

8.0
Motion
Response Time @ Max Refresh Rate
Recommended Overdrive Setting
80
Rise / Fall Time
4.1 ms
Total Response Time
10.3 ms
Overshoot Error
6.0%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
5.6 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
15.6 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
27.4%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
0ChartTablePhoto
20ChartTablePhoto
40ChartTablePhoto
60ChartTablePhoto
80ChartTablePhoto
100ChartTablePhoto

Fantastic response time at its max refresh rate. The best Overdrive setting, which is called 'Trace Free', is '80'. It has the clearest motion out of all the settings, but there's overshoot in some brighter transitions. If that bothers you, the '60' setting performs very similarly, with a bit less overshoot. If you want a 1440p monitor with a quicker response time, then look into the MSI Optix G273QF.

7.7
Motion
Response Time @ 120Hz
Recommended Overdrive Setting
60
Rise / Fall Time
4.7 ms
Total Response Time
10.6 ms
Overshoot Error
5.1%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
7.3 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
18.1 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
28.6%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
0ChartTablePhoto
20ChartTablePhoto
40ChartTablePhoto
60ChartTablePhoto
80ChartTablePhoto
100ChartTablePhoto

6.0
Motion
Response Time @ 60Hz
Recommended Overdrive Setting
20
Rise / Fall Time
5.7 ms
Total Response Time
18.4 ms
Overshoot Error
10.2%
Worst 3 Rise / Fall Time
9.8 ms
Worst 3 Total Response Time
32.1 ms
Worst 3 Overshoot Error
41.0%

Overdrive SettingResponse Time ChartResponse Time TablesMotion Blur Photo
0ChartTablePhoto
20ChartTablePhoto
40ChartTablePhoto
60ChartTablePhoto
80ChartTablePhoto
100ChartTablePhoto

The VG27AQ has an okay response time at 60Hz. The best Overdrive setting is '0' as there's no overshoot and there's no visible ghosting with fast-moving objects like the other settings. Since this is different than the setting at its max refresh rate, you might have to change it when playing games at 60Hz. If response time at 60Hz is important to you, then check out the ViewSonic Elite XG270QG.

Motion
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
Yes
Maximum Frequency
165 Hz
Minimum Frequency
75 Hz
Longest Pulse Width Brightness
176 cd/m²
Shortest Pulse Width Brightness
176 cd/m²
Pulse Width Control
No
Pulse Phase Control
No
Pulse Amplitude Control
Yes
VRR At The Same Time
Yes

Refresh RateVRRMotion Blur Photo
60HzOnPhoto
120HzOnPhoto
120HzOffPhoto

This monitor has an optional black frame insertion feature to improve the appearance of motion. Unlike most monitors, this feature is available at the same time as FreeSync. The setting is known as 'ELMB SYNC'.

10
Motion
Image Flicker
Flicker-Free
Yes
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQ has a flicker-free backlight, which helps reduce eye strain.

Inputs
9.0
Inputs
Input Lag
Native Resolution @ Max Hz
3.5 ms
Native Resolution @ 120Hz
4.8 ms
Native Resolution @ 60Hz
8.3 ms
Backlight Strobing (BFI)
4.8 ms

The TUF Gaming VG27AQ's input lag is remarkable. It remains low even at 60Hz, which is important for console gamers.

8.0
Inputs
Resolution And Size
Native Resolution
2560 x 1440
Aspect Ratio
16:9
Megapixels
3.7 MP
Pixel Density
109 PPI
Measured Screen Diagonal
27.0"
Screen Area
310 in²

The VG27AQ has an excellent resolution and provides you with a great amount of screen real estate. It favors multitasking and allows you to see more details of your gaming arena. This is much better than similar displays with lower native resolutions, like the MSI Optix G273.

