LG CX OLED TV Review

Tested using Methodology v1.6
Updated Jul 23, 2021 at 11:54 am
LG CX OLED Picture
8.8
Mixed Usage
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
9.3
Movies
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
8.2
TV Shows
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung QN85A QLED
8.6
Sports
Value for price beaten by
: LG C1 OLED
9.3
Video Games
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
8.7
HDR Movies
Value for price beaten by
: Sony A8H OLED
9.0
HDR Gaming
Value for price beaten by
: LG G1 OLED
8.7
PC Monitor
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED
This TV was replaced by the LG C1 OLED
Type OLED
Sub-Type
WRGB
Resolution 4k

The LG CX OLED is an excellent high-end TV. It's part of LG's popular OLED lineup, sitting behind the LG GX OLED, and it delivers the same exceptional picture quality as other options. It can turn individual pixels off, which results in a near-infinite contrast ratio for perfect blacks, and there's no blooming around bright objects. It's packed with gaming features like variable refresh rate (VRR) support, HDMI 2.1 inputs, and a 120Hz panel with a near-instantaneous response time. It also performs well in bright environments as it has fantastic reflection handling, but its SDR brightness is just decent. Sadly, OLEDs have the risk of permanent burn-in, which can be caused by constant exposure to static elements, but we don't expect this to be an issue for most people. We also tested the 48 inch as a monitor, which you can read about here.

Our Verdict

8.8 Mixed Usage

The LG CX is excellent overall. It's fantastic for dark room viewing because it has a near-infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. Gaming is incredible thanks to the 120Hz panel, HDMI 2.1 inputs, and VRR supports. It has wide viewing angles, making it a great choice for watching TV shows and excellent for sports with a large group of people. It's also excellent for watching HDR content as it displays a wide color gamut, but it may not get bright enough to make highlights really pop.

Pros
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • VRR support.
  • Displays wide color gamut.
Cons
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • Only decent HDR peak brightness.
9.3 Movies

The LG CX OLED is fantastic for watching movies in a dark room. With its OLED screen, it can produce perfect blacks, which is amazing for watching movies in the dark. It upscales 1080p content well, it can remove judder from 24p sources like Blu-ray players, and has a near-instantaneous response time, but unfortunately, that makes some content appear to stutter.

Pros
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio.
  • Perfect black uniformity.
  • Removes 24p judder from any source.
Cons
  • Lower-frame rate content stutters.
8.2 TV Shows

The LG CX is great for watching TV shows in bright rooms. It has fantastic reflection handling, but it doesn't get bright enough to combat a ton of glare in well-lit rooms. It has wide viewing angles for when you want to watch your favorite show with the entire family. Also, it upscales 720p content without any issues. Unfortunately, like all OLED TVs, it has the risk of burn-in, which could be a problem with constant exposure to static logos.

Pros
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Upscales lower-resolution content well.
Cons
  • Doesn't get bright enough to combat glare.
8.6 Sports

The LG CX OLED is excellent for sports in well-lit rooms. It has fantastic reflection handling, but its peak brightness is just decent. It also has wide viewing angles, great for watching the game with a group of friends. It has a near-instantaneous response time that makes fast-moving content look smooth, and there's no dirty screen effect in the center.

Pros
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Upscales lower-resolution content well.
  • Near-instantaneous response time.
Cons
  • Doesn't get bright enough to combat glare.
9.3 Video Games

The LG CX OLED is incredible for playing video games. The input lag is very low in Game Mode, it has a near-instantaneous response time, and it supports G-SYNC, FreeSync, and HDMI Forum VRR to reduce screen tearing. Unfortunately, static menus in video games could be a problem for an OLED TV, as it has a risk of permanent burn-in. Luckily, it's a great choice for dark room gaming since it can produce perfect blacks.

Pros
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio.
  • Near-instantaneous response time.
  • Low input lag.
  • VRR support.
Cons
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
8.7 HDR Movies

The LG CX is excellent for HDR movies. The LG CX OLED covers nearly all of the DCI P3 color space used in most HDR content and has good coverage of the wider Rec. 2020 color space. It can produce perfect blacks, remove judder from all sources, and has a near-instantaneous response time. Unfortunately, its HDR peak brightness is just decent, and some highlights may not pop as intended.

Pros
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio.
  • Perfect black uniformity.
  • Displays wide color gamut.
Cons
  • Only decent HDR peak brightness.
9.0 HDR Gaming

The LG CX OLED is fantastic for HDR gaming. It has a ton of gaming features like a low input lag, VRR support, and a very quick response time. Also, it displays a very wide color gamut in HDR and has a near-infinite contrast ratio. Unfortunately, its HDR peak brightness in Game Mode is only okay, and it can't display very bright colors either.

Pros
  • Near-infinite contrast ratio.
  • Low input lag.
  • VRR support.
  • Displays wide color gamut.
Cons
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • Only decent HDR peak brightness.
8.7 PC Monitor

The LG CX is excellent to use as a PC monitor. It has low input lag and a quick response time for a smooth and responsive desktop experience. Even though it doesn't get extremely bright, visibility shouldn't be an issue due to the fantastic reflection handling. Unfortunately, OLEDs have the risk of permanent burn-in, which can be caused by constant exposure to static elements.

Pros
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Fantastic reflection handling.
  • Near-instantaneous response time.
  • Low input lag.
Cons
  • Doesn't get bright enough to combat glare.
  • Risk of permanent burn-in.
  • 8.8 Mixed Usage
  • 9.3 Movies
  • 8.2 TV Shows
  • 8.6 Sports
  • 9.3 Video Games
  • 8.7 HDR Movies
  • 9.0 HDR Gaming
  • 8.7 PC Monitor
  1. Updated Jul 23, 2021: Updated review for accuracy and clarity.
  2. Updated Jun 22, 2021: Added the real content local dimming videos.
  3. Updated Jun 15, 2021: We retested the input lag and variable refresh rate (VRR) with the latest firmware.
  4. Updated May 18, 2021: We've retested the SDR Brightness with the latest firmware (version 3.21.16).
  5. Updated Mar 01, 2021: Converted to Test Bench 1.6.
  6. Updated Dec 08, 2020: Remeasured pre-calibration accuracy.
  7. Updated Nov 09, 2020: Updated review for accuracy and clarity.
  8. Updated Nov 03, 2020: We retested the TV with an HDMI 2.1 source.
  9. Updated Aug 18, 2020: 1440p is only supported with a custom resolution, it's not natively supported.
  10. Updated Aug 06, 2020: Updated input lag results.
  11. Updated Jul 08, 2020: FreeSync support has been added in the latest firmware update (version 03.10.20).
  12. Updated Jun 30, 2020: CalMAN has confirmed that the LG CX now supports auto-calibration.
  13. Updated Jun 25, 2020: We incorrectly listed this TV as flicker-free, but it's not.
  14. Updated Jun 03, 2020: We retested 24p judder with different BFI settings, and have updated the results below.
  15. Updated May 26, 2020: We discovered an issue with the computer we were using to test input lag, so we retested it with a different PC. The new PC's results have been validated, and we've updated the numbers in the review below.
  16. Updated May 21, 2020: Converted to Test Bench 1.5.

