LG GX OLED TV Review

Tested using Methodology v1.6
Reviewed Sep 17, 2020 at 08:12 am
LG GX OLED Picture
8.8
Mixed Usage
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
9.4
Movies
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
8.2
TV Shows
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung QN85A QLED
8.7
Sports
Value for price beaten by
: LG C1 OLED
9.2
Video Games
Value for price beaten by
: LG BX OLED
8.7
HDR Movies
Value for price beaten by
: LG G1 OLED
9.0
HDR Gaming
Value for price beaten by
: LG G1 OLED
8.8
PC Monitor
Value for price beaten by
: Samsung QN85A QLED
This TV was replaced by the LG G1 OLED
Type OLED
Sub-Type
WRGB
Resolution 4k

The LG GX is a new TV in LG's 2020 lineup with a unique 'Gallery' design. It's a very thin TV that comes with a wall-mount instead of a stand, and it's meant to sit flush against the wall. Picture quality is excellent; like any OLED, it can individually dim pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It displays a wide color gamut for HDR content, but it has an aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter, so large areas aren't bright. It has variable refresh rate (VRR) support, a near-instant response time, a Black Frame Insertion feature, and low input lag for gaming. Unfortunately, like any OLED, it has the risk of permanent burn-in, which can be an issue if you watch content with static elements all the time, like the news, but it shouldn't pose too much of a problem if you watch varied content. Lastly, it has wide viewing angles, which is great for wide seating arrangements.

NoteWe bought the optional stand with the TV for testing and didn't use the included wall-mount. We've read reports of people having a hard time setting up the TV, but this isn't something we test for. If you experience any issues, let us know in the discussions. If you don't plan on wall-mounting it, the LG CX OLED is a very similar TV that comes with a stand and costs less.

Our Verdict

8.8 Mixed Usage

The LG GX OLED is an amazing all-around TV. It's an ideal choice for watching movies in a dark room because of its nearly infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. Gamers should enjoy the 120Hz refresh rate, VRR support, near-instant response time, and low input lag. It also has wide viewing angles if you want to watch the big game in a wide seating arrangement. Unfortunately, it has the risk of permanent burn-in, so it's not ideal to use as a PC monitor because of the static elements of most user interfaces.

Pros
  • Nearly infinite contrast ratio.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Near-instant response time.
  • VRR support.
Cons
  • Aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).
  • Risk permanent burn-in.
9.4 Movies

The LG GX OLED is an incredible TV for watching movies. It has a nearly infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity, so movies in a dark room look amazing. It upscales lower-resolution content well, and it removes 24p judder from any source. Sadly, because this TV has a near-instant response time, lower frame rate content may appear to stutter.

Pros
  • Nearly infinite contrast ratio.
  • Perfect black uniformity.
  • Removes 24p judder.
  • Upscales 720p and 1080p content well.
Cons
  • Low frame rate content may appear to stutter.
8.2 TV Shows

Great for TV shows. The LG GX has very wide viewing angles, great if you walk around while watching your favorite show. It has outstanding reflection handling but may not get bright enough to combat glare in well-lit environments. It upscales lower-resolution content, such as from cable boxes, without any problems. Unfortunately, it has the risk of permanent burn-in, which may be an issue if you constantly watch content with static elements, like the news.

Pros
  • Upscales 720p and 1080p content well.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Outstanding reflection handling.
Cons
  • Aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).
  • Risk permanent burn-in.
8.7 Sports

The LG GX is excellent for watching sports. It has a near-instant response time, resulting in minimal motion blur, and it has wide viewing angles if you want to watch the game with a large group of friends. It performs well in bright rooms because it has outstanding reflection handling, but it doesn't get bright enough to combat a lot of glare. Our unit has a uniform screen with no dirty screen effect, but this may vary between units.

Pros
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Outstanding reflection handling.
  • Near-instant response time.
Cons
  • Aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).
9.2 Video Games

Outstanding for video games. The LG GX has a 120Hz refresh rate and VRR support to reduce screen tearing. Its response time is near-instant and it has a Black Frame Insertion feature. Input lag is also incredibly low. Also, it's amazing for dark-room gaming because of its nearly infinite contrast ratio. Sadly, it has the risk of permanent burn-in if you constantly play video games with an interface that has a lot of static elements, but we don't expect this to be an issue for most people.

Pros
  • Near-instant response time.
  • Low input lag.
  • VRR support.
Cons
  • Risk permanent burn-in.
8.7 HDR Movies

Excellent for HDR movies. The LG GX has an infinite contrast ratio, displaying extremely deep blacks, and it has perfect black uniformity. It displays a wide color gamut for HDR, but it may not get bright enough in HDR to truly bring out highlights. Lower frame rate content may appear to stutter because of its near-instant response time. However, it can remove 24p judder from any source.