6.0
Inputs
PS5 Compatibility
4k @ 120Hz
No
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
1440p @ 120Hz
PS5 doesn't output 1440p
1440p @ 60Hz
PS5 doesn't output 1440p
1080p @ 120Hz
No
1080p @ 60Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
No
8.3
Inputs
Xbox Series X|S Compatibility
4k @ 120Hz
No
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
No
1080p @ 60Hz
Yes
HDR
Yes
VRR
Yes
Inputs
Inputs Photos
Inputs
Video And Audio Ports
DisplayPort
1 (DP 1.2)
Mini DisplayPort
No
HDMI
2 (HDMI 2.0)
HDMI 2.1 Rated Speed
No HDMI 2.1
DVI
No
VGA
No
Daisy Chaining
No
3.5mm Audio Out
1
3.5mm Audio In
No
3.5mm Microphone In
No
Inputs
USB
USB-A Ports
0
USB-A Rated Speed
No USB-A Ports
USB-B Upstream Port
No
USB-C Ports
0
USB-C Upstream
No USB-C Ports
USB-C Rated Speed
No USB-C Ports
USB-C Power Delivery
No USB-C Ports
USB-C DisplayPort Alt Mode
No USB-C Ports
Thunderbolt
No
Inputs
macOS Compatibility

This monitor works great with MacBooks. It's a bit slow to wake up from sleep mode, but that's not exclusive to Macs, and windows are restored to their original positions. VRR and HDR both work well, but there's some flickering with VRR enabled at lower refresh rates, close to the VRR minimum of 48Hz.

Features
Features
Additional Features
Speakers
Yes
RGB Illumination
No
Multiple Input Display
No
KVM Switch
No

The TUF Gaming VG27AQ gives you the option to add a timer to your game but has no more additional features to enhance your gaming experience.

Features
On-Screen Display (OSD)

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 27 inch ASUS TUF VG27AQ, which is the only size available for this model. There are other TUF Gaming models available, some of which are listed below. We don't expect our review to be valid for the other models.

Some websites advertise the ASUS TUF VG27AQ with a 155Hz overclock instead of 165Hz. ASUS originally announced this model with a 155Hz overclock, but it was released with 155Hz, 160Hz, and 165Hz options. Some websites are still reporting the original information.

If someone comes across a different type of panel or if their VG27AQ doesn't correspond to our review, let us know and we will update the review. Note that some tests such as gray uniformity may vary between individual units.

Model Size Resolution Refresh Rate Panel Type
TUF VG32VQ 32" 1440p 144Hz VA
TUF VG27AQ 27" 1440p 165Hz IPS
TUF VG27BQ 27" 1440p 165Hz TN
TUF VG35VQ 35" 3440x1440p 100Hz VA
STRIX XG32VQR 32" 1440p 144Hz VA

The unit we reviewed was manufactured in July 2019.

Compared To Other Monitors

The ASUS VG27AQ is an excellent gaming monitor and outperforms many other 27 inch, 1440p VA monitors we've tested. See also our recommendations for the best monitors, the best gaming monitors, and the best 1440p gaming monitors.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL1A

The ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL1A and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ perform very similarly. The VG27AQL1A has a slightly higher max refresh rate, it gets much brighter in HDR, displays a wide color gamut, and has a quicker response time at 60Hz. However, the VG27AQ has better ergonomics, better out-of-the-box accuracy, and its BFI feature works over a wider frequency range.

Gigabyte M27Q

The Gigabyte M27Q and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ perform very similarly. They're both 27 inch IPS monitors with a 1440p resolution. The Gigabyte has better response times at max refresh rate and 60Hz. Its refresh rate is slightly higher, 170Hz compared to the ASUS' 165Hz, but this isn't noticeable. Although both monitors have a Black Frame Insertion feature, only the ASUS' can be used simultaneously with VRR, and it works over a wider frequency range than the Gigabyte. The Gigabyte has more features for productivity, including a USB-C port with DisplayPort Alt Mode and Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture, but its BGR sub-pixel layout might bother some people as it can affect text clarity in some instances.

Dell S2721DGF

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is slightly better than the Dell S2721DGF overall, but the Dell might be a better choice. The ASUS has better vertical viewing angles, and the unit we tested has better black uniformity, but this varies. On the other hand, the Dell has much better reflection handling and faster response time, resulting in clearer motion.

Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is slightly better than the Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q. The ASUS has better ergonomics, but its build quality isn't as good as the FI27Q. The ASUS also has a better contrast ratio and a significantly better black uniformity, but the Gigabyte has better color accuracy, can get brighter, and has much more extra features.

BenQ EX2780Q

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is better than the BenQ EX2780Q in most uses. The ASUS has a much better build quality, significantly better ergonomics, and it has a black frame insertion feature that can help reduce the appearance of motion blur. Its refresh rate is also slightly higher, but the BenQ has better viewing angles and it can get much brighter.

LG 27GP850-B

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is slightly better than the LG 27GP850-B for most uses, but the LG is better for gaming. The ASUS has much better ergonomics, so it might be easier to find an ideal viewing position. The ASUS also has a more versatile black frame insertion feature, as it's available across a wider range of refresh rates. The LG is better for gaming, though, as it has a much faster response time, especially for console gamers.

LG 27GL850-B

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is somewhat better than the LG 27GL850-B. The ASUS has a faster refresh rate that makes motion look smoother, and better ergonomics to help you place it comfortably on your desk. It supports a black frame insertion (BFI) feature that helps improve the overall appearance of motion and can also deliver more uniform blacks. The LG, on the other hand, has a faster response time, so fast-moving content has almost no blur, making the lack of BFI not an issue.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG27WQ1B

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is better overall than the ASUS TUF Gaming VG27WQ1B, but they have different panel types. The VG27AQ has an IPS panel with wider viewing angles and it gets a bit brighter in HDR. It also has a much quicker response time at its max refresh rate, it has lower input lag and much better ergonomics. However, the VG27WQ1B has a VA panel with much better contrast, it has a quicker response time at 60Hz, and it displays a wide color gamut for HDR content.

LG 27GN800-B

Physically, the ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a little better than the LG 27GN800-B. It feels better built and has a much better, more adjustable stand. That said, when it comes to performance, the LG has the upper hand, as long as you can overlook its cheap stand. While its refresh rate can't be overclocked like the ASUS, the LG has faster response times with less overshoot at both 60Hz and at max. It also has a wider color gamut and delivers a more satisfying HDR experience. 

LG 27GL83A-B

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is better than the LG 27GL83A for mixed usage. Though they both have an IPS panel, the ASUS has a much better contrast ratio and black uniformity. Ergonomics are also significantly better on the ASUS, but the LG has a faster response time and better color accuracy out of the box.

Samsung Odyssey G5 LC27G55T

Gaming-wise, the ASUS TUF VG27AQ performs better than the Samsung Odyssey G5 LC27G55T because it has a slightly higher refresh rate and faster response time to deliver a clearer image with less smearing behind fast-moving objects. The ASUS has better ergonomics, and its IPS panel provides wider viewing angles. However, the Samsung is better suited for dark rooms because it uses a VA panel that produces much deeper blacks.

ASUS VG279Q

The ASUS TUF VG29AQ is better than the ASUS VG279Q. Though they both have an IPS panel, the TUF VG27AQ has a higher resolution, a slightly faster refresh rate due to its factory overclock, and has HDR support. On the other hand, the VG279Q has better ergonomics, can get brighter, and has better reflection handling. Unfortunately, its black uniformity is quite poor.

Gigabyte G27Q

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a bit better overall than the Gigabyte G27Q. The ASUS has a higher 165Hz refresh rate with a faster response time at 60Hz to make motion look smoother. It also has much better ergonomics, making it easier to place in an ideal viewing position. However, the Gigabyte is better for well-lit rooms because it gets brighter and has better reflection handling.

MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD

The MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ are two excellent gaming monitors; they each have a 1440p resolution and a 165Hz refresh rate. Motion looks smoother on the MSI thanks to its quick response time, especially at 60Hz. However, the ASUS has a BFI feature that works at a wider refresh rate range than the MSI, and it can also be used when VRR is enabled, which the MSI can't do.