Video

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Market Context
Market Context
Market Context

The LG CX OLED is a high-end TV in LG's 2020 OLED lineup. It's a direct replacement to the LG C9 OLED and sits between the LG BX OLED and LG GX OLED. Since there aren't many OLED TVs on the market, its main competitors are other LG TVs, the Sony A8H OLED, and the Vizio OLED 2020. Its LED competitors are the Samsung Q90/Q90T QLED and the Vizio P Series Quantum X 2020.

Design
Design
Style
Curved No

The LG CX has a sleek design with a premium feel to it, and it looks very similar to the LG C9 OLED. The silver metal on the back is a bit darker than its predecessor, but it has the same stand that allows the TV to sit close to the table.

Design
Stand

The stand is very solid, and the TV doesn't wobble all that much. It's almost as wide as the TV, so you need a big table to place it on. Also, since the TV sits so low to the table, placing a soundbar in front of it could potentially obstruct the screen.

Footprint of the 55 inch TV stand: 36" x 9.6".

Design
Back
Wall Mount VESA 300x200

The back is identical to the LG C9 OLED. The top part that holds the panel is solid metal, and the bottom part that holds the inputs is textured plastic. There are both side-facing and back-facing inputs, and there's a plastic cover on the stand for cable management. If you plan on wall-mounting it and want a similar TV with a dedicated wall mount, check out the LG GX OLED.

Design
Borders
Borders 0.35" (0.9 cm)
Design
Thickness
Max Thickness 1.93" (4.9 cm)

The panel itself is very thin, but it gets thicker on the bottom half where the inputs are.

9.0
Design
Build Quality

The LG CX has fantastic build quality. The front of the stand and the top half of the back are made out of metal, but there's a bit of flex on the top half of the TV. The back of the stand and the panel holding the inputs are made out of solid plastic that feels like metal.

Picture Quality
10
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
Inf : 1
Contrast with local dimming
N/A

Like all OLED TVs, the LG CX has a near-infinite contrast ratio since it can turn off individual pixels, resulting in perfect blacks.

7.0
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene Peak Brightness
321 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
459 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
456 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
414 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
340 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
176 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
439 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
435 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
395 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
324 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
146 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.069

Update 05/18/2021: We've retested the TV with the latest firmware (version 3.21.16). It seems like there's a way to minimize the ABL, and also limit how much the screen dims after a few minutes of displaying the image. Using a service remote, you can access a hidden menu by pressing on 'Start' and '0413'. Go to the OLED tab and disable 'TCP' and 'GSR'. This disables the dimming that happens over time when a static image is displayed. From our tests, we only saw a 5 cd/m² dip in brightness. In PC mode, leaving Game Peak Brightness disabled seems to result in less brightness variation. We measured between 243 cd/m² and 252 cd/m² in all windows, except the 100% windows, which we measure at 176 cd/m². In the 'Expert Dark' Picture Mode with Peak Brightness set to 'High', the 2% windows reach 441 cd/m², and it gets dimmer as the window size increases, with the 100% peak and sustained windows at 197 cd/m².

The LG CX has decent SDR peak brightness, but it may not be enough to combat glare from direct sunlight. It has an Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL) that significantly dims the screen when large areas get bright, so that's why the 100% window is significantly less bright.

Like the LG C9 OLED, the LG CX has a Peak Brightness setting, which changes the way the ABL performs. With this setting turned off, most scenes are between 294 to 308 cd/m², with 166 cd/m² in the 100% window. Turning this setting to 'High', which is what we tested with, makes most scenes brighter, but large areas are less bright, so the ABL is more aggressive.

The measurements were taken post-calibration in the 'Expert (Dark Room)' Picture Mode, with OLED Light to '100' and Peak Brightness to 'High.' Before calibration, the TV was slightly less bright.

If you don't care about image accuracy and want the brightest image possible, we got 480 cd/m² in the 2% window in the 'Expert (Dark Room)' Picture Mode with Dynamic Contrast set to 'Medium', Peak Brightness on 'High', and OLED Light and Contrast at their max.

If you often watch in a bright room or take the TV outside to watch a game, the Samsung The Terrace can get much brighter to combat glare.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

Update 06/22/2021: Added the real content local dimming videos.

Since the LG CX doesn't have a backlight, it doesn't have a local dimming feature. It can dim pixels individually, so bright objects and subtitles are displayed perfectly, with no visible blooming.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming In Game Mode
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

Update 06/22/2021: Added the real content local dimming videos.

Since it's an OLED that doesn't require a local dimming feature, there's perfect blacks and no blooming in Game Mode too.

7.1
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
Real Scene Highlight
681 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
760 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
817 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
465 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
311 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
152 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
720 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
776 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
443 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
293 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
146 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.101

The HDR peak brightness is decent. It's not extremely bright in HDR, which is typical of OLEDs, but it's still brighter than some OLEDs like the LG BX OLED. It gets brightest with small highlights and quickly loses its brightness with larger areas due to the aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL). EOTF follows the target curve perfectly until the sharp roll off, so it displays scenes at their correct brightness.

We measured the HDR brightness in the 'Cinema HDR' Picture Mode with OLED Light at its max, Peak Brightness on 'High', and Color Temperature set to 'Warm 2'.

If you find it too dim and want an even brighter image, then set Dynamic Tone Mapping on 'Medium', as you can see in this EOTF. Dynamic Tone Mapping can help make the image brighter, but it changes depending on the scene, so it actually lowered the brightness in our testing.

6.7
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness In Game Mode
Real Scene Highlight
563 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
749 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
804 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
457 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
320 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
152 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
633 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
768 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
433 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
302 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
147 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.096

The HDR brightness in Game Mode is okay. The real scene brightness is less than outside of Game Mode, but small highlights appear to be brighter when you're watching it. Once again, it has an aggressive ABL, so large areas of bright colors are more dim than the rest. Also, the EOTF looks nearly the same as outside of Game Mode.

We measured it in the 'Game' Picture Mode with OLED Light and Contrast at their max, Color Temperature set to 'Warm 2', and everything else at their default settings; the Peak Brightness setting isn't available in Game Mode.