Pros
  • Nearly infinite contrast ratio.
  • Perfect black uniformity.
  • Removes 24p judder.
  • Displays wide color gamut.
Cons
  • Aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).
  • Risk permanent burn-in.
9.0 HDR Gaming

The LG GX is excellent for HDR gaming. It's packed with gaming features like VRR support, near-instant response time, and low input lag. HDR content looks good because it displays a wide color gamut, but it doesn't get very bright in that mode to truly make highlights stand out. Due to this TV's nearly infinite contrast ratio, it displays perfect blacks, great for dark-room gaming.

Pros
  • Nearly infinite contrast ratio.
  • Near-instant response time.
  • Low input lag.
  • Displays wide color gamut.
Cons
  • Aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).
  • Risk permanent burn-in.
8.8 PC Monitor

The LG GX is an excellent choice to use as a PC monitor. It has wide viewing angles, low input lag, and near-instant response time. It also displays chroma 4:4:4, which is important for reading text. Sadly, it has the risk of permanent burn-in, so static elements from a computer's interface may damage the screen over time, but this shouldn't be a problem if you watch varied content.

Pros
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Outstanding reflection handling.
  • Low input lag.
Cons
  • Aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL).
  • Risk permanent burn-in.
  • 8.8 Mixed Usage
  • 9.4 Movies
  • 8.2 TV Shows
  • 8.7 Sports
  • 9.2 Video Games
  • 8.7 HDR Movies
  • 9.0 HDR Gaming
  • 8.8 PC Monitor
  1. Updated Sep 16, 2021: We corrected a mistake in the total inputs section.
  2. Updated Jul 26, 2021: We added two local dimming videos with real content, and rechecked Dolby Vision support on the Xbox Series X.
  3. Updated Mar 01, 2021: Converted to Test Bench 1.6.
  4. Updated Dec 08, 2020: Remeasured pre-calibration accuracy.
  5. Updated Nov 04, 2020: We've retested chroma 4:4:4 support and input lag at 4k @ 120Hz with an HDMI 2.1 source.
  6. Updated Sep 17, 2020: Review published.
  7. Updated Sep 10, 2020: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Market Context
Market Context
Market Context

The LG GX OLED is a high-end TV in LG's OLED lineup. It's a new TV in 2020 and it sits right below the LG WX, which is an even thinner TV that comes with an external box instead of having the inputs on the TV. Its main competitors are the LG CX OLED, the Sony A8H OLED, and the Samsung The Frame 2020.

Design
Design
Style
Curved No

The LG GX has an incredible design. It's very thin and the TV has a uniform thickness throughout. There are tapered edges where the front and back panels meet, which allows the TV to sit flush against the wall when wall-mounted, making it look like a picture frame. It comes with LG's Flush Wall Mount, and you can buy feet separately if you don't want to wall-mount it.

Design
Stand

LG sells feet you can buy separately for this stand, which is what we did, and they hold the TV well. If you don't plan on wall-mounting it, then consider the LG CX OLED, which is a very similar TV that's cheaper and it comes with a stand.

Footprint of the 55" stand: 45.4" x 10.7".

Note: If you buy the feet separately you also get input covers.

Design
Back
Wall Mount VESA 300x300

The back of this TV is made out of metal. In the photo, there's a cover where the dedicated wall-mount goes, and you can also VESA-mount it if you choose. There's an L-shaped panel covering the inputs and it allows you to route wires to the center of the TV if you wall-mount it. There's also cable management through the optional feet.

Note: The input covers come with the feet if you buy them separately.

Design
Borders
Borders 0.35" (0.9 cm)

The borders are thin and aren't distracting.

Design
Thickness
Max Thickness 0.94" (2.4 cm)

The LG GX is very thin and won't stick out when wall-mounted. It's even thinner than the Samsung The Frame 2020.

9.5
Design
Build Quality

Incredible build quality. The LG GX is extremely well-made with a unique design. The back is mainly made out of metal that doesn't flex much and there aren't any visible build quality issues.

Picture Quality
10
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
Inf : 1
Contrast with local dimming
N/A

Like all OLED TVs, the LG GX has an infinite contrast ratio since it can turn off individual pixels, resulting in perfect blacks.