Samsung Odyssey G5 S27AG50

The Samsung Odyssey G5 S27AG50 and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ are both excellent gaming monitors. The Samsung has a native 165Hz refresh rate, and while the ASUS has a native refresh rate of 144Hz, you can overclock it to 165Hz. However, motion handling is much better on the Samsung because it has a quicker response time, and it also gets brighter and has better reflection handling if you want to use it in a bright environment. As for the ASUS, it feels better built, and it has much better ergonomics because it has a wider swivel range, and you can rotate it into portrait mode in both directions.

Acer Nitro XV272U KVbmiiprzx

The Acer Nitro XV272U KVbmiiprzx and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ are very similar overall. The Acer performs better for gaming because it has faster response times at max refresh, and especially at 60Hz. The Acer also supports a wide color gamut, which the ASUS doesn't, and it gets brighter in HDR.

ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ perform similarly overall, although they occupy different positions in ASUS's gaming lineup. The ROG series is meant to be more premium while the TUF series is more budget-friendly. That said, there are a few key differences between these two monitors that give the XG27AQ a slight edge, especially for gaming. The XG27AQ has a significantly faster response time than the VG27AQ at max refresh rate and especially at 60Hz. The XG27AQ also has a much wider color gamut in both SDR and HDR, and it has wider viewing angles, although the VG27AQ has better ergonomics and gets a little brighter to combat glare, so it may be better suited to an office environment.

MSI Optix G273QF

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is better for most uses than the MSI Optix G273QF, mainly because it has more features. The ASUS supports HDR10, which the MSI doesn't, and it has significantly better ergonomics, allowing you to place the screen in an ideal position. In terms of gaming, both monitors are similar. They each have a BFI feature, but the one on the ASUS can be used with VRR enabled, which can't be done on the MSI. However, the MSI has a much better response time at its max refresh rate and 60Hz, resulting in smoother motion.

LG 27GN850-B

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a bit better for most uses than the LG 27GN850-B. They're both 1440p monitors with a native 144Hz refresh rate, but the ASUS can be overclocked to 165Hz. The ASUS has much better ergonomics, making it easier to place in an ideal viewing position. The LG has a quicker response time at its max refresh rate and 60Hz, but the ASUS has a Black Frame Insertion feature to clear up motion blur.

Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ and the Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T are both excellent gaming monitors; however, they're also very different. The Samsung is a VA panel monitor available in a 27 inch and 32 inch size, while the ASUS is an IPS monitor and only comes in a 27 inch. The Samsung performs better gaming-wise because it has a higher refresh rate and faster response times. It's also a better choice for viewing HDR content because it has a wider color gamut, higher contrast ratio, and higher peak brightness. If you plan on using it for work, you might want to go with the ASUS. It allows for more ergonomic adjustments so that you can place the screen at a comfortable viewing position, and its wider viewing angles make it easier to share your work with coworkers and clients.

Samsung Odyssey G7 S28AG70

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ and the Samsung Odyssey G7 S28AG70 are both excellent for gaming, but they have different features. The ASUS is a 1440p monitor and the Samsung has a 4k resolution. While they both have a native 144Hz refresh rate, the ASUS is overclockable to 165Hz. Motion looks smoother on the Samsung thanks to the quicker response time, and it has HDMI 2.1 inputs that allow high-frame-rate gaming. On the other hand, the ASUS has much better ergonomics because it has a wider swivel range.

AOC CQ27G2

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is much better than the AOC CQ27G2. The ASUS uses an IPS panel, which results in better viewing angles, but worse contrast. The ASUS has better ergonomics, a higher peak brightness, and faster response times. The ASUS supports HDR, but this doesn't add much, unfortunately. On the other hand, the AOC has much better contrast, so blacks look black in a dark room instead of gray.

Gigabyte G27QC

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is much better than the Gigabyte G27QC. The ASUS has better ergonomics, wider viewing angles, faster response time, and a Black Frame Insertion feature. The Gigabyte has a higher contrast ratio, better reflection handling, and its response time at 60Hz is much quicker.

