Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED TV Review

Tested using Methodology v1.6
Updated Feb 16, 2021 at 02:15 pm
Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED Picture
8.3
Mixed Usage
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
8.1
Movies
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
8.4
TV Shows
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung QN85A QLED
8.4
Sports
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
8.5
Video Games
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
7.9
HDR Movies
Value for price beaten by
: Vizio OLED 2020
8.4
HDR Gaming
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
8.8
PC Monitor
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung QN85A QLED
This TV was replaced by the Samsung Q80/Q80A QLED
Type LED
Sub-Type
VA
Resolution 4k

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is an impressive 4k TV, delivering fantastic picture quality in nearly every type of content. It has a VA panel that can produce deep blacks and a full-array local dimming to further improve black levels. It has excellent color accuracy out-of-the-box and an impressive HDR color gamut to produce a wide range of colors. Its viewing angles are decent thanks to Samsung's 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, so you don't lose too much image accuracy when viewed from the side. It handles reflections remarkably well and gets very bright, enough to fight glare and to deliver a good HDR experience. It has exceptionally low input lag, a 120Hz refresh rate, and support for variable refresh rate (VRR) technology to reduce screen tearing. Unfortunately, the screen has some minor uniformity issues that can be distracting for some, although this can vary between units.

Note: We received reports that the Q80T has visible stuttering and judder when watching sports. This could be most noticeable with cable sports. If you've experienced the same thing, let us know.

Our Verdict

8.3 Mixed Usage

The Samsung Q80T is an impressive all-around TV. It's great for watching movies or other content in the dark thanks to its high contrast ratio, but it also performs well in bright rooms because of its high peak brightness and incredible reflection handling. HDR content also looks good since it has a wide color gamut and gets bright enough for some highlights to pop. It has an excellent response time, so motion looks clear in fast-moving content like video games or sports, and it comes with advanced features like VRR support.

Pros
  • Excellent response time.
  • Great contrast ratio.
  • Remarkable reflection handling.
Cons
  • Corners of the screen appear darker.
8.1 Movies

The Samsung Q80T is great for watching movies. It has a high contrast ratio, although not quite as high as expected for a VA panel. It also has a full-array local dimming feature to further improve black levels. 1080p movies are upscaled well without artifacts, but lower frame rate content can stutter due to the TV's fast response time.

Pros
  • Excellent out-of-the-box color accuracy.
  • Great contrast ratio.
  • Decent local dimming.
Cons
  • Stutters when displaying lower frame rate content.
8.4 TV Shows

The Samsung Q80T is impressive for watching TV shows. It handles reflections remarkably well and gets very bright, so you shouldn't have issues placing it in a well-lit room. It also has decent viewing angles, making it easier to watch in a larger room or wider seating arrangements since the image doesn't look as washed out from the side. It also upscales lower resolution content, like cable TV, without issue.

Note: We received reports that the Q80T has visible stuttering and judder when watching cable TV, especially sports. If you've experienced the same thing, let us know.

Pros
  • Remarkable reflection handling.
  • Decent viewing angles.
  • Gets bright enough to overcome glare.
Cons
  • Corners of the screen appear darker.
  • Reported judder issues with cable sports.
8.4 Sports

The Samsung Q80T is an impressive TV for watching sports. It has an amazing response time, so fast-moving action looks smooth. You should have no problems watching in a well-lit room, either, since it has incredible reflection handling and gets very bright. Its viewing angles are decent, so the image doesn't look too washed out from the side if you prefer watching the game with friends. Unfortunately, there's a bit of dirty screen effect that may be distracting to some during sports.

Note: We received reports that the Q80T has visible stuttering and judder when watching sports. This could be most noticeable with cable sports. If you've experienced the same thing, let us know.

Pros
  • Excellent response time.
  • Remarkable reflection handling.
  • Decent viewing angles.
Cons
  • Some dirty screen effect.
  • Reported judder issues with cable sports.
8.5 Video Games

The Samsung Q80T is an impressive tv for video games. It has an amazing response time, resulting in clear motion and an incredibly low input lag that makes gaming feel responsive. It also has a great contrast ratio, which is ideal for gaming in the dark. Unfortunately, though, the local dimming in 'Game' mode is disappointing, as it doesn't do much. On the upside, it supports VRR and has an HDMI 2.1 port for next-gen consoles.

Pros
  • Excellent response time.
  • Variable refresh rate support.
  • Low input lag.
Cons
  • Local dimming is ineffective in 'Game' mode.
7.9 HDR Movies

The Samsung Q80T is very good for watching movies in HDR. It has a great contrast ratio that's enhanced by a full-array local dimming feature, allowing it to produce deep blacks. It can display a wide color gamut and gets bright enough to bring out some highlights in HDR content. It can also remove judder from any source, but lower frame rate content like movies can appear to stutter due to the TV's fast response time.

Pros
  • Excellent out-of-the-box color accuracy.
  • Great contrast ratio.
  • Decent local dimming.
Cons
  • Stutters when displaying lower frame rate content.
8.4 HDR Gaming

The Samsung Q80T is great for HDR gaming. Its input lag stays incredibly low even with 10-bit HDR, and it has an amazing response time that results in clear motion. While it has a great contrast ratio to produce deep blacks, its local dimming feature doesn't improve much in 'Game' mode. Also, HDR is a bit darker than it should be in 'Game' mode, so highlights don't pop quite as they should.

Pros
  • Excellent response time.
  • Variable refresh rate support.
  • Low input lag.
Cons
  • Local dimming is ineffective in 'Game' mode.
8.8 PC Monitor

The Samsung Q80T is an amazing TV to use as a PC monitor. It supports all common resolutions, including chroma 4:4:4, which is important for text clarity. It also has a fast response time and a low input lag for a responsive desktop experience. The viewing angles are decent, although you may still notice the edges of the screen look washed out when sitting up close.