8.4
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
1.526%
50% DSE
0.135%
5% Std. Dev.
0.401%
5% DSE
0.106%

The LG OLED55CXPUA has impressive gray uniformity, but this may vary between units. There's very little dirty screen effect in the center, which is great for sports fans. Uniformity is improved in near-dark scenes, but like other OLED TVs, there are some faint vertical and horizontal lines that could be visible in near-dark scenes in very dark rooms.

10
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
0.416%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

Since this OLED TV can turn off individual pixels, the black uniformity is perfect.

8.4
Picture Quality
Viewing Angle
Color Washout
48°
Color Shift
32°
Brightness Loss
62°
Black Level Raise
70°
Gamma Shift
57°

The LG CX has great viewing angles, and the image remains accurate when viewing from the side, which is great for a wide seating area.

9.3
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Glossy
Total Reflections
1.5%
Indirect Reflections
0.4%
Calculated Direct Reflections
1.1%

Just like the LG C9 OLED, the LG CX has fantastic reflection handling. You shouldn't have any issues placing this in a bright room, but avoid placing it opposite a window with direct sunlight because sunlight can damage the OLED pixels.

8.2
Picture Quality
Pre Calibration
White Balance dE
2.47
Color dE
1.77
Gamma
2.19
Color Temperature
7,034 K
Picture Mode
Expert (Dark Room)
Color Temp Setting
Warm 2
Gamma Setting
2.2

Update 12/08/2020: We remeasured the accuracy after calibrating our spectroradiometer. The review has been updated.

The LG OLED55CXPUA has great out-of-the-box color accuracy, but this may vary between units. Most colors are slightly inaccurate, and the white balance is a bit off, but it's hard to notice. The color temperature is colder than the 6500K target, so colors have a blue tint to them. Overall, the gamma follows the target fairly well, but some bright scenes are too bright.

9.6
Picture Quality
Post Calibration
White Balance dE
0.16
Color dE
1.00
Gamma
2.20
Color Temperature
6,512 K
White Balance Calibration
22 point
Color Calibration
Yes

After calibration, the color accuracy is nearly perfect. Any color or white balance inaccuracies aren't visible without the aid of a colorimeter.

You can see our recommended settings here.

8.0
Picture Quality
480p Input

This TV upscales 480p content well, with no obvious upscaling artifacts.

8.0
Picture Quality
720p Input

The LG CX upscales 720p content, like from cable boxes, well with no upscaling artifacts that we noticed on past OLED TVs.

9.0
Picture Quality
1080p Input

1080p content looks almost as good as native 4k content.

10
Picture Quality
4k Input

There aren't any issues displaying 4k content.

0
Picture Quality
8k Input

The LG CX is a 4k TV and doesn't support an 8k signal.

Picture Quality
Pixels

With an RGBW pixel structure, the LG OLED55CXPUA uses four sub-pixels, but all four are never used at the same time. This image shows the red, white, and blue sub-pixels. You can see the green sub-pixel in our alternative pixel photo.

8.6
Picture Quality
Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI P3 xy
97.32%
DCI P3 uv
98.71%
Rec 2020 xy
71.67%
Rec 2020 uv
75.65%

The LG CX displays a wide color gamut for HDR content. It has near-perfect coverage of the commonly-used DCI P3 color space that's used in most content. It also has decent coverage of the wider Rec. 2020 color space, which is used in less content.

7.1
Picture Quality
Color Volume
Normalized DCI P3 Coverage ITP
80.6%
10,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage ITP
44.2%
Normalized Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
61.0%
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
33.5%

Despite having an excellent color gamut, the LG CX's color volume is only decent. It can't produce extremely bright colors, but with an infinite contrast ratio, it can display dark, saturated colors.

8.6
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit
Red (Std. Dev.)
0.083
Green (Std. Dev.)
0.105
Blue (Std. Dev.)
0.092
Gray (Std. Dev.)
0.081

Excellent gradient handling, but there's still some banding in most colors. Enabling the Smooth Gradation feature doesn't affect the test pattern but can help reduce banding in real content. However, enabling this feature can cause some loss in details.

10
Picture Quality
Temporary Image Retention
IR after 0 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 2 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 4 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 6 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 8 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 10 min recovery
0.00%

The LG CX doesn't show any signs of temporary image retention, but this may vary between individual units.

This test is only indicative of short-term image retention and not the permanent burn-in that may occur with longer exposure to static images. We're currently running a long-term test to help us better understand permanent burn-in. You can see our results and read more about our investigation here.

2.0
Picture Quality
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Yes

Unfortunately, like most OLED TVs, the LG CX isn't immune to permanent burn-in. However, we don't expect people who watch varied content to have any issues, but rather it's a problem if there are constant static displays, like if it's used as a PC monitor.

This TV has three features to help burn-in risk. Enabling Screen Shift option, and setting Logo Luminance Adjustment to 'Low' may help with this. There's also an Pixel Refresher that can be run manually if needed.

You can read about our investigation into this here.

If you're concerned about burn-in and you prefer an LED TV, check out the Samsung Q90/Q90T QLED.

Motion
9.9
Motion
Response Time
80% Response Time
0.3 ms
100% Response Time
1.7 ms

The LG CX has a near-instantaneous response time, but you may still notice some motion blur. With the refresh rate at 120Hz, motion blur is noticeable in most content, as you can see here.

10
Motion
Flicker-Free
Flicker-Free
No
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

Update 06/25/2020: We incorrectly stated that this TV was flicker-free, it's not. Although the flicker isn't at all noticeable, there is a slight dip in brightness every 8ms.

The LG CX OLED technically isn't flicker-free because there's a slight dip in brightness every 8ms, which coincides with its refresh rate, but isn't noticeable.

10
Motion
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Optional BFI
Yes
Min Flicker For 60 fps
60 Hz
60Hz For 60 fps
Yes
120Hz For 120 fps
Yes
Min Flicker for 60 fps in Game Mode
60 Hz

Update 05/26/2020: 120Hz BFI only works properly in Game Mode. Since BFI isn't available when G-SYNC is enabled, to display a 4k @ 120Hz signal with BFI, you have to disable VRR from the source and manually enter Game Mode. In any other picture mode, 4k @ 120Hz signals skip frames, causing duplications when BFI is enabled.

This TV has a black frame insertion (BFI) feature to improve the appearance of motion. However, there are some issues with 120Hz BFI, as it causes some artifacts. You can't really see them in this photo though.

Motion
Motion Interpolation
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
Yes
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
Yes

The LG CX can interpolate lower-frame rate content up to 120fps, which causes the 'Soap Opera Effect'. It works well, and for some reason, 30fps content looks better than 60fps, but it's not very noticeable in real content. You'll notice any difference only if you really look for it.