ASUS TUF VG27VQ

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a much better monitor than the ASUS TUF VG27VQ. The VG27AQ has a higher resolution at 1440p and it has better viewing angles, response time, gray uniformity, and it supports HDR. On the other hand, the VG27VQ uses a VA panel instead of an IPS panel, so it has a much better contrast ratio, making it better suited for dark rooms. 

ASUS VG279QM

The ASUS VG279QM is slightly better than the ASUS TUF VG27AQ for gaming. The VG279QM has a faster response time, resulting in clearer motion with less blur, especially at 60Hz. The VG279QM is a lot brighter, especially in HDR. On the other hand, the VG27AQ has a higher native resolution, making it a slightly better choice for multitasking.

ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q

The ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ are two very similar-performing monitors. The XG279Q has a slightly higher max refresh rate, it gets brighter, displays a wide color gamut for HDR, and has a quicker response time. However, the VG27AQ has lower input lag, the BFI feature can flicker at a lower frequency, and it has much better ergonomics.

ASUS TUF VG32VQ

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is significantly better than the ASUS TUF VG32VQ. Though they share the same design, the VG27AQ has an IPS panel with much better viewing angles, color accuracy, and black uniformity. On the other hand, the VG32VQ's VA panel has a better contrast ratio, can get brighter, and has better reflection handling for bright room viewing, though its motion handling isn't as good.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG259QM

Overall, the ASUS TUF VG27AQ is marginally better than the ASUS TUF Gaming VG259QM. The VG29AQ has a higher 1440p resolution and wider viewing angles. However, the VG259QM has a higher refresh rate and faster response time.

ASUS ROG Swift PG279QM

The ASUS ROG Swift PG279QM is slightly better than the ASUS TUF VG27AQ. The PG279QM has a much faster response time, especially at 60Hz, resulting in clearer motion overall. The VG27AQ has an optional backlight strobing feature to improve the appearance of motion, but it still doesn't look as good as the PG279QM. There's also a difference in supported variable refresh rates, as the PG279QM natively supports G-SYNC, resulting in a more visually consistent gaming experience if you have an NVIDIA graphics card.

Lenovo Legion Y27q-20

Overall, the ASUS TUF VG27AQ is marginally better than the Lenovo Legion Y27q-20. The ASUS has better ergonomics and a Black Frame Insertion feature. The Lenovo has faster response time, better gradient handling, and significantly better color accuracy out of the box.

ViewSonic VX2758-2KP-MHD

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is much better than the ViewSonic VX2758-2KP-MHD. The ASUS has significantly better build quality and ergonomics, and it supports HDR. Additionally, the ASUS has a better contrast ratio and its refresh rate can be factory overclocked to 165Hz. However, the ViewSonic has much better reflection handling and significantly better black uniformity.

LG 27GN880-B

The LG 27GN880-B and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ are both 27 inch, 1440p monitors with an IPS panel. Gaming-wise, the ASUS' refresh rate can be overclocked up to 165Hz to make motion appear smoother and for better responsiveness, but its response times aren't as good, at max refresh rate and especially at 60Hz. However, the ASUS has a Black Frame Insertion feature that works simultaneously with VRR to improve motion clarity. Although both monitors have excellent ergonomics, the LG's stand takes up less space. Also, the LG can display a wide color gamut for HDR, whereas the ASUS can't.

ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a bit better than the ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q. Both monitors deliver the same excellent gaming experience and are among the best we've tested so far for gaming. The TUF supports FreeSync variable refresh rate (VRR) technology, while the ROG supports G-SYNC VRR. Their difference in overall performance is mainly due to the HDR support that the TUF provides and due to its faster refresh rate that helps motion look smoother.

Acer Nitro VG271UP Pbmiipx

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is significantly better than the Acer Nitro VG271UP Pbmiipx. The ASUS has much better ergonomics, black uniformity, as well as a faster response time. However, the Acer has better color accuracy and can get brighter in HDR content. Additionally, the Asus' refresh rate can be factory overclocked to 165Hz, providing a smoother gaming experience overall.