6.7
Picture Quality
SDR Brightness
Real Scene Peak Brightness
292 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
388 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
393 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
358 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
301 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
177 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
369 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
373 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
340 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
287 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
168 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.051

The LG GX has okay peak brightness. It gets bright enough to combat glare in moderately-lit rooms, but it may not be good enough for a bright environment. Because of its aggressive Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL), its brightness isn't very consistent across different content and it quickly becomes dim with large, bright areas.

We measured peak brightness before calibration, although we normally take the results after calibration. This is because calibrating the TV significantly improved the 100% peak window up to 269 cd/m², while the other results only slightly improved by one or two nits. Since calibration changes per unit, not every TV would get brighter like ours, and some may get dimmer.

We measured the SDR peak brightness in the 'Expert (Dark Room)' Picture Mode with OLED Light at its max and Peak Brightness setting on 'High'. We got the brightest image possible with these settings, as seen in the 10% peak window test.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

Update 07/26/2021: We've added two new videos demonstrating the backlight behavior with real content.

Since this TV doesn't have a backlight, it doesn't have a local dimming feature. It can dim pixels individually, so bright objects and subtitles are displayed perfectly, with no visible blooming.

10
Picture Quality
Local Dimming In Game Mode
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
No Backlight

Update 07/26/2021: We've added two new videos demonstrating the backlight behavior with real content.

7.0
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness
Real Scene Highlight
662 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
746 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
744 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
432 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
285 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
139 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
711 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
712 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
409 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
270 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
133 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.104

Decent brightness in HDR. This TV gets bright enough to bring out small highlights in HDR. However, like in SDR, it quickly loses its brightness as large, bright areas cover the screen because of its aggressive ABL. If you want an OLED that gets a bit brighter in HDR, check out the Sony A90J OLED.

We measured HDR peak brightness in the 'HDR Cinema' Picture Mode with OLED Light at its max, Peak Brightness set to 'High', and Color Temperature set to 'Warm 2'.

If you want the brightest image possible, set the Picture Mode to 'HDR Vivid' with its default settings.

7.1
Picture Quality
HDR Brightness In Game Mode
Real Scene Highlight
666 cd/m²
Peak 2% Window
792 cd/m²
Peak 10% Window
788 cd/m²
Peak 25% Window
458 cd/m²
Peak 50% Window
319 cd/m²
Peak 100% Window
153 cd/m²
Sustained 2% Window
751 cd/m²
Sustained 10% Window
756 cd/m²
Sustained 25% Window
435 cd/m²
Sustained 50% Window
304 cd/m²
Sustained 100% Window
147 cd/m²
Automatic Brightness Limiting (ABL)
0.100
8.7
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
1.113%
50% DSE
0.134%
5% Std. Dev.
0.279%
5% DSE
0.064%

The LG GX has excellent gray uniformity. There's very minor dirty screen effect in the center, but it shouldn't be distracting during sports. However, like most OLED TVs, there are faint vertical and horizontal lines that may be visible in near-dark scenes.

Note: Gray uniformity may vary between units.

10
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
0.155%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

Since this OLED TV can turn off individual pixels, black uniformity is perfect.

9.0
Picture Quality
Viewing Angle
Color Washout
48°
Color Shift
34°
Brightness Loss
69°
Black Level Raise
70°
Gamma Shift
70°

The LG GX has outstanding wide viewing angles. The image remains accurate when viewing at an angle, so it's ideal for wide seating arrangements.

9.3
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Glossy
Total Reflections
1.5%
Indirect Reflections
0.1%
Calculated Direct Reflections
1.4%

Just like the LG CX OLED, the LG GX has outstanding reflection handling. You shouldn't have any issues placing this opposite a window.

7.4
Picture Quality
Pre Calibration
White Balance dE
3.87
Color dE
2.21
Gamma
2.17
Color Temperature
6,899 K
Picture Mode
Expert (Dark Room)
Color Temp Setting
Warm 2
Gamma Setting
2.2

Update 12/08/2020: We remeasured the accuracy after calibrating our spectroradiometer. The review has been updated.

Decent out-of-the-box color accuracy. Most colors are slightly inaccurate and white balance is off, which affects shades of gray. The color temperature is slightly cold and for the most part, gamma follows the target curve well, except extremely bright scenes may be too bright.

We had to calibrate the TV twice because we had difficulty calibrating the 5% and 10% gray stimulus levels while being connected to HDMI 1. We calibrated it again through HDMI 2, so these results are taken from HDMI 2. The color accuracy only slightly improved and you can see our original results from HDMI 1 here:

Note: Color accuracy may vary between units.

If you want a high-end TV with exceptional accuracy out of the box, check out the Samsung QN85A QLED.