4.8
Motion
Stutter
Frame Hold Time @ 24 fps
39.9 ms
Frame Hold Time @ 60 fps
14.9 ms

Since the LG CX Series has such a fast response time, lower-frame rate content can appear to stutter as each frame is held on for longer. This can be noticeable during panning shots.

10
Motion
24p Judder
Judder-Free 24p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60i
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via Native Apps
Yes

Update 06/03/2020: We retested 24p judder with different BFI settings and found that the LG CX can playback 24p content without judder, with BFI enabled, but only with certain BFI settings.

This TV can remove judder from all sources, like Blu-ray players or native apps. When watching 24p content (like movies) with BFI enabled, the LG CX can still play them without judder, but only if BFI is set to 'Low', 'Medium', or 'Auto'. 60p content can also be played with BFI, without judder, but only when BFI is set to either 'Auto', or 'Medium'.

9.4
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
120 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
HDMI Forum VRR
Yes
FreeSync
Yes
G-SYNC Compatible
Yes (NVIDIA Certified)
4k VRR Maximum
120 Hz
4k VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
1080p VRR Maximum
120 Hz
1080p VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
1440p VRR Maximum
120 Hz
1440p VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors
HDMI

Update 06/15/2021: We updated the TV to the latest firmware and retested VRR. Low framerate compensation is now working properly, and G-SYNC works properly even if the framerate drops below 20Hz.

Update 08/19/2020: We confirmed that it supports HDMI Forum's VRR. With the Xbox One S connected, we disabled the FreeSync setting and enabled the G-SYNC setting on the TV. The Xbox showed VRR as still working, meaning it was working with HDMI Forum VRR.

Update 07/08/2020: Support for FreeSync has been added in the latest firmware update (version 03.10.20).

The LG CX OLED has a 120Hz refresh rate, it supports HDMI Forum's VRR to reduce screen tearing, and it's G-SYNC compatible with newer NVIDIA graphics cards.

Inputs
9.5
Inputs
Input Lag
1080p @ 60Hz
13.6 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
97.0 ms
1440p @ 60Hz
13.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz
13.6 ms
4k @ 60Hz + 10-Bit HDR
13.5 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
13.6 ms
4k @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
97.0 ms
4k @ 60Hz With Interpolation
92.9 ms
8k @ 60Hz
N/A
1080p @ 120Hz
6.9 ms
1440p @ 120Hz
6.9 ms
4k @ 120Hz
6.7 ms
1080p with Variable Refresh Rate
5.9 ms
1440p with VRR
6.2 ms
4k with VRR
5.9 ms
8k with VRR
N/A

Update 06/15/2021: We retested the input lag with the latest firmware. The 4k @ 120Hz input lag is much lower, and much closer to the LG C1 OLED. We retested the other formats as well, but there were no other significant changes.

Update 11/03/2020: We retested the input lag with an HDMI 2.1 source, including 4k @ 120Hz.

Update 08/06/2020: Numbers for input lag reduced by 0.5ms to compensate for delay with the computer.

Update 05/26/2020: Input lag was retested with our "RTX 2070 Super" computer because the laptop had an issue with it. The numbers are all updated, though most haven't changed by any significant margin (0.1-0.5ms).

The LG CX Series has really low input lag in Game Mode, and it stays low with VRR enabled, which is great for gaming. It also stays low with a 4k resolution, which makes it a good choice for Xbox One X or PS4 Pro owners.

9.6
Inputs
Supported Resolutions
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes (forced resolution required)
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
4k @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
8k @ 30Hz or 24Hz
No
8k @ 60Hz
No

Update 11/03/2020: We retested it with an HDMI 2.1 source.

Update 09/21/2020: According to other owners, the LG CX can't display 4:4:4 properly when sent a 4k @ 120Hz signal from an RTX 3080 over HDMI 2.1. However, we were able to confirm it displays chroma 4:4:4 at that resolution.

Update 08/18/2020: 1440p @ 60Hz is only available when forced through a custom resolution; it's not natively supported.

Update 05/24/2020: 4k @ 120Hz is only displayed properly in Game Mode. Outside of Game Mode, it skips frames.

Like the LG C9 OLED, the LG CX displays all common resolutions. For it to display proper chroma 4:4:4 at 4k @ 120Hz and any resolution at 60Hz, which is important for reading text, it must be in 'PC' mode. However, 4:4:4 doesn't work on 1080p @ 120Hz. For full bandwidth signals, enable HDMI Ultra HD Deep Color.

Inputs
Advanced Console Compatibility
Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM)
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 120Hz + HDR
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 120Hz
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Yes
PS5, 1440p @ 120Hz
PS5 can't do 1440p
PS5, 1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
PS5, Variable Refresh Rate
PS5 can't do VRR yet
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 120Hz + HDR
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Yes
Xbox Series X, 1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, 1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, Variable Refresh Rate
Yes

Thanks to the HDMI 2.1 inputs, it supports 4k gaming up to 120Hz from either the Xbox Series X or PS5. It has an Auto Low Latency Mode that automatically switches the TV into Game Mode when you launch a game from a compatible device. When Dolby Vision is enabled, you're limited to 4k up to 60fps games and FreeSync doesn't work, but HDMI Forum VRR still works. However, this issue was fixed with a firmware update with the LG G1 OLED, and an update has yet to be released for the CX; we'll retest the TV once it's available.

Inputs
Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Yes
HDR10+
No
Dolby Vision
Yes
HLG
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
HDMI 2.1 Class Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
CEC Yes
HDCP 2.2 Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
USB 3.0
No
Variable Analog Audio Out Yes
Wi-Fi Support Yes (2.4 GHz, 5 GHz)

Update 11/03/2020: We retested it with an HDMI 2.1 source. We confirmed all HDMI inputs support HDMI 2.1.

The LG CX doesn't support full-bandwidth HDMI 2.1. It only has 40Gbps ports capable of 4k @ 120Hz @ 4:4:4 10-bit instead of 48Gbps ports, which could reach 12-bit, but we don't expect this to make any noticeable difference.

Inputs
Input Photos
Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI 4
USB 3
Digital Optical Audio Out 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm 1
Analog Audio Out RCA 0
Component In 0
Composite In 1 (incl. adapter)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) 1
Ethernet 1
DisplayPort 0
IR In 0
SD/SDHC 0
Inputs
Audio Passthrough
ARC
Yes (HDMI 2)
eARC support
Yes
Dolby Atmos via TrueHD via eARC
Yes
DTS:X via DTS-HD MA via eARC
No
5.1 Dolby Digital via ARC
Yes
5.1 DTS via ARC
No
5.1 Dolby Digital via Optical
Yes
5.1 DTS via Optical
No

The LG CX supports eARC when connected to a compatible receiver, so it can send high-quality audio like Dolby Atmos via TrueHD to an external receiver. Unfortunately, LG has dropped DTS decoding from their 2020 TVs.