ViewSonic Elite XG270QG

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is better than the ViewSonic Elite XG270QG. The ASUS supports FreeSync, has much better ergonomics, better contrast and black uniformity, the out-of-box color accuracy is significantly better, and it supports HDR. On the other hand, the ViewSonic supports G-SYNC and has a quicker response time, which is much better at 60Hz than the ASUS, a better SDR color gamut, and it has better reflection handling.

ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV

The ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ are from different series in ASUS's lineup. The ProArt is meant for productivity and content creation, whereas the TUF is part of ASUS's budget gaming series. That said, they're both versatile and perform well overall. The TUF is better for gaming thanks to its high refresh rate and fast response time, although the ProArt actually has a faster response time at 60Hz. The ProArt also has a slightly wider color gamut and more accurate colors out of the box, though this can vary between units. On the other hand, the TUF supports HDR. 

ViewSonic Elite XG270

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is better than the ViewSonic Elite XG270 for most uses. The ASUS has a higher resolution and its stand has much better ergonomics; however, its refresh rate is significantly lower and it can't get as bright as the ViewSonic. The ASUS' black uniformity is much better, but the ViewSonic has a slightly faster response time.

LG 27UK650-W

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ and the LG 27UK650-W are quite different monitors, but overall, the ASUS performs better. It has a 1440p resolution but it has a high 165Hz refresh rate, while the LG has a 4k panel, but a 60Hz refresh rate. The ASUS is better built and has better ergonomics. However, If you use the monitor for work, the LG is better for text clarity.

Acer Predator XB271HU Bmiprz

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is much better than the Acer Predator XB271HU Bmiprz. The TUF supports HDR and has a faster refresh rate that improves the appearance of motion. The TUF supports FreeSync for nearly tear-free gaming, while the Predator supports G-SYNC for the same purpose. The TUF has better reflection handling, which is great for a room with a few more lights, and can also display more uniform blacks in a dark room. However, neither of the two monitors can display deep blacks in a dark room due to their IPS panels.

Acer Predator X27 bmiphzx

The Acer Predator X27 and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ are very different monitors. The Acer is a 4k monitor with native G-SYNC support, while the ASUS has a 1440p resolution and has native FreeSync support. They both have IPS panels with wide viewing angles, but the contrast ratio is much better on the ASUS. Although both support HDR, only the Acer is capable of displaying a wide color gamut. Build quality is better on the Acer, but the ASUS has better ergonomics, as it has a much wider swivel range.

Dell S2719DGF

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is significantly better than the Dell S2719DGF. The ASUS has an IPS panel that provides much better viewing angles, contrast ratio, black uniformity, and it supports HDR. However, the Dell has a significantly better motion handling, peak brightness, and reflection handling.

MSI Optix G273

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is significantly better than the MSI Optix G273. The ASUS has a higher native resolution, resulting in much better text clarity and sharper images. The ASUS also has a much better stand, so it's easier to place it in an ideal viewing position. The ASUS is also way better for gaming, as it has a much faster response time, and it supports 4k downscaling, which is great for PS5 and Xbox Series X gamers.

HP OMEN 27i

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is much better than the HP OMEN 27i for most users. The ASUS has much better ergonomics, so it's easier to place it in an ideal viewing position. The ASUS also supports HDR, and it has an optional Black Frame Insertion feature. While the ASUS is slightly better overall for gaming, some gamers might prefer the HP, as it has a much faster response time when gaming on a console at 60Hz.

Acer Nitro XV273 Xbmiiprzx

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is slightly better than the Acer Nitro XV273 Xbmiiprzx in mixed usage. Though the Asus has a maximum refresh rate of 165Hz, it has a higher resolution, providing better picture quality, and is a better choice for multitasking. It has a higher contrast ratio, but doesn't quite match the color accuracy of the Acer and can't get as bright.