9.4
Picture Quality
Post Calibration
White Balance dE
0.14
Color dE
1.53
Gamma
2.21
Color Temperature
6,508 K
White Balance Calibration
22 point
Color Calibration
Yes

After calibration, color accuracy is almost perfect. Any remaining inaccuracies are almost impossible to spot with the naked eye and the color temperature is extremely close to the 6500K target.

We originally calibrated the LG GX through HDMI 1. While trying to calibrate the 10% gray stimulus, it heavily affected the 5% gray stimulus to the point where the screen looked blue. This made it difficult to get a proper image post-calibration. We recalibrated it a second time on HDMI 2, and even though it slightly decreased the final score, it resulted in a better final image. You can see our original results here:

You can see our recommended settings here.

8.0
Picture Quality
480p Input

This TV upscales 480p content well, with no obvious upscaling artifacts.

8.0
Picture Quality
720p Input

The LG GX upscales 720p content, such as from cable boxes, without any issues.

9.0
Picture Quality
1080p Input

1080p content looks almost as good as native 4k content.

10
Picture Quality
4k Input

The LG GX displays 4k content without any issues. Even though it has an RGBW pixel structure, all four sub-pixels are never on at the same time, so there's no loss in color resolution.

0
Picture Quality
8k Input

The LG GX is a 4k TV that can't display an 8k signal.

Picture Quality
Pixels

The LG GX has an RGBW pixel structure, but all four pixels are never used at the same time. The image above shows the white, blue, and green subpixels. You can see alternate pixel pictures here: Photo 1 and Photo 2. This pixel structure isn't ideal for use as a PC monitor because it affects the way text is displayed.

8.5
Picture Quality
Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI P3 xy
96.27%
DCI P3 uv
98.00%
Rec 2020 xy
70.95%
Rec 2020 uv
75.21%

Excellent color gamut. This TV has near-perfect coverage of the DCI P3 color space used in most HDR content and decent coverage of the wider Rec. 2020 color space.

The EOTF follows the target curve fairly well until it rolls off at its peak brightness. The EOTF in 'Game' mode is almost the exact same.

If you find HDR too dim, enable Dynamic Tone Mapping and set Dynamic Contrast to 'Medium'. It resulted in a bit brighter image, as you can see in this EOTF.

7.0
Picture Quality
Color Volume
Normalized DCI P3 Coverage ITP
79.2%
10,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage ITP
42.9%
Normalized Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
60.6%
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
32.8%

Okay color volume. Thanks to its nearly infinite contrast ratio, it displays deep, saturated colors well. However, it struggles to display brighter colors.

7.9
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit
Red (Std. Dev.)
0.096
Green (Std. Dev.)
0.123
Blue (Std. Dev.)
0.099
Gray (Std. Dev.)
0.123

Good gradient handling, but it's not as good as the LG CX OLED. There's noticeable banding in grays and greens and a bit in reds and blues. Setting Smooth Gradation to 'High' helps smooths out gradients in real content, but it didn't affect the test pattern. Setting it to 'Medium' or 'Low' doesn't affect the gradients all that much. If you want an OLED TV with better gradient handling, check out the Sony A9S OLED.

10
Picture Quality
Temporary Image Retention
IR after 0 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 2 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 4 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 6 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 8 min recovery
0.00%
IR after 10 min recovery
0.00%

The LG GX doesn't have any temporary image retention, even after displaying a high-contrast static image for 10 minutes.

Note: Temporary image retention may vary between units.

2.0
Picture Quality
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Permanent Burn-In Risk
Yes

Unfortunately, like most OLED TVs, the LG GX isn't immune to permanent burn-in. However, we don't expect people who watch varied content to have any issues, but rather it's a problem if there are constant static displays, like if it's used as a PC monitor.

This TV has three features to help burn-in risk. Enabling Screen Shift option, and setting Logo Luminance Adjustment to 'Low' may help with this. There's also an Automatic Pixel Refresher that can be run manually if needed.

You can read about our investigation into this here.

If you're worried about burn-in and would prefer a high-end LED TV, check out the Samsung Q900TS 8k QLED.

Motion
9.8
Motion
Response Time
80% Response Time
0.2 ms
100% Response Time
2.3 ms

The LG GX has a near-instant response time. There's a bit of overshoot in dark transitions, which may lead to motion artifacts in dark scenes, but for the most part, motion looks very smooth.

10
Motion
Flicker-Free
Flicker-Free
No
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

There's a slight dip in brightness every 8 ms, which coincides with the 120Hz refresh rate and isn't noticeable.