Sound Quality
7.6
Sound Quality
Frequency Response
Low-Frequency Extension
63.50 Hz
Std. Dev. @ 70
2.12 dB
Std. Dev. @ 80
2.12 dB
Std. Dev. @ Max
5.18 dB
Max
91.2 dB SPL
Dynamic Range Compression
5.62 dB

The speakers have a good frequency response. Its bass is better than the LG C9 OLED. It still can't produce any rumble or thump, but it has some punch to it. It can get fairly loud, and it's well-balanced overall, so it can produce clear dialogue.

7.0
Sound Quality
Distortion
Weighted THD @ 80
0.085
Weighted THD @ Max
0.519
IMD @ 80
2.00%
IMD @ Max
10.89%

This TV has decent distortion performance. It doesn't have much audible distortion at moderate listening levels but gets more noticeable at its max volume. However, not everyone may hear this, and it depends on the content.

Smart Features
8.5
Smart Features
Interface
Smart OS WebOS
Version 5.0
Ease of Use
Easy
Smoothness
Average
Time Taken to Select YouTube
2 s
Time Taken to Change Backlight
7 s
Advanced Options
Many

The WebOS interface is smooth and easy to use. There weren't any bugs during testing, and apps didn't hang when launching as they did on the LG C9 OLED.

0
Smart Features
Ad-Free
Ads
Yes
Opt-out
No
Suggested Content in Home
Yes
Opt-out of Suggested Content
No

The TV isn't ad-free as we did occasionally see them during testing, but we couldn't take a picture. They aren't always there either.

8.0
Smart Features
Apps and Features
App Selection
Great
App Smoothness
Average
Cast Capable
Yes
USB Drive Playback
Yes
USB Drive HDR Playback
Yes
HDR in Netflix
Yes
HDR in YouTube
Yes

The app store has a ton of apps available and you can cast content from your device too.

9.0
Smart Features
Remote
Size
Large
Voice Control
Many Features
CEC Menu Control
Yes
Other Smart Features
Yes
Remote App LG TV Plus

This TV uses the same LG Magic Remote as other high-end LG TVs. You can use it like a traditional remote or point and press, and the pointer is smooth. It has shortcut buttons to popular streaming platforms like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. It has built-in voice control that allows you to change inputs, search for content, or ask for the weather. Also, you can use the remote for other devices, even if they don't support CEC.

Smart Features
TV Controls

There's a single button underneath the center of the screen. It allows you to turn the TV On/Off, change inputs, volume, and channels.

Smart Features
In The Box

  • User manual
  • Remote
  • Composite breakout adapter
  • Batteries
  • Not shown: Power cable and panel covers for cable management

Smart Features
Misc
Power Consumption 75 W
Power Consumption (Max) 178 W
Firmware 03.00.45

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 55 inch CX (OLED55CXPUA) and we expect our results to be valid for the 65 inch (OLED65CXPUA), and 77 inch (OLED77CXPUA) models too.

We've also tested the 48CX (OLED48CXPUB) as a monitor. Note that as there are some significant differences between our TV and Monitor test methodology and scoring, many of the results aren't directly comparable between the two.

Size Short Model Code US Model EU Model Notes
48" OLED48CX OLED48CXPUB OLED48CX6LB  
55" OLED55CX OLED55CXPUA OLED55CX6LA  
65" OLED65CX OLED65CXPUA OLED65CX6LA  
77" OLED77CX OLED77CXPUA OLED77CX6LA  

If someone comes across a different type of panel or if their LG CX OLED doesn't correspond to our review, let us know and we'll update the review. Note that some tests like the gray uniformity may vary between individual units.

The LG CX we reviewed was manufactured in February 2020, and you can see the label here.

Compared To Other TVs

Comparison picture

The LG CX OLED is an excellent all-around TV and one of the best on the market. It performs similarly to any other OLED TV with good gaming features and has better dark room performance than any LED TV.

See our recommendations for the best TVs, the best OLED TVs, and the best movie TVs.

LG C1 OLED
48" 55" 65" 77" 83"

The LG C1 OLED replaces the LG CX OLED, and overall they're very similar TVs. The biggest differences are that the C1 comes in a larger 83 inch variant, has the newest version of webOS, and includes new 'Game Optimizer' settings, including an input lag boost that reduces input lag by a few milliseconds. Our unit of the C1 has poor out-of-the-box color accuracy and lower brightness compared to the CX, but this could just be due to panel variation. All things considered, if none of the minor additions are essential to you, the CX may offer a slightly better value.

LG GX OLED
55" 65" 77"

In terms of picture quality, the LG GX OLED and the LG CX OLED are two very similar TVs and any differences come down to panel variance. Our unit of the CX has much better color accuracy, better gradient handling, and it gets slightly brighter. However, our unit of the GX has wider viewing angles. The major difference between them is that the GX comes with a wall mount that makes it sit flush against a wall, while the CX comes with a stand.

Sony A8H OLED
55" 65"

The Sony A8H OLED and the LG CX OLED are almost identical in performance. The Sony delivers slightly better picture quality, as it has better gradient handling and a much better color volume. On the other hand, the LG is a better choice for gaming, as it has a lower input lag, and it supports advanced gaming features like VRR and 'Auto Low Latency Mode'.

LG A1 OLED
48" 55" 65" 77"

The LG CX OLED and the LG A1 OLED deliver nearly identical picture quality, but the CX offers better gaming features. The CX has 4 HDMI 2.1 ports, and it supports more advanced gaming features like variable refresh rate technology (VRR). The CX is also a bit better for movie watching, as it can remove judder from any source, and it has an optional black frame insertion feature to reduce persistence blur. 

Sony A80J OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG CX OLED and the Sony A80J OLED are top-of-the-class OLED TVs with near-infinite contrast ratios and premium features. That said, the LG may be a better choice for gamers since it has more HDMI 2.1 ports and supports VRR to reduce screen tearing, while VRR hasn't yet been implemented on the A80J. The LG also gets a bit brighter overall.

LG C9 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG CX OLED and its predecessor, the LG C9 OLED, are two very similar-performing TVs. The C9 has better gray uniformity and viewing angles, but that could be due to panel differences. The CX has better built-in speakers and the black frame insertion works at 120Hz, but it causes some duplication in motion. Overall, they're two excellent TVs that should please most people.