Pros
  • Excellent response time.
  • Low input lag.
  • Displays proper chroma 4:4:4.
Cons
  • Corners of the screen appear darker.
  • 8.3 Mixed Usage
  • 8.1 Movies
  • 8.4 TV Shows
  • 8.4 Sports
  • 8.5 Video Games
  • 7.9 HDR Movies
  • 8.4 HDR Gaming
  • 8.8 PC Monitor
  1. Updated Jun 23, 2021: We remeasured the thickness and added new local dimming videos featuring real content.
  2. Updated Apr 27, 2021: Retested the TV after Sony released a PS5 firmware update to confirm that HDR now works on the PS5 in 4k @ 120Hz.
  3. Updated Mar 01, 2021: Updated review for accuracy and clarity.
  4. Updated Mar 01, 2021: Converted to Test Bench 1.6.
  5. Updated Nov 11, 2020: Retested the TV with an HDMI 2.1 source.
  6. Updated Nov 03, 2020: Updated review for accuracy and clarity.
  7. Updated Sep 30, 2020: We've changed the status of the Auto-Calibration function from 'Untested' to 'Undetermined'.
  8. Updated Aug 19, 2020: Update to HDMI Forum VRR support.
  9. Updated Aug 04, 2020: We updated the refresh rate to clarify that the 49" model has a 60Hz refresh rate.
  10. Updated Jun 05, 2020: We've retested the input lag with the latest firmware update (version 1113).
  11. Updated May 21, 2020: Converted to Test Bench 1.5.

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Video

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Market Context
Market Context
Market Context

The Samsung Q80T is a mid-range TV in Samsung's high-end 4k QLED TV lineup. It sits below the flagship Samsung Q90/Q90T QLED and above the Samsung Q70/Q70T QLED. Since Samsung has shifted its entire lineup this year, this is a replacement of the Samsung Q80/Q80R QLED in name only, as its performance and features are closer to that of the Samsung Q70/Q70R QLED. Its main competitors are the Sony X950H, Vizio P Series Quantum X 2020, and the Hisense H9G.

Design
Design
Style
Curved No

The Samsung Q80T has a simple and minimalist design with thin bezels on all sides. It's center-mounted on a pedestal-style stand.

Design
Stand

The stand is a mix of metal and plastic. It provides decent support for the TV, but there's still a fair amount of wobble. Luckily, it's fairly small and doesn't take up much space, making it easier to place a soundbar in front.

Footprint of the 55 inch stand: 15.4" x 10.3".

Design
Back
Wall Mount VESA 200x200

The back of the TV is plastic, and it's plain except for the fine horizontal texture etched into it. The inputs are side-facing and are easily accessible when the TV is wall-mounted, and grooves guide the cables towards the stand, which is hollow and serves as cable management.

Design
Borders
Borders 0.35" (0.9 cm)

The bezels on the Samsung Q80T are thin and aren't distracting.

Design
Thickness
Max Thickness 2.46" (6.3 cm)

Update 06/23/2021: We've updated the thickness of the TV to include the thickness of the power plug, as it sticks out a bit from the back panel of the TV.

The TV is quite thin without the stand and shouldn't stick out much when wall-mounted.

8.5
Design
Build Quality

Build quality feels excellent. It's mostly plastic, but it feels well-built and sturdy overall. The TV does wobble when nudged, mostly due to the design of the stand.

Picture Quality
8.0
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
3,042 : 1
Contrast with local dimming
4,225 : 1

The Samsung Q80T has a great native contrast ratio, but it's lower than typical for a VA panel. This is likely due to the implementation of Samsung's 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, which improves viewing angles at the expense of contrast ratio. The contrast does improve when local dimming is enabled, but blacks can still appear grayish in some scenes.

The 49 inch variant doesn't have the 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer and is expected to have a higher native contrast ratio.

8.1
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene Peak Brightness
407 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
537 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
709 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
682 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
465 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
424 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
529 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
685 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
667 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
463 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
422 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.030

Great SDR peak brightness. It's more than enough to fight glare in bright rooms, but there's quite a bit of variation in brightness when displaying different content.

We measured the peak brightness after calibration, using the 'Movie' Picture Mode, with Brightness set to maximum, and Local Dimming set to 'High'.

If you don't mind losing a bit of image accuracy, you can get a brighter image by setting the Picture Mode to 'Dynamic', Local Dimming to 'High', and Brightness to max. We achieved a peak brightness of 761cd/m² in the 10% window with these settings.

7.0
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
Yes
Backlight
Full-Array

Update 06/23/2021: We've added two new videos demonstrating the local dimming feature with real content.

This TV has a decent full-array local dimming feature. The implementation has been tweaked to light up more zones at once, which has the effect of reducing intense blooming around bright objects but also causes a larger section of the screen to appear grayish. That said, it isn't as noticeable in real content, and subtitles are handled well. It's still a bit slow in reacting to changes and can sometimes cause the corners of the screen to flash when the whole screen is gray. The performance is very close to that of the Sony X900F.

5.5
Picture Quality
Local Dimming In Game Mode
Local Dimming
Yes
Backlight
Full-Array

Update 06/23/2021: We've added two new videos demonstrating the local dimming feature with real content.

In 'Game' mode, the local dimming doesn't do much, especially with real content. There's very little black crush or other noticeable flaws with the local dimming, but neither is there much noticeable improvement in dark scenes. For instance, the local dimming barely reacts to subtitles. When there is a long stretch of dark content, it may dim the scene a little but not by much. Because it's less aggressive, transitions between zones are quite smooth and not very noticeable. However, sometimes the local dimming seems to behave differently, as with the moving circles where it dims the background more aggressively and zone transitions become more visible, but it quickly goes back to its more ineffective behavior. What all of this means is that you likely won't notice the effects of local dimming much when in 'Game' mode.