10
Motion
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Optional BFI
Yes
Min Flicker For 60 fps
60 Hz
60Hz For 60 fps
Yes
120Hz For 120 fps
Yes
Min Flicker for 60 fps in Game Mode
60 Hz

The LG GX has a Black Frame Insertion feature that helps improve the appearance of motion. For it to flicker at 60Hz for 60fps content, set TruMotion to 'User' and OLED Motion to 'High'. It always flickers at 120Hz for 120fps content if you have TruMotion enabled with OLED Motion on any setting. The BFI feature doesn't look as good with 120fps content as it does with 60fps content (above photo) and the crosstalk is bad, so there may be some motion artifacts.

Motion
Motion Interpolation
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
Yes
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
Yes

The LG GX can interpolate lower frame rate content up to 120fps, which is known as the 'Soap Opera Effect'. It does a good job at smoothing out motion and it doesn't stop interpolating even in busy scenes, but this may lead to artifacts with fast-moving content. However, the artifacts are hard to notice and not too distracting.

See here for the settings that control the motion interpolation feature.

5.0
Motion
Stutter
Frame Hold Time @ 24 fps
39.4 ms
Frame Hold Time @ 60 fps
14.4 ms

Due to the TV's very quick response time, there's noticeable stutter with lower frame rate content because each frame is held on longer. Enabling the motion interpolation feature can help reduce this issue.

10
Motion
24p Judder
Judder-Free 24p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60p
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60i
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via Native Apps
Yes

The LG GX removes 24p judder from any source, as long as Real Cinema is enabled. It can remove judder from 24p content with OLED Motion set to 'Auto', 'Low', or 'Medium'. However, it doesn't remove judder with OLED Motion set to 'High' becauses the backlight flickers at 60Hz. With 60p content, you have to set OLED Motion on 'Medium' or 'Auto' because 'Low' doesn't remove judder completely.

7.9
Motion
Variable Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
120 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
HDMI Forum VRR
Yes
FreeSync
Yes
G-SYNC Compatible
Yes (NVIDIA Certified)
4k VRR Maximum
120 Hz
4k VRR Minimum
40 Hz
1080p VRR Maximum
120 Hz
1080p VRR Minimum
40 Hz
1440p VRR Maximum
120 Hz
1440p VRR Minimum
40 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors
HDMI

The LG GX supports variable refresh rate technologies to reduce screen tearing. With an Xbox One S connected to the TV, we disabled the FreeSync setting and enabled the G-SYNC setting. The Xbox showed VRR was still working, so we were able to confirm the TV supports HDR Forum VRR.

Find out more about the VRR settings here.

Inputs
9.5
Inputs
Input Lag
1080p @ 60Hz
13.6 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
97.1 ms
1440p @ 60Hz
13.5 ms
4k @ 60Hz
13.6 ms
4k @ 60Hz + 10-Bit HDR
13.6 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
13.6 ms
4k @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
97.0 ms
4k @ 60Hz With Interpolation
92.9 ms
8k @ 60Hz
N/A
1080p @ 120Hz
7.0 ms
1440p @ 120Hz
7.0 ms
4k @ 120Hz
6.8 ms
1080p with Variable Refresh Rate
5.8 ms
1440p with VRR
6.1 ms
4k with VRR
13.8 ms
8k with VRR
N/A

Update 11/04/2020: We've retested the input lag at 4k @ 120Hz with chroma 4:4:4 and VRR using an HDMI 2.1 source. The results are consistent with the LG CX OLED's.

The LG GX has the same low input lag as the LG CX OLED. It's the lowest with VRR enabled, which is great. To achieve the lowest input lag possible, you have to be in 'Game' mode. The TV has an 'Auto Low Latency Mode' that automatically switches into 'Game' mode when a game from a compatible device is launched. For it to work, simply enable Instant Game Response. Sadly, you can't use the motion interpolation feature in 'Game' mode.

If you're using this TV as a PC monitor and want the lowest input lag possible, set the input icon to 'PC' in the Home Dashboard.

9.6
Inputs
Supported Resolutions
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
1440p @ 60Hz
Yes (forced resolution required)
1440p @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
4k @ 60Hz
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Yes
4k @ 120Hz
Yes (native support)
8k @ 30Hz or 24Hz
No
8k @ 60Hz
No

Update 11/04/2020: We've retested the TV's ability to display chroma 4:4:4 at 4k @ 120Hz with an HDMI 2.1 source. It can display it properly, but only in 'PC' mode.

This TV supports most common resolutions up to 4k @ 120Hz. It displays chroma 4:4:4 on all resolutions except 1080p @ 120Hz, which is an issue we saw with the LG CX OLED. For it to display 4:4:4, set the input icon to 'PC' in the Home Dashboard.