Sony A9G OLED
55" 65" 77"

The Sony A9G OLED and the LG CX OLED each have similar picture quality thanks to their OLED panels. They each have an infinite contrast ratio, perfect black uniformity, and wide viewing angles. However, the CX is much better for gaming because it has VRR support and a much lower input lag.

Sony X90J
50" 55" 65" 75"

The Sony X90J and the LG CX OLED are very different TVs. The Sony uses a VA panel, while the LG uses OLED, so even though they're both well-suited for dark rooms, the LG can display deeper blacks because it can turn off individual pixels. If you tend to watch TV in a well-lit room, the Sony is a better choice because it gets a lot brighter to combat glare. That said, the LG has significantly better reflection handling. It also has wider viewing angles so that the image doesn't look washed out when viewed from the side. The LG has faster response times, but it also stutters more in low frame rate content like movies. It has more HDMI 2.1 ports, and its VRR support is already available, whereas the Sony's isn't.

Sony A90J OLED
55" 65" 83"

The Sony A90J OLED and the LG CX OLED perform very similarly overall. Like all OLEDs, the perfect blacks and near-instantaneous response times on both deliver exceptional picture quality and performance. The biggest differences are in design and features. The Sony feels a little bit more premium overall, but the LG comes with VRR support and four HDMI 2.1 ports, as opposed to the two on the Sony. All in all, they're both amazing TVs.

Samsung QN90A QLED
50" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED and the Samsung QN90A QLED are both excellent TVs, but they use different panel types. The LG uses an OLED panel that can turn individual pixels off, resulting in perfect black levels. It also has wider viewing angles and a near-instantaneous response time. However, the Samsung uses an LCD panel with Mini LED as backlighting, so it's much brighter, allowing it to make highlights pop in HDR. They both have a 120Hz panel with HDMI 2.1 support for gaming, but the Samsung has one HDMI 2.1 input, while the LG has four.

Sony A9S OLED
48"

The LG CX OLED and the Sony A9S OLED are very much alike, but the LG is a bit better, mainly due to its advanced gaming features. It can display a 4k @ 120Hz signal, and it has lower input lag and VRR support. The Sony's viewing angles are slightly wider, making it a better choice for wide seating areas. It has better gray uniformity as well; however, this varies between units.

Sony X900H
55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG CX OLED is better than the Sony X900H. The LG is an OLED TV that can produce perfect blacks, which the Sony can't. The LG has wider viewing angles, better reflection handling, and its near-instantaneous response time results in almost no motion blur. Also, the LG supports VRR to reduce screen tearing when gaming, although the Sony is expected to get it in a future firmware.

Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED
49" 50" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG CX OLED is better than the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED. The LG is able to produce perfect blacks, has wide viewing angles, and a near-instantaneous response time thanks to its OLED panel. The Samsung, however, can get brighter, and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in that comes with OLEDs. That said, burn-in shouldn't be an issue if you watch varied content.

Hisense U8G
55" 65"

The LG CX OLED and the Hisense U8G use different panel technologies, so which one is better depends on your usage. The LG's OLED panel delivers perfect blacks in a dark room, with no uniformity issues or blooming, and it has much better viewing angles. Unfortunately, OLED panels come with a risk of burn-in when exposed to static images. On the other hand, the Hisense is much brighter, and there's no risk of burn-in.

LG C8 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG C8 OLED and the LG CX OLED are very similar TVs. Their OLED panels allow them to individually turn off pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. Picture quality between each are similar, and the real differences are that the CX has HDMI 2.1 support, allowing it to support 4k @ 120Hz. It also has VRR support to reduce screen tearing, which the C8 doesn't have.

LG B9 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG CX OLED is a bit better than the LG B9 OLED. The CX can get brighter in HDR, it has much better out-of-the-box color accuracy, and its BFI features works at 120Hz. The B9 has slightly wider viewing angles and the gray uniformity is better, but this could be due to panel variances. 

Samsung Q800T 8k QLED
65" 75" 82"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the Samsung Q800T 8k QLED. The LG can display perfect blacks and it has very wide viewing angles. It also has a much faster response time, much better out-of-the-box color accuracy, and it handles reflections better. The Samsung is an 8k TV that gets brighter, has a lower input lag, and it doesn't have the burn-in risk associated with OLED TVs.

Samsung Q90/Q90T QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG CX OLED is a better TV for most uses than the Samsung Q90T QLED, though the Q90Tstill performs excellent overall. The LG has perfect blacks thanks to its OLED panel and has excellent viewing angles and better motion handling. It also has much better gray uniformity and has a wider color gamut with more accurate colors out-of-the-box. On the other hand, the Samsung can get quite a bit brighter and has lower input lag. The Samsung also doesn't run the risk of permanent image retention or burn-in, like the OLED panel on the LG does. This likely won't be an issue for most OLED owners who watch normal, varied content, but can be a concern if you watch a ton of static images.

Samsung QN85A QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung QN85A QLED and the LG CX OLED are very different TVs that use different panel technologies. The LG is an OLED with self-illuminating pixels, which results in an infinite contrast ratio and a near-instantaneous response time. The Samsung, on the other hand, has an IPS panel with a low native contrast ratio, and while it's improved by local dimming, there's still some noticeable blooming and IPS glow. While the Samsung has a lot to offer, with very high brightness levels that can make HDR content pop, it's simply hard to beat an OLED when it comes to picture quality.

LG BX OLED
55" 65"

The LG CX OLED is slightly better than the LG BX OLED. The CX gets brighter, handles gradients better, and comes with a sturdier, metal stand. However, the BX has slightly wider viewing angles, but this may vary between units. 

LG G1 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG G1 OLED and the LG CX OLED are two excellent TVs. They each have an OLED panel with a near-infinite contrast ratio and similar gaming features. The main difference is that the G1 has the new evo OLED panel, allowing small highlights to get brighter in HDR, but the CX still gets brighter in SDR. The GX has a unique design meant to sit flush against the wall with the dedicated wall-mount, while the CX comes with a stand. Other than that, there's very little difference between each TV, and they each deliver exceptional picture quality.

Samsung Q90/Q90R QLED
65" 75" 82"

The LG CX OLED is better than the Samsung Q90/Q90R QLED, but their differences come down to their panel differences. The LG is an OLED TV, so it's able to produce perfect blacks and it has a near-instantaneous response time. It also has wider viewing angles and better out-of-the-box color accuracy. The Samsung gets significantly brighter, it supports FreeSync VRR to reduce screen tearing, and it has slightly better reflection handling.

LG E9 OLED
55" 65"

The LG E9 OLED and the LG CX OLED are two similar TVs. The CX has better out-of-the-box color accuracy, while the E9 has better uniformity and viewing angles, but this could be due to panel differences. However, the E9 has a less-aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter, so there's less variation in brightness between different content.