7.5
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
Real Scene Highlight
702 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
528 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
739 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
607 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
461 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
438 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
522 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
717 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
603 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
460 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
436 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.029

Good HDR brightness. HDR content looks especially good if you're watching in a dark to moderately-lit room. Overall scenes are a little brighter than they should be, but very bright highlights don't quite pop as intended. As with SDR, there's quite a bit of variation in brightness depending on the content.

We measured the HDR peak brightness before calibration, using the 'Movie HDR' Picture Mode, with Local Dimming set to 'High', and all other image processing disabled.

If you find HDR too dim, you can make it brighter by setting Brightness and Contrast to maximum, set ST.2084 to maximum, and set Contrast Enhancer to 'High'. Using these settings, you can make HDR appear significantly brighter, as you can see in this EOTF. If you want a TV with higher HDR peak brightness, check out the Sony X950H.

6.7
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness In Game Mode
Real Scene Highlight
512 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
358 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
509 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
481 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
503 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
430 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
356 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
506 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
479 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
500 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
429 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.021

In 'Game' mode, the HDR brightness is okay. It's a bit more consistent across content but doesn't get as bright overall and highlights don't stand out as much. The replacement to this TV, the Samsung Q80/Q80A QLED, gets significantly brighter in 'Game' mode.

We tested the brightness in the 'Game' Picture Mode, using the 'Warm 2' Color Temperature, with Local Dimming set to 'High', Color Gamut on 'Auto', Dynamic Black Equalizer set to '2', and Sharpness set to '0'. Motion interpolation and other additional settings were disabled.

7.3
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
3.356%
50% DSE
0.199%
5% Std. Dev.
0.500%
5% DSE
0.096%

The Samsung Q80T has decent gray uniformity, although this can vary between units. The corners of the screen look darker, and there's a bit of dirty screen effect throughout the screen. Luckily, uniformity is much better in darker scenes.

8.0
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
0.824%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
1.253%

The Samsung Q80T has great black uniformity, but this can vary between individual units. There's a bit of clouding throughout the screen, and the overall image looks a bit more grayish. With local dimming enabled, the clouding is less noticeable, and there's a bit less blooming around the test cross.

7.1
Picture Quality
Viewing Angle
Color Washout
37°
Color Shift
45°
Brightness Loss
45°
Black Level Raise
70°
Gamma Shift
20°

The Samsung Q80T has decent viewing angles for a VA panel TV. It has Samsung's 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, which improves viewing angles at the cost of a lower contrast ratio. Gamma shift happens rather quickly once you move off-center, but black level remains fairly consistent until you reach moderate viewing angles. To take our measurements, we had to perform two runs, one with local dimming set to 'Low' to measure color, and the other with local dimming disabled to measure lightness, black level, and gamma. Overall, viewing angles are better with the local dimming disabled.

The TV's local dimming can't be disabled through the normal settings menu. To turn it off, you must first disable PC Mode Dimming within the TV's service menu, and then activate PC Mode.

The 49 inch variant of this TV doesn't have the 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, and we expect it to have worse viewing angles.

9.4
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Glossy
Total Reflections
1.3%
Indirect Reflections
0.8%
Calculated Direct Reflections
0.5%

Superb reflection handling. The screen's anti-reflective coating performs remarkably well at reducing the intensity of reflected light, making it a great choice for fairly well-lit rooms. However, the light scatters across the screen, creating a rainbow-like effect. This can be most noticeable in rooms with a lot of light, especially when you're watching dark content here. You can see examples of it from Reddit here.

8.8
Picture Quality
Pre Calibration
White Balance dE
1.68
Color dE
1.47
Gamma
2.13
Color Temperature
6,365 K
Picture Mode
Movie
Color Temp Setting
Warm 2
Gamma Setting
2.2

The Samsung Q80T has excellent color accuracy out-of-the-box. There are only minor inaccuracies that are very difficult to spot with the naked eye, and white balance is also fantastic. However, the color temperature is a bit on the warm side, and gamma doesn't follow the target all that well, causing most scenes to appear brighter than they should. Note that color accuracy can vary between units.

9.6
Picture Quality
Post Calibration
White Balance dE
0.23
Color dE
0.89
Gamma
2.20
Color Temperature
6,503 K
White Balance Calibration
20 point
Color Calibration
Yes

Update 09/30/2020: We've changed the status of the Auto-Calibration function from 'Untested' to 'Undetermined', as the Samsung Q80T isn't yet listed as being compatible with CalMAN.

After calibration, color accuracy is incredible. White balance, gamma, and color temperature are right on target, and any remaining inaccuracies shouldn't be noticeable without the aid of a colorimeter.

You can see our recommended settings here.

8.0
Picture Quality
480p Input

480p content like DVDs is upscaled without any obvious artifacts, and it looks very similar, if not identical, to the Samsung Q70/Q70R QLED and the Samsung Q70/Q70T QLED.

8.0
Picture Quality
720p Input

720p content such as cable TV is upscaled well, with no signs of upscaling artifacts.

9.0
Picture Quality
1080p Input

There are no issues upscaling 1080p content.

10
Picture Quality
4k Input

Native 4k content is displayed perfectly.

0
Picture Quality
8k Input

The Samsung Q80T can't display an 8k signal.

Picture Quality
Pixels

The pixels are a bit blurry due to the 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer. It is, however, much clearer than what we had observed on the Samsung Q80/Q80R QLED. You can also see the filter in this photo.

8.0
Picture Quality
Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI P3 xy
88.53%
DCI P3 uv
92.29%
Rec 2020 xy
66.17%
Rec 2020 uv
73.79%

The Samsung Q80T has a great color gamut. It has excellent coverage of the DCI P3 color space, which is used for most HDR content, and it has decent coverage of the wider Rec. 2020 color space. If you want a TV with a wider color gamut, check out the Vizio P Series Quantum X 2020.