To achieve full bandwidth, enable HDMI Ultra HD Deep Color.

Inputs
Advanced Console Compatibility
Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM)
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 120Hz + HDR
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 120Hz
Yes
PS5, 4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Yes
PS5, 1440p @ 120Hz
PS5 can't do 1440p
PS5, 1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
PS5, Variable Refresh Rate
PS5 can't do VRR yet
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 120Hz + HDR
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, 4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Yes
Xbox Series X, 1440p @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, 1080p @ 120Hz
Yes
Xbox Series X, Variable Refresh Rate
Yes

Update 07/26/2021: We rechecked the supported formats on the Xbox Series X, and confirmed that it does in fact support Dolby Vision, but not with a 4k @ 120Hz signal at the moment. LG has confirmed that they're working on a fix for that.

Inputs
Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Yes
HDR10+
No
Dolby Vision
Yes
HLG
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
HDMI 2.1 Class Bandwidth
Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
CEC Yes
HDCP 2.2 Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
USB 3.0
No
Variable Analog Audio Out Yes
Wi-Fi Support Yes (2.4 GHz, 5 GHz)

Update 11/04/2020: We've retested the inputs with an HDMI 2.1 source. All the HDMI inputs support it.

The LG GX doesn't support full bandwidth HDMI 2.1. It only has 40Gbps ports capable of 4k @ 120Hz @ 4:4:4 10-bit, instead of 48Gbps ports which would be able to reach 12-bit, but we don't expect this to make any noticeable difference.

Inputs
Input Photos
Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI 4
USB 3
Digital Optical Audio Out 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm 1
Analog Audio Out RCA 0
Component In 0
Composite In 1 (incl. adapter)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) 1
Ethernet 1
DisplayPort 0
IR In 0
SD/SDHC 0

Update 09/16/2021: We had originally listed that the LG GX OLED has an IR In port. The IR port is for an IR Blaster, which is an output device, not an input. There's no IR input on this TV.

Inputs
Audio Passthrough
ARC
Yes (HDMI 2)
eARC support
Yes
Dolby Atmos via TrueHD via eARC
Yes
DTS:X via DTS-HD MA via eARC
No
5.1 Dolby Digital via ARC
Yes
5.1 DTS via ARC
No
5.1 Dolby Digital via Optical
Yes
5.1 DTS via Optical
No

The LG GX supports eARC, allowing it to send high-quality Dolby Atmos via TrueHD sound to a compatible receiver through a HDMI connection. To do so, turn HDMI Arc on and enable eARC. Unfortunately, LG has dropped DTS decoding from their 2020 TVs.

Sound Quality
7.6
Sound Quality
Frequency Response
Low-Frequency Extension
67.27 Hz
Std. Dev. @ 70
2.42 dB
Std. Dev. @ 80
2.44 dB
Std. Dev. @ Max
5.52 dB
Max
93.3 dB SPL
Dynamic Range Compression
5.19 dB

The LG GX has a good frequency response. Its bass has some punch to it, but it can't get low enough for any rumble or thump. It gets loud and it has a well-balanced sound profile, so dialogue sounds clear.

LG sells an LG GX Soundbar that also sits flush against the wall.

7.2
Sound Quality
Distortion
Weighted THD @ 80
0.390
Weighted THD @ Max
2.325
IMD @ 80
0.96%
IMD @ Max
2.18%

Decent distortion performance. There isn't much distortion at moderate listening levels. It increases at max volume, but most people may not hear this.

Smart Features
8.5
Smart Features
Interface
Smart OS WebOS
Version 5.0
Ease of Use
Easy
Smoothness
Average
Time Taken to Select YouTube
2 s
Time Taken to Change Backlight
7 s
Advanced Options
Many

The built-in WebOS interface is easy-to-use and it's fairly smooth to navigate.

0
Smart Features
Ad-Free
Ads
Yes
Opt-out
No
Suggested Content in Home
Yes
Opt-out of Suggested Content
No

Unfortunately, there are ads on the home screen and app store, and there's no way to disable them.

8.0
Smart Features
Apps and Features
App Selection
Great
App Smoothness
Average
Cast Capable
Yes
USB Drive Playback
Yes
USB Drive HDR Playback
Yes
HDR in Netflix
Yes
HDR in YouTube
Yes

LG's app store has a great selection of apps available to download.