Samsung Q900TS 8k QLED
65" 75" 85"

The Samsung Q900TS 8k QLED and the LG CX OLED are very different TVs that use different panel technologies and have different resolutions. While the Samsung supports 8k, there's still very little 8k content, so the LG offers better picture quality at a lower price. The LG can produce perfect blacks and has a near-instantaneous response time. Although there is a risk of permanent burn-in with the LG, it shouldn't be a problem if you watch varied content.

LG NANO90 2021
55" 65" 75" 86"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the LG NANO90 2021, mainly because they use different panel types. The CX has an OLED panel that displays perfect blacks, thanks to its near-infinite contrast ratio. Also, there's no blooming around bright objects. Each TV has the same gaming features with a 120Hz panel and HDMI 2.1 inputs, but the CX has a near-instantaneous response time for smooth motion. On the other hand, the NANO90 has an LED panel that doesn't have the permanent burn-in risk associated with OLEDs, and it gets brighter.

LG NANO85
49" 55" 65" 75"

The LG CX OLED is a much better TV than the LG NANO85. The CX is in the high-end of LG's lineup and it has all the features you expect in a premium TV. It's able to display perfect blacks, it has wide viewing angles, great out-of-the-box color accuracy, a very wide color gamut, and near-instantaneous response time. Since the NANO85 has a slower response time, lower frame rate content stutters less.

Vizio OLED 2020
55" 65"

The LG CX OLED is better than the Vizio OLED 2020. The LG gets brighter, has much better out-of-the-box color accuracy, much lower input lag, and it has FreeSync support. However, the Vizio has wider viewing angles and slightly better reflection handling.

LG NANO90 2020
55" 65" 75" 86"

The LG CX OLED is a significantly better TV than the LG NANO90 2020. The CX can individually turn off pixels, which produces extremely deep blacks and it has perfect black uniformity. This TV also has a near-instantaneous response time, wider viewing angles, better color accuracy, a wider color gamut, and better reflection handling. However, the NANO90 has less stutter due to its slower response time and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

TCL 6 Series/R635 2020 QLED
55" 65" 75"

The LG CX OLED performs much better than the TCL 6 Series/R635 2020. The LG uses an OLED panel that results in an infinite contrast ratio, perfect black uniformity, and wide viewing angles. It also has better reflection handling, color accuracy, and gradient handling. However, the TCL doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in and it gets much brighter.

Hisense H9G
55" 65"

The LG CX OLED is better overall than the Hisense H9G. The LG uses OLED technology to individually turn off pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio. It also has much wider viewing angles, better color accuracy, a wider color gamut, and more gaming features. However, the Hisense gets much brighter and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

Samsung QN900A 8k QLED
65" 75" 85"

The LG CX OLED is better overall than the Samsung QN900 8k QLED, although they use different panels. The Samsung has a VA panel, but its native contrast ratio is lower than typical, and it suffers from some distracting blooming. The LG, on the other hand, uses an OLED panel, so it has a near-infinite contrast ratio, resulting in deeper blacks with no visible blooming. While the LG can't display an 8k signal like the Samsung, there still isn't much 8k content.

Samsung Q70/Q70R QLED
49" 55" 65" 75" 82" 85"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the Samsung Q70/Q70R QLED. The LG can individually turn off its pixels, so it's able to produce perfect blacks. It also has much wider viewing angles, much better reflection handling, and it supports Dolby Vision. The Samsung can get much brighter, supports HDR10+, and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

Samsung Q80/Q80R QLED
55" 65" 75" 82"

The LG CX OLED is better than the Samsung Q80/Q80R QLED. The LG can individually turn off its pixels, so it's able to produce perfect blacks. It also has much wider viewing angles, a quicker response time, and better out-of-the-box color accuracy. The Samsung gets much brighter and it doesn't have permanent burn-in risk.

Samsung TU7000
43" 50" 55" 58" 65" 70" 75" 82"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the Samsung TU7000 thanks to its OLED panel. The LG delivers much better picture quality, as it can produce perfect blacks and can display a wide color gamut. It also has near-instantaneous response time, higher peak brightness, and wider viewing angles. That said, if you need a TV to use as a monitor, the Samsung has lower input lag, and its VA panel is immune to permanent burn-in.

LG NANO99 8k 2020
65" 75"

The LG CX OLED is much better overall than the LG NANO99 8k 2020. The CX can individually turn off pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has much wider viewing angles, better reflection handling, a near-instantaneous response time, and VRR support. However, the NANO99 displays an 8k image and doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in that OLEDs have.

LG NANO80 2020
49" 55" 65" 75"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the LG NANO80 2020. The LG has an OLED panel that individually turns off pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has gaming features like VRR support and a near-instantaneous response time. However, the LG NANO80 2020's LED panel doesn't have the risk of long-term burn-in associated with OLEDs.

Vizio P Series Quantum X 2020
65" 75" 85"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the Vizio P Series Quantum X 2020. The LG is an OLED and can produce perfect blacks, which the Vizio can't. The LG also has better reflection handling, faster response time, and better color accuracy out-of-the-box. The Vizio can get much brighter, though, making it a better choice for very bright rooms. Also, there's less stutter in lower frame rate content on the Vizio due to its slower response time.

Sony A8F OLED
55" 65"

The LG CX OLED is better than the Sony A8F OLED. Since both have OLED panels and can produce perfect blacks, both have similar overall picture quality. However, the LG can get brighter, it supports VRR technology to reduce screen tearing, and the input lag is low. On the other hand, the Sony has better viewing angles.

Hisense H8G
50" 55" 65" 75"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the Hisense H8G. The CX can individually turn off pixels, resulting in deep blacks and perfect black uniformity. It also has a near-instantaneous response time, better out-of-the-box color accuracy, wider viewing angles, significantly improved reflection handling, a wider color gamut, and it's packed with other features like a variable refresh rate technology. On the other hand, the Hisense gets brighter and it doesn't have the permanent burn-in risk associated with OLED TVs.

Sony X950G
55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG CX OLED is a better TV than the Sony X950G. Thanks to its OLED panel, the LG has perfect blacks, resulting in an exceptional movie-watching experience. It also has much better gray uniformity, significantly better viewing angles, a wider color gamut, and much better motion handling. On the other hand, the Sony has more accurate colors out-of-the-box and can get brighter with both SDR and HDR content. The Sony also doesn't run the risk of permanent image retention or burn-in, like the OLED panel on the LG does. Though this likely won't be an issue for most OLED owners who watch normal, varied content and is more likely to occur if you watch a ton of static images.