7.8
Picture Quality
Color Volume
Normalized DCI P3 Coverage ITP
86.9%
10,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage ITP
42.6%
Normalized Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
68.6%
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
33.5%

Good color volume. It's slightly better than the Samsung Q80/Q80R QLED, but it can't reproduce dark colors as well due to its lower contrast ratio.

7.9
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit
Red (Std. Dev.)
0.111
Green (Std. Dev.)
0.125
Blue (Std. Dev.)
0.110
Gray (Std. Dev.)
0.098

Very good gradient performance. The most visible banding is with the color green, but there's also some fine banding when displaying shades of gray, red, and blue. If this bothers you, enabling Noise Reduction in the Picture Clarity Settings menu can remove most of it, although it may cause the loss of some fine details.

10
Picture Quality
Temporary Image Retention
IR after 0 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 2 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 4 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 6 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 8 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 10 min recovery
0.00%

There are no signs of temporary image retention, but this can vary between individual units.

10
Picture Quality
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Permanent Burn-In Risk
No

We don't expect VA panels to experience burn-in, as the VA panel in our long-term test appears immune.

Motion
8.6
Motion
Response Time
80% Response Time
2.8 ms
100% Response Time
10.1 ms

This tv has an excellent response time. There should be very little blur trail behind fast-moving objects. That said, there's significant overshoot in some transitions, which is more visible when motion interpolation is enabled. If you want an even quicker response time, check out the LG CX OLED.

9.9
Motion
Flicker-Free
Flicker-Free
No
PWM Dimming Frequency
960 Hz

This TV uses Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) to dim its backlight, but since it flickers at such a high frequency, it shouldn't be noticeable to most people. In 'Movie' mode, the flickering frequency drops to 120Hz when Picture Clarity is set to 'Custom' or 'Auto'. The flickering is also at 120Hz when using the 'Dynamic', 'Standard', 'Natural', or 'Game' mode.

10
Motion
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Optional BFI
Yes
Min Flicker For 60 fps
60 Hz
60Hz For 60 fps
Yes
120Hz For 120 fps
Yes
Min Flicker for 60 fps in Game Mode
60 Hz

This TV has an optional Black Frame Insertion feature that can help reduce motion blur, called LED Clear Motion.

Just enabling Picture Clarity lowers the flickering frequency to 120Hz, and turning on LED Clear Motion reduces the frequency further to 60Hz.

In 'Game' mode, the backlight always flickers at 120Hz, and enabling LED Clear Motion in the Game Motion Plus Settings menu lowers the flickering frequency to 60Hz.

Motion
Motion Interpolation
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
Yes
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
Yes

The Samsung Q80T can interpolate lower frame rate content up to 120Hz, a feature also known as the 'Soap Opera Effect'. There are very little artifacts in regular content, even in intense scenes. To use it, set Picture Clarity to 'Custom', then set Judder Reduction to '10' for 30fps content, or Blur Reduction to '10' for 60fps content.

6.8
Motion
Stutter
Frame Hold Time @ 24 fps
31.6 ms
Frame Hold Time @ 60 fps
6.6 ms

Due to the TV's fast response time, lower frame rate content can appear to stutter, as each frame is held on for a longer period. If this bothers you, enabling Picture Clarity or LED Clear Motion can help.

Note: We received reports that the Q80T has visible stuttering and judder when watching sports. This could be most noticeable with cable sports. If you've experienced the same thing, let us know.

10
Motion
24p Judder
Judder-Free 24p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60i
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via Native Apps
Yes

The Samsung Q80T can remove judder from all sources. To do so, set Picture Clarity to 'Custom', and leave the Blur Reduction and Judder Reduction sliders at '0'.

The 49 inch variant of this TV has a 60Hz panel and likely can't remove judder at all. If you have the 49 inch model, please let us know in the discussions below.

Note: We received reports that the Q80T has visible stuttering and judder when watching sports. This could be most noticeable with cable sports. If you've experienced the same thing, let us know.

9.4
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
120 Hz (except 49", 50")
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes (except 49", 50")
HDMI Forum VRR
Unknown
FreeSync
Yes (except 49", 50")
G-SYNC Compatible
Yes (except 49", 50")
4k VRR Maximum
120 Hz
4k VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
1080p VRR Maximum
120 Hz
1080p VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
1440p VRR Maximum
120 Hz
1440p VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors
HDMI

Update 11/11/2020: We retested the VRR range with an HDMI 2.1 source and measured a wider VRR range than before.

Update 08/19/2020: We changed HDMI Forum VRR to 'Unknown' because we currently don't have an accurate way to test for HDMI Forum VRR compatibility. Once we do, we'll test for it and update the review.

This TV supports FreeSync and is G-SYNC compatible to reduce screen tearing when gaming. It has a very wide VRR range with an HDMI 2.1 source, which is great, and there isn't any screen tearing. However, there are no settings as it turns on automatically when the TV detects a game being launched from a device that has VRR enabled. Game Motion Plus can't be used when VRR is enabled.

The 49 inch variant of this TV has a 60Hz panel and doesn't support any VRR technology.

Inputs
9.7
Inputs
Input Lag
1080p @ 60Hz
10.1 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
79.5 ms
1440p @ 60Hz
9.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz
9.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz + 10-Bit HDR
9.7 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
9.9 ms
4k @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
66.4 ms
4k @ 60Hz With Interpolation
22.0 ms
8k @ 60Hz
N/A
1080p @ 120Hz
5.4 ms
1440p @ 120Hz
5.3 ms
4k @ 120Hz
5.8 ms
1080p with Variable Refresh Rate
6.4 ms
1440p with VRR
7.2 ms
4k with VRR
7.1 ms
8k with VRR
N/A

Update 11/11/2020: We retested the input lag with an HDMI 2.1 source, including the input lag at 4k @ 120Hz.