9.0
Smart Features
Remote
Size
Large
Voice Control
Many Features
CEC Menu Control
Yes
Other Smart Features
Yes
Remote App LG TV Plus

The LG GX comes with the same Magic Remote as most other 2020 LG TVs. You can use it like a traditional remote with its navigation buttons or use it as a point-and-press remote, like a computer mouse. There are shortcut buttons to Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. It has built-in voice control that allows you to change inputs, search for content, ask for the weather, and you can even ask it to increase the brightness.

Smart Features
TV Controls

There's a single button underneath the center of the screen. It allows you to turn the TV On/Off, change inputs, volume, and channels.

Smart Features
In The Box

  • Wall-mount (with included screws, tape, and mounting instructions)
  • IR Blaster
  • Remote (with 2x AA batteries)
  • Composite adapter
  • User guide

Smart Features
Misc
Power Consumption 87 W
Power Consumption (Max) 154 W
Firmware 03.10.41

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the 55 inch LG GX (OLED55GXPUA) and we expect our results to be valid for the 65 inch (OLED65GXPUA) and 77 inch (OLED77GXPUA) models too. You can see the different model numbers for the GX series between North America and Europe below.

Size North America Europe
55" OLED55GXPUA OLED55GX6LA
65" OLED65GXPUA OLED65GX6LA
77" OLED77GXPUA OLED77GX6LA

If someone comes across a different type of panel or if their LG GX doesn't correspond to our review, let us know and we'll update the review. Note that some tests such as the gray uniformity may vary between individual units.

The GX we reviewed was manufactured in March 2020, and you can see the label here.

Compared To Other TVs

The LG GX is an excellent TV and like most OLEDs, it delivers exceptional picture quality. However, it doesn't stand out much against the cheaper LG CX OLED, so if you need a stand or you simply want to VESA-mount the TV, the GX isn't worth it for its price. Also see our recommendations for the best 4k TVs, the best OLED TVs, and the best LG TVs.

LG CX OLED
48" 55" 65" 77"

In terms of picture quality, the LG GX OLED and the LG CX OLED are two very similar TVs and any differences come down to panel variance. Our unit of the CX has much better color accuracy, better gradient handling, and it gets slightly brighter. However, our unit of the GX has wider viewing angles. The major difference between them is that the GX comes with a wall mount that makes it sit flush against a wall, while the CX comes with a stand.

LG C1 OLED
48" 55" 65" 77" 83"

The LG GX OLED and the LG C1 OLED offer very similar performance overall. The biggest difference between them is design. The GX is more of a statement piece, extremely thin, and designed to sit flush against the wall. It doesn't even come with a stand out of the box—you have to buy one separately. In terms of performance, both TVs have OLED panels with stunning picture quality, but the C1 comes with the latest version of webOS and a redesigned Magic Remote, along with a new gaming setting to reduce input lag further. Both are amazing TVs.

Sony A80J OLED
55" 65" 77"

The Sony A80J OLED and the LG GX OLED are excellent TVs with OLED panels that can individually turn off pixels and produce perfect blacks. They especially differ in design, as the LG has a unique 'gallery' design with an exceptionally thin profile intended to be wall-mounted. The LG gets a bit brighter in HDR and has a bit less input lag for gaming or PC use, but the Sony has better out-of-the-box accuracy.

Sony A90J OLED
55" 65" 83"

The LG GX OLED and the Sony A90J OLED are both high-end, well-designed OLED TVs. If you want something that looks sleek and will sit absolutely flush against the wall, the LG is one of the thinnest TVs we've tested, designed to look like a piece of art on your wall. Otherwise, the two perform very similarly, delivering the same perfect black levels that all OLEDs do, but the Sony currently lacks VRR support. That said, the Sony also gets a bit brighter in HDR and is technically capable of hitting an exceptionally high peak brightness in 'Vivid' mode, but not for sustained periods of time.

Sony A8H OLED
55" 65"

The LG GX OLED is a bit better than the Sony A8H OLED. The LG has VRR support, lower input lag, HDMI 2.1 support, and it has wider viewing angles. However, the Sony has better out-of-the-box color accuracy, better gradient handling, and it gets slightly brighter.

Sony A9G OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG GX OLED is better than the Sony A9G OLED, mainly because the LG has extra gaming features. The LG has VRR support, a Black Frame Insertion feature that can flicker at 120Hz, and much lower input lag. It also gets brighter and it has HDMI 2.1 support. However, the Sony has much better gradient handling.

LG C9 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG C9 OLED and the LG GX OLED are two similar TVs with different designs. The GX is meant to be wall-mounted and comes with a dedicated wall-mount instead of a stand. It also has a wider VRR range, a Black Frame Insertion feature that flickers at 120Hz, and better speakers. On the other hand, the C9 comes with a stand and has better out-of-the-box color accuracy, but this may vary between units.