Samsung C49RG9/CRG9

The Samsung C49RG9/CRG9 and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ are very different monitors. The Samsung has a 32:9 aspect ratio, which is twice the size of the ASUS. The ASUS performs better overall, as it has an IPS panel with wider viewing angles, and it has better ergonomics as well as a faster response time. Also, the ASUS has a 165Hz refresh rate compared to Samsung's 120Hz,  but the Samsung's VA panel has a higher native contrast ratio and better reflection handling.

ASUS ROG Strix XG16AHPE

The ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQ and the ASUS ROG Strix XG16AHPE are very different monitors, each with strengths and weaknesses. The VG27AQ is a traditional desktop monitor with a higher native resolution and excellent ergonomics, whereas the XG16AHPE is a small portable monitor with limited ergonomics and a lower native resolution.

AOC CQ27G1

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a significantly better monitor than the AOC CQ27G1. The ASUS can rotate to portrait mode, which the AOC can't, it has much better viewing angles and supports HDR. The ASUS can also get brighter, but the AOC has better color accuracy out of the box and performs better in dark rooms due to its high contrast ratio.

Razer Raptor 27 144Hz

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is better than the Razer Raptor 27 144Hz. The ASUS has a higher native refresh rate, and a faster response time, resulting in clearer motion with less blur behind fast-moving objects. The ASUS also has a more adjustable stand, and it can be VESA mounted. The Razer, on the other hand, has a nicer design, with a unique RGB lighting feature around the base.

Gigabyte AORUS AD27QD

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is somewhat better than the Gigabyte AORUS AD27QD. The ASUS' refresh rate is faster, which helps motion look smoother. The ASUS also has better ergonomics, which is important if you often move your monitor around as you can quickly position it comfortably in the new location. Finally, the ASUS delivers more uniform blacks, although neither of the two monitors can display deep blacks in a dark room due to their IPS panels.

Dell S3220DGF

Overall, the ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a better monitor than the Dell S3220DGF for most uses. Although it has a smaller screen size, the Asus has the same 1440p resolution as the Dell. The ASUS has an IPS panel with wide viewing angles, but the Dell's VA panel offers a much better contrast ratio, and it can also get brighter to fight glare in bright rooms. The ASUS has a faster response time, a black frame insertion feature, and its ergonomics are better than the Dell.

MSI Optix G27C5

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is significantly better than the MSI Optix G27C5. The ASUS has an IPS panel with wide viewing angles, it has a 1440p resolution, much better ergonomics, and higher peak brightness. It also has a quicker response time and built-in speakers. However, the MSI has a much better contrast ratio due to its VA panel, and it has slightly lower input lag and better reflection handling.

Dell Alienware AW3420DW

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is significantly better than the Dell Alienware AW3420DW. The ASUS has a much higher refresh rate, much better contrast ratio, and it can get a lot brighter. Viewing angles and ergonomics are also much better on the ASUS; however, the Dell has a better build quality, a larger screen, and better text clarity.

ASUS ROG Swift PG279QZ

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is better than the ASUS ROG Swift PG279QZ. The TUF VG27AQ has better ergonomics, HDR support, and better black uniformity, but the ROG Swift has native support for G-SYNC, a slightly faster response time, and better reflection handling. Its out-of-box color accuracy is also better than the TUF VG27AQ.

Acer Nitro RG241Y Pbiipx

Overall, the ASUS TUF VG27AQ is much better than the Acer Nitro RG241Y Pbiipx. The ASUS has a bigger screen, a higher resolution, and significantly better ergonomics. It gets brighter and has wider viewing angles. On the other hand, the Acer has better gradient handling, better reflection handling, and a faster response time at 60Hz.

Samsung CHG70

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is much better than the Samsung CHG70. The Asus has better ergonomics and viewing angles, but the contrast ratio isn't as good. Black uniformity is significantly better on the ASUS; however, it can't get as bright as the Samsung, particularly in HDR content.

Dell U2719D

The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is significantly better than the Dell U2719D. The ASUS has a much higher refresh rate, much better motion handling, and supports FreeSync. It also supports HDR and has a lower input lag, but the Dell has better color accuracy, reflection handling, and a slightly higher peak brightness.

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