Update 06/05/2020: We've retested the input lag after updating to the latest firmware (version 1113). The input lag when playing 4k @ 60Hz + 10-bit HDR dropped by 3.4ms, 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 dropped by 4.5ms, and 1080p @ 60Hz outside of 'Game' mode dropped by 7.2ms. The rest are the same or within the margin of error.

The Samsung Q80T has exceptionally low input lag as long as you're using 'Game' mode. It's a bit higher when using VRR or Game Motion Plus, but even then, it's still excellent and should be fine for most casual gamers.

9.6
Inputs
Supported Resolutions
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes (native support)
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
4k @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
8k @ 30Hz or 24Hz
No
8k @ 60Hz
No

Update 11/11/2020: We retested the TV with an HDMI 2.1 source and checked to make sure it supports 4k @ 120Hz.

This TV supports most common resolutions, including 4k @ 120Hz on HDMI 4. It displays proper chroma 4:4:4 at any resolution except 1440p @ 120Hz. To display chroma 4:4:4 properly, set the icon to 'PC' for the input in use. For signals that require the full bandwidth of HDMI 2.0, enable Input Signal Plus.

Inputs
Advanced Console Compatibility
Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM)
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 120Hz + HDR
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 120Hz
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Yes
PS5, 1440p @ 120Hz
PS5 can't do 1440p
PS5, 1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
PS5, Variable Refresh Rate
PS5 can't do VRR yet
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 120Hz + HDR
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Yes
Xbox Series X, 1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, 1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, Variable Refresh Rate
Yes

Update 04/27/2021: We retested the TV with the PS5, and it can now display 4k @ 120Hz with HDR. It appears to have been an issue with the PS5 that Sony resolved in the latest PS5 firmware update.

This TV supports almost all resolutions for next-gen gaming consoles, including 4k @ 120Hz. It has an Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) as well, which is activated by setting Game Mode to 'Auto' and enabling CEC.

Inputs
Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Yes
HDR10+
Yes
Dolby Vision
No
HLG
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
HDMI 2.1 Class Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 4)
CEC Yes
HDCP 2.2 Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
USB 3.0
No
Variable Analog Audio Out No
Wi-Fi Support Yes (2.4 GHz, 5 GHz)

Update 11/11/2020: We retested the TV and confirmed it supports HDMI 2.1 on HDMI 4.

Inputs
Input Photos
Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI 4
USB 2
Digital Optical Audio Out 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm 0
Analog Audio Out RCA 0
Component In 0
Composite In 0
Tuner (Cable/Ant) 1
Ethernet 1
DisplayPort 0
IR In 0
SD/SDHC 0
Inputs
Audio Passthrough
ARC
Yes (HDMI 3)
eARC support
Yes
Dolby Atmos via TrueHD via eARC
Yes
DTS:X via DTS-HD MA via eARC
No
5.1 Dolby Digital via ARC
Yes
5.1 DTS via ARC
No
5.1 Dolby Digital via Optical
Yes
5.1 DTS via Optical
No

The Samsung Q80T supports eARC, allowing it to pass uncompressed high-quality audio like Dolby Atmos via TrueHD over an HDMI connection. To use it, set HDMI eARC to 'Auto' and Digital Output Audio to 'Passthrough'.

Sound Quality
7.4
Sound Quality
Frequency Response
Low-Frequency Extension
71.27 Hz
Std. Dev. @ 70
3.42 dB
Std. Dev. @ 80
3.65 dB
Std. Dev. @ Max
5.35 dB
Max
90.2 dB SPL
Dynamic Range Compression
3.07 dB

The Samsung Q80T has a decent frequency response. It has a digital room correction feature that can tune the sound according to your room's acoustics. It sounds fairly well-balanced, and there's a decent amount of bass, but it's not the room-shaking, rumbling kind. Dialogue sounds clear, and the TV can get quite loud, albeit with a bit of pumping at higher volume levels.

7.0
Sound Quality
Distortion
Weighted THD @ 80
0.122
Weighted THD @ Max
0.395
IMD @ 80
2.95%
IMD @ Max
8.97%

Distortion performance is decent. It sounds fairly clean at moderate listening level, but there's a good amount of distortion when playing at high levels. Distortion depends on the content, though, and not everyone may hear it.

Smart Features
8.0
Smart Features
Interface
Smart OS Tizen
Version 2020
Ease of Use
Easy
Smoothness
Very Smooth
Time Taken to Select YouTube
2 s
Time Taken to Change Backlight
6 s
Advanced Options
Many

Samsung's Tizen OS is a great platform that's easy to use and runs very smoothly. You may encounter an issue with the picture size when switching out of PC mode into something else, causing the image to appear cut off due to overscan. If so, you can resolve this issue by navigating into the Picture Size settings and by enabling 16:9 and 'Fit to Screen'.

0
Smart Features
Ad-Free
Ads
Yes
Opt-out
No
Suggested Content in Home
Yes
Opt-out of Suggested Content
No

There are ads and suggested content on the home page as well as within the app store, and they can't be disabled.

8.5
Smart Features
Apps and Features
App Selection
Great
App Smoothness
Average
Cast Capable
Yes
USB Drive Playback
Yes
USB Drive HDR Playback
Yes
HDR in Netflix
Yes
HDR in YouTube
Yes

Samsung's app store has a large number of streaming services available. Most apps run pretty smoothly, and you can also cast content from a mobile device.

8.5
Smart Features
Remote
Size
Small
Voice Control
Many Features
CEC Menu Control
Yes
Other Smart Features
Yes
Remote App Samsung SmartThings

The remote is the same as other QLED TVs. It has a few shortcuts for popular streaming services and an Ambient mode button, which displays artwork on the TV when not in use. There's also a built-in microphone for voice control through Samsung's Bixby.