LG UN7300
43" 49" 50" 55" 65" 70" 75"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the LG UN7300. The CX is an OLED that can produce perfect blacks, it has near-instantaneous response time, and a 120Hz refresh rate with VRR support. It also has better color accuracy, higher peak brightness, and wider viewing angles. However, input lag is lower on the UN7300.

Samsung The Frame 2020
32" 43" 50" 55" 65" 75"

The LG CX OLED is a significantly better TV than the Samsung The Frame 2020. Being an OLED TV, the LG can produce perfect blacks, which the Frame 2020 can't do. The LG has a faster response time, wider viewing angles, and its reflection handling is much better too. It has better color accuracy as well; however, the Frame has a lower input lag and it gets brighter in SDR.

TCL 5 Series/S535 2020 QLED
50" 55" 65" 75"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the TCL 5 Series/S535 2020 QLED. The LG has an OLED panel, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also gets brighter, has wider viewing angles, a near-instantaneous response time, and VRR support. However, the TCL has lower input lag and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

LG NANO81
55" 65" 75"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the LG NANO81. The CX can individually turn off pixels, producing extremely deep blacks, and it has a perfect contrast ratio. This TV also gets brighter, has wider viewing angles, handles reflections better, and has a 120Hz refresh rate with VRR support. On the other side, the NANO81 has a lower input lag and doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

Samsung Q60/Q60R QLED
43" 49" 55" 65" 75" 82"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the Samsung Q60/Q60R QLED. The LG can individually turn off its pixels, so it's able to produce perfect blacks. It also has much wider viewing angles, much better reflection handling, and it displays a wider color gamut. The Samsung has better out-of-the-box color accuracy and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

Samsung QN800A 8k QLED
65" 75" 85"

The LG CX OLED is much better than the Samsung QN800A 8k QLED, but they have different panel types. The LG is a 4k TV with an OLED panel, allowing it to produce perfect blacks without blooming around bright objects. The LG also has wider viewing angles and a quicker response time. However, the Samsung's 8k LED panel gets significantly brighter, making it a better choice for HDR content.

LG UN8500
65" 75" 82" 86"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the LG UN8500. The CX can individually turn off pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has much wider viewing angles, FreeSync support, a near-instantaneous response time, and much better reflection handling. However, the UN8500 doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

Vizio P Series Quantum 2020
65" 75"

Overall, the LG CX OLED is much better than the Vizio P Series Quantum 2020. Although both TVs are well-suited for dark rooms, the LG's OLED panel can produce perfect blacks due to its emissive technology. Additionally, it has a faster response time, wider viewing angles, and better color accuracy. However, the Vizio is a better choice for well-lit rooms due to its higher peak brightness, and it also gets brighter in HDR to make highlights pop.

Samsung TU8300
55" 65"

The LG CX OLED is a significantly better TV than the Samsung TU8300. Due to its OLED panel, the LG has perfect blacks, providing a much better movie-watching experience in dark rooms. It also can get quite a bit brighter with HDR content, making it a much better choice if you watch a lot of movies or game in HDR. The LG also has much better black and gray uniformity, and way better viewing angles as well. On the other hand, the Samsung has a curved screen, which some people may prefer. The Samsung also uses an LCD panel, which doesn't run the risk of permanent burn-in like with OLEDs, though we don't expect this to be an issue for most people who watch varied content.

Vizio M7 Series Quantum 2020
50" 55" 65"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the Vizio M7 Series Quantum 2020; however, they're very different TVs. The LG is a high-end OLED that can produce perfect blacks, while the Vizio is a mid-range LCD TV with a VA panel. The LG has wider viewing angles, better reflection handling, and gets brighter. It also has a faster response time and better color accuracy out-of-the-box. However, the Vizio has lower input lag and doesn't stutter as much in lower frame rate content.

Hisense H6570G
43" 50" 55" 65" 70" 75" 85"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the Hisense H6570G. The LG has an OLED panel that delivers an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has a much quicker response time, lower input lag, VRR support, wide viewing angles, and it displays a wide color gamut for HDR content. However, the Hisense has less stutter in lower-frame rate content and doesn't have a permanent burn-in risk.

LG UN7000
43" 49" 50" 55" 60" 65" 70" 75"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the LG UN7000. The CX has an OLED panel that displays extremely deep blacks and it has perfect black uniformity. It also has much wider viewing angles, a wider color gamut, better reflection handling, FreeSync support, a near-instantaneous response time, and it displays 4k content properly. However, the UN7000 has lower input lag and it doesn't have the burn-in risk associated with OLED TVs.

Vizio M8 Series Quantum 2020
55" 65"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the Vizio M8 Series Quantum 2020. The LG has an OLED panel and can produce perfect blacks for a better dark room viewing experience. It also has faster response time, a 120Hz refresh rate, and VRR support. However, the Vizio gets brighter in SDR and has lower input lag.

Samsung RU8000
49" 55" 65" 75" 82"

The LG CX OLED is a much better TV than the Samsung RU8000. The LG is an OLED TV, so it's able to produce perfect blacks. The LG also has a significantly faster response time, wider viewing angles, and its out-of-the-box color accuracy is much better. In addition to its FreeSync support, the LG is compatible with NVIDIA's G-SYNC to reduce screen tearing when gaming. The main downside with the LG is that it's susceptible to permanent burn-in, which the Samsung is immune to. That said, burn-in shouldn't be an issue if you watch varied content.

Vizio V Series 2020
40" 43" 50" 55" 58" 60" 65" 70" 75"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the Vizio V Series 2020. The LG's OLED panel has an infinite contrast ratio to produce perfect blacks, and it has a near-instantaneous response time and a 120Hz refresh rate. It also has wider viewing angles, higher peak brightness, and much better reflection handling. However, the Vizio's slower response time causes less stutter in lower frame rate content, and its input lag is slightly lower.

Samsung The Terrace
55" 65" 75"

The LG CX OLED and the Samsung The Terrace are very different TVs. The LG's OLED technology makes it a better choice for dark rooms, as it can produce perfect blacks. On the other hand, the Samsung is a QLED TV that gets extremely bright and is designed for outdoor use. The LG has faster response time and VRR support; however, the Terrace has lower input lag.

Samsung The Sero
43"

The LG CX OLED is significantly better than the Samsung The Sero; however, they're very different TVs. The LG has an OLED panel that's better suited for dark rooms, while the Samsung has an IPS panel and is designed for watching content in portrait mode. The LG delivers much better picture quality, and it's better for gaming due to its faster response time, 120Hz refresh rate, and VRR support. However, the Samsung stutters less in lower frame content such as movies, and its IPS panel is immune to permanent burn-in.

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