Smart Features
TV Controls

The TV's controls are located beneath the Samsung branding at the center of the TV. It consists of one button that lets you turn the TV On/Off, change channels, volume, and input.

Smart Features
In The Box

  • Remote control
  • 2 x AAA batteries
  • User guide

Smart Features
Misc
Power Consumption 67 W
Power Consumption (Max) 187 W
Firmware 1113

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 55" (QN55Q80T) variant, and for the most part, we expect our review to be valid for the 49" (QN49Q80T), 50" (QN50Q80T), the 65" (QN65Q80T), the 75" (QN75Q80T), and the 85" (QN85Q80T) variants. Do note that the 49" and 50" variants have a 60Hz panel and don't support any variable refresh rate technology. Also, the 49" doesn't have Samsung's 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer.

Note that the EU version of the Q80T is different. It doesn't have the 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, and local dimming may perform worse. The Q85T, which is exclusive to the EU, appears to be the closest model to the one we've tested.

Size US Canada UK Warehouse Variant Refresh rate FreeSync
49" QN49Q80TAFXZA QN50Q80TAFXZC QE49Q80TATXXU  QN49Q8DTAFXZA 60Hz No
50"  QN50Q80TAFXZA QN50Q80TAFXZC - - 60Hz No
55" QN55Q80TAFXZA QN55Q80TAFXZC QE55Q80TATXXU QN55Q8DTAFXZA 120Hz Yes
65" QN65Q80TAFXZA QN65Q80TAFXZC QE65Q80TATXXU  QN65Q8DTAFXZA 120Hz Yes
75" QN75Q80TAFXZA QN75Q80TAFXZC QE75Q80TATXXU QN75Q8DTAFXZA  120Hz Yes
85" QN85Q80TAFXZA QN85Q80TAFXZC QE85Q80TATXXU QN85Q8DTAFXZA  120Hz Yes

If someone comes across a different type of panel or their Samsung Q80T doesn't correspond to our review, let us know and we'll update the review. Note that some tests, such as gray uniformity, may vary between individual units.

Update 08/31/2020: Samsung added a 50 inch model that's only sold in the United States and appears to have the same features as the 49 inch model.

Our unit of the QN55Q80T was manufactured in February 2020, you can see the label here.

Compared To Other TVs

Comparison picture

Top left: LG SM9500 (65SM9500). Bottom left: Samsung Q80R (QN55Q80R). Middle: Samsung Q80T (QN55Q80T). Top right: Samsung Q70R (QN55Q70R). Bottom right: Sony X950G (XBR55X950G).

The Samsung Q80T is an impressive TV for most uses. Unlike many TVs with VA panels, it has fairly wide viewing angles thanks to Samsung's 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, although it comes at the expense of contrast, which is a bit lower than some of the Q80T's competitors. For other options, check out our recommendations for the best TVs, the best HDR gaming TVs, and the best 4k gaming TVs.

Samsung Q80/Q80A QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung Q80/Q80A QLED replaces the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED in name, but they use different panel types and have different strengths and weaknesses. The QN80A has an ADS panel that has wider viewing angles. It also gets much brighter, especially in HDR in Game Mode. On the other, the Q80T has a VA panel with a much better contrast ratio and better local dimming for an improved dark room experience. The Q80T also has much better reflection handling.

Samsung Q70/Q70T QLED
55" 65" 75" 82" 85"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is better than the Samsung Q70/Q70T QLED for most uses. The Q80T has a full-array local dimming feature, can get brighter in HDR, and has much wider viewing angles. The Q80T also has better color accuracy and a faster response time, but due to its 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, its contrast ratio is much lower than the Q70T, making blacks look a bit more grayish.

Sony X900H
55" 65" 75" 85"

For most uses, the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is better than the Sony X900H. The Samsung has a faster response time, lower input lag, and it supports VRR, making it a better option for gaming. The Samsung also gets brighter in HDR content to make highlights pop and its reflection handling is significantly better. However, the Sony has a higher contrast ratio and better local dimming, so it's a little better for dark room viewing, and although it doesn't have VRR support now, it should come in a future firmware update.

Sony X950H
49" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The Sony X950H and the Samsung Q80/Q80T perform very similarly overall. The Samsung is better for gaming, as it has a lower input lag, a faster response time, and supports VRR. On the other hand, the Sony has better local dimming and black uniformity, as well as higher HDR brightness, so it may be the better option if you watch a lot of movies in either SDR or HDR. 

LG CX OLED
48" 55" 65" 77"

The LG CX OLED is better than the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED. The LG is able to produce perfect blacks, has wide viewing angles, and a near-instantaneous response time thanks to its OLED panel. The Samsung, however, can get brighter, and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in that comes with OLEDs. That said, burn-in shouldn't be an issue if you watch varied content.

Sony X90J
50" 55" 65" 75"

The Sony X90J and the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED are similar. They both have a VA panel with a 120Hz refresh rate. The Sony has a better contrast ratio than the Samsung, although that's mainly because the Samsung has the 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, which improves viewing angles at the cost of contrast. The Sony gets brighter in SDR and HDR, but it doesn't handle reflections as well as the Samsung. The Samsung has a wider color gamut, faster response times, and lower input lag. It supports VRR to reduce screen tearing when gaming, whereas the Sony's VRR support isn't available yet.

Samsung Q60/Q60T QLED
43" 50" 55" 58" 65" 75" 82" 85"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is higher-end than the Samsung Q60/Q60T QLED and has much better performance. The Q80T has a local dimming feature that improves its contrast and it has Samsung 'Ultra Viewing Angle' technology that improves the viewing angles. The Q80T also has VRR support and a much quicker response time for a better gaming experience. However, because the Q60T doesn't have an 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, it has a much better native contrast ratio.

Samsung Q80/Q80R QLED
55" 65" 75" 82"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED and the Samsung Q80/Q80R QLED are very similar TVs in many respects. The Q80R can get much brighter in HDR, its local dimming performs better, and it has a higher contrast ratio. On the other hand, the Q80T has better color accuracy, a faster response time, and a lower input lag, which is good news for gamers. Both TVs have a 120Hz refresh rate and support VRR to reduce screen tearing when gaming.

Samsung QN85A QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung QN85A QLED and the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED are both great QLEDs but they differ in significant ways. The QN85A is a Neo QLED with Mini LED backlighting, and the 55 inch that we tested uses an IPS panel with a low native contrast ratio and wider viewing angles. The Q80T, on the other hand, uses a VA panel, so it has a much higher contrast ratio and produces deeper blacks with less blooming. The Q80T also has a faster response time. That said, the Q80T has issues with local dimming in 'Game' mode, whereas the QN85A doesn't and its contrast is better than the native contrast suggests thanks to local dimming with actual content. The QN85A also gets much brighter in both SDR and HDR, so it may be a better option if you watch a lot of content in HDR, since it can really make highlights pop.

Samsung QN90A QLED
50" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung QN90A QLED is better overall than the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED. The QN90A uses Mini LED as its backlighting, so it gets significantly brighter and has improved local dimming, especially in 'Game Mode'. Other than that, each TV has the same inputs with HDMI 2.1 support. The QN90A is better for HDR content since it gets significantly brighter and has a slightly wider color gamut.

Samsung Q800T 8k QLED
65" 75" 82"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is better overall than the Samsung Q800T 8k QLED. The Q80T is a 4k TV with a better contrast ratio, better uniformity, improved reflection handling, a quicker response time, and much better out-of-the-box color accuracy. On the other hand, the Q800T is an 8k TV with slightly better viewing angles and it can get much brighter. There still isn't much 8k content to really take advantage of the Q800T's 8k capability. 

Samsung Q70/Q70A QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is a bit better overall than the Samsung Q70/Q70A QLED. While it has a lower contrast ratio as a result of its 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, it also has a local dimming feature to improve black levels, while the Q70A doesn't. Unfortunately, the Q80T suffers a bit when in 'Game Mode', as the local dimming and HDR brightness perform worse. Still, it has a slightly quicker response time, so motion looks clear. It also delivers a better HDR experience overall since it gets brighter than the Q70A in HDR.

Hisense H9G
55" 65"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED and the Hisense H9G are two very similar-performing TVs, but the Samsung has a slight edge because it's more versatile. The Samsung has great gaming features like VRR support and a low input lag, and it has also wider viewing angles, better color accuracy, and handles reflections better. On the other hand, the Hisense has a much better contrast ratio, it has a better full-array local dimming feature, so it's better for dark room viewing.

Samsung TU8000
43" 50" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T is higher up in the Samsung lineup than the Samsung TU8000, and so has better overall performance. The Q80T has a local dimming feature, HDMI 2.1 support, and VRR support for gaming, all of which the TU8000 doesn't have. The Q80T gets much brighter and displays a wider color gamut, so it has much better HDR performance. With Samsung's 'Ultra Viewing Angle' technology, the Q80T has wider viewing angles, but that means the TU8000 has a better native contrast ratio.

Samsung Q70/Q70R QLED
49" 55" 65" 75" 82" 85"

Overall, the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is better than the Samsung Q70/Q70R QLED. The Q80T has a faster response time, better color accuracy, and it has much wider viewing angles thanks to its 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer. Reflection handling is also significantly better on the Q80T, but the Q70R has a higher native contrast ratio as well as better black uniformity. 

Samsung Q90/Q90R QLED
65" 75" 82"

The Samsung Q90/Q90R QLED and the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED perform very similarly overall. The Q90R has a slightly better contrast ratio, better local dimming, and better black uniformity, so it outperforms the Q80T when it comes to dark room viewing. The Q90R also uses Samsung's One Connect box for your inputs, which can be more convenient if you're wall-mounting your TV. On the other hand, the Q80T has slightly better viewing angles, a faster response time, and much more accurate colors out-of-the-box, though this can vary between units.

Samsung Q90/Q90T QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung Q90/Q90T QLED and the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED are very much alike, as they offer identical features. The biggest difference is in terms of performance, where the Q90T performs slightly better than the Q80T. The Q90T has a higher contrast ratio and peak brightness, and it has much better gradient performance, resulting in less banding. However, the Q80T has better color accuracy and black uniformity, although these could be due to panel variance.

LG BX OLED
55" 65"

The LG BX OLED is a better overall than the Samsung Q80T QLED. Thanks to its OLED panel, the LG has an infinite contrast ratio, wider viewing angles, and a near-instant response time. The Samsung does get brighter, has a lower input lag, and doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in. That said, burn-in shouldn't be an issue if you watch varied content, so all in all, the LG is a better choice if you want stunning picture quality.

Sony X950G
55" 65" 75" 85"

For most uses, the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED performs better than the Sony X950G. The Q80T has a faster response time, leading to less motion blur, and it has lower input lag in addition to having VRR support, making it better for gaming. However, the X950G has a much higher peak brightness, better gradient performance, and has better out-of-the-box color accuracy, though this can vary between units.

LG C9 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG C9 OLED is better overall than the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED. Thanks to its OLED panel, the LG produces perfect blacks, resulting in an unparalleled viewing experience for movies, especially in HDR. The viewing angles on the LG are also much better, and it has a near-instantaneous response time, resulting in clear motion. On the other hand, the Samsung has more accurate colors out-of-the-box and can get brighter. The Samsung also uses an LCD panel that doesn't suffer the risk of permanent burn-in, like the OLED. It's worth noting, though, that this likely won't be an issue for most OLED owners who watch varied content.

Hisense U8G
55" 65"

The Hisense U8G is slightly better than the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED for most uses. The Hisense has better contrast, better black uniformity, and a better local dimming feature, so blacks look better in a dark room. On the other hand, the Samsung has better viewing angles, so it's a better choice for a brighter environment with a wide seating arrangement.

LG NANO90 2021
55" 65" 75" 86"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is much better than the LG NANO90 2021, but they use different panels. The Samsung has a VA panel with a much higher contrast ratio, and while the LG's IPS panel is supposed to have wider viewing angles, the Samsung still wins here because of its 'Ultra Viewing Angle' technology. Also, the Samsung gets brighter, making it a better choice for use in well-lit rooms or for watching HDR content. They have similar gaming features like a 120Hz panel and VRR support, but the Samsung has better motion handling.

LG NANO90 2020
55" 65" 75" 86"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is better overall than the LG NANO90 2020, even though they use different panel types. The Samsung has a VA panel and a full-array local dimming feature that allow it to produce deep blacks. It also gets brighter and has better out-of-the-box color accuracy. Even though the LG has an IPS panel, the viewing angles are better on the Samsung because of its 'Ultra Viewing Angle' technology.

LG NANO85
49" 55" 65" 75"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is better than the LG NANO85, but they have different panel types with different characteristics. The Samsung's VA panel has a higher contrast ratio, and its local dimming feature is much better, so it's a better choice for watching content in dark rooms. It also gets much brighter in HDR and is a better choice for gaming because its VRR support works, which it doesn't on the LG. On the other hand, the LG has an IPS panel with a bit wider viewing angles, even though the Samsung has an 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer.

TCL 6 Series/R635 2020 QLED
55" 65" 75"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is better for most uses than the TCL 6 Series/R635 QLED, but they both offer very good picture quality. The Samsung has HDMI 2.1 support, so it supports 4k @ 120Hz games, and its quick response time results in smoother motion. The Samsung also has wider viewing angles, but the TCL has a better contrast ratio. The TCL is slightly better for watching HDR movies because it gets much brighter, allowing it to make highlights pop in HDR.

Samsung The Frame 2021
43" 50" 55" 65" 75"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED and the Samsung The Frame 2021 are very similar, but the Q80T is better for most uses. The Q80T has wider viewing angles because it has the 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer. Its contrast isn't as good as the Frame 2021's, but it has a full-array local dimming feature to improve black level, which the Frame 2021 lacks. It has a better color gamut and volume to display a wider range of colors in HDR content, and it also gets brighter to make highlights pop. While both TVs have a 120Hz and HDMI 2.1 support, the Q80T has quicker response times.

Vizio P Series Quantum X 2020
65" 75" 85"

Overall, the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is a bit better than the Vizio P Series Quantum X 2020 for most uses. The Samsung has better reflection handling and wider viewing angles, so it's better for wider seating arrangements. It also has a faster response time and a lower input lag, so it's a better choice if you play video games. However, the Vizio has a higher contrast ratio, a much better HDR color gamut, and it gets a lot brighter in both SDR and HDR.

Samsung The Frame 2020
32" 43" 50" 55" 65" 75"

Overall, the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED performs better than the Samsung The Frame 2020. The Q80T has wider viewing angles due to its 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, but it also gives it a much lower contrast ratio than that of the Frame 2020, making blacks look a bit more grayish. The Q80T has significantly better reflection handling, much better color accuracy, and can get brighter in HDR. Also, the Q80T has local dimming, unlike the Frame 2020.

LG NANO99 8k 2020
65" 75"

The Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED is much better overall than the LG NANO99 8k 2020, but they have a few different features. The Samsung has a VA panel that results in a much better contrast ratio, so it can display deep blacks. It also gets brighter, has VRR support, a lower input lag, and much better reflection handling. However, the LG can display an 8k image and it has an IPS panel with a bit wider viewing angles, but the benefits of 8k are limited since there still isn't much native 8k content.

LG GX OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG GX OLED is better overall than the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED, but they have different panel types. The LG has an OLED panel, allowing it to individually turn off pixels, which results in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has a near-instant response time and wider viewing angles, great if you have a large seating area. However, the Samsung gets brighter, so it's a better choice for well-lit rooms, and it doesn't have permanent burn-in risk like OLEDs.

LG B9 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG B9 OLED is a better TV than the Samsung Q80T QLED. The LG is an OLED TV that can turn off each pixel individually, producing perfect blacks and delivering stunning picture quality, especially for watching movies in the dark. The LG also has a near-instantaneous response time and much better viewing angles. That said, the OLED panel on the LG also runs the risk of permanent burn-in, though this likely won't be an issue for most people who watch normal, varied content.

Samsung The Sero
43"

The Samsung The Sero and the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED are very different TVs, which makes them difficult to compare. The Q80T delivers better image quality, as it has a higher contrast ratio, full-array local dimming, and a much quicker response time. It also has a 120Hz refresh rate and VRR support for gaming. The Sero is an extremely niche product that's designed for viewing content in portrait mode. That said, its design allows for front-facing speakers that distort less at higher volumes.

Samsung The Terrace
55" 65" 75"

Although the Samsung The Terrace and the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED perform similarly overall, there are significant differences between the two TVs. The Terrace has a higher contrast ratio, and it gets a lot brighter to combat glare since it's meant to be used outdoors. The Q80T has faster response time and VRR support, making it a better option for gaming. The Q80T also has wider viewing angles thanks to the 'Ultra Viewing Angle' layer, and it has better reflection handling and is more accurate out-of-the-box.

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