LG G1 OLED
55" 65" 77"

The LG G1 OLED replaces the LG GX OLED, and they're each very similar. The main difference is that the G1 has the new evo panel, allowing it to get brighter than the GX in HDR, so small highlights pop more. The G1 comes with a redesigned remote and an updated version of the built-in webOS, but other than that, the TVs each deliver similar, exceptional picture quality.

Samsung QN90A QLED
43" 50" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED and the Samsung QN90A QLED are both excellent TVs with different panel types. The LG's OLED panel provides an infinite contrast ratio, perfect black uniformity, and wide viewing angles. On the other hand, the Samsung's LED panel gets significantly brighter, which is great for watching HDR content, and it doesn't suffer from burn-in like the LG. In terms of gaming, they each have HDMI 2.1 support; the LG has four HDMI 2.1 inputs, while the Samsung just has one.

LG BX OLED
55" 65"

The LG BX OLED and the LG GX OLED are extremely similar TVs. The main differences are in its design. The GX is designed to sit flush against the wall and it doesn't come with a stand; the BX is more standard as it comes with a center-mounted stand. They each have an infinite contrast ratio thanks to their OLED panels, and while the GX gets a bit brighter, it shouldn't be that noticeable.

Samsung Q90/Q90T QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung Q90/Q90T QLED and the LG GX OLED are both excellent premium TVs with different panel types. The LG uses an OLED panel that has an infinite contrast ratio, resulting in perfect blacks. It also has wider viewing angles than the Samsung and the response time is much quicker, resulting in smooth motion. On the other hand, the Samsung is a better choice for use in well-lit rooms or HDR content because it gets much brighter in both SDR and HDR. Also, the Samsung doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in like the LG.

Samsung The Frame 2021
43" 50" 55" 65" 75"

The LG GX OLED is much better than the Samsung The Frame 2021 for most uses. The LG is OLED, while the Samsung uses a VA panel. The LG has better picture quality due to its near-infinite contrast ratio, and because it doesn't require a backlight, there's no blooming around bright objects. It also has wider viewing angles and better reflection handling. However, it doesn't get very bright, which means that if you tend to watch TV in a well-lit room, the Samsung might be a better choice. The LG has significantly faster response times to deliver a clearer image in fast-moving scenes, but it also stutters more in low frame rate content like movies. Both TVs have a 120Hz refresh rate and HDMI 2.1 support. The LG is compatible with NVIDIA's G-SYNC, whereas the Samsung isn't.

Samsung QN85A QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Samsung QN85A QLED and the LG GX OLED are both high-end 4k TVs but use different panel technologies, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The LG is an OLED, so it can produce perfect blacks and has a near-instantaneous response time. The Samsung, on the other hand, is an LCD TV that uses Mini LED backlighting, which allows it to get very bright. The Samsung uses an IPS panel, so its native contrast ratio is low and it has issues with blooming. For that reason, the LG is a better option if you care about picture quality.

Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED
49" 50" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED is better overall than the Samsung Q80/Q80T QLED, but they have different panel types. The LG has an OLED panel, allowing it to individually turn off pixels, which results in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has a near-instant response time and wider viewing angles, great if you have a large seating area. However, the Samsung gets brighter, so it's a better choice for well-lit rooms, and it doesn't have permanent burn-in risk like OLEDs.

Sony X90J
50" 55" 65" 75"

The LG GX OLED and the Sony X900H are very different TVs. The LG is better overall because it's an OLED TV with a near-infinite contrast ratio. This means it can display perfect blacks, and unlike the Sony, it doesn't have blooming around objects in dark scenes because it doesn't have a backlight. The LG has wider viewing angles and better reflection handling. It also has a much better color gamut for HDR, but it doesn't get as bright. The LG's response time is significantly faster; however, it stutters more in low frame rate content like movies. VRR support is already available on the LG, but not on the Sony.

Sony X950H
49" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED is much better overall than the Sony X950H, but they have different panel types. The LG is a uniquely-designed TV that's meant to sit flush against the wall and doesn't come with a stand. Its OLED panel has self-emitting pixels, meaning it has an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has wider viewing angles and HDMI 2.1 support for gaming. However, the X950H has an LED panel, which gets much brighter and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in like the LG.

Samsung Q80/Q80A QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED is a much better TV than the Samsung Q80/Q80A QLED mainly because they have different panel types. The LG has an OLED panel that provides a near-infinite contrast ratio for perfect blacks. It also has wider viewing angles, and it's better for gaming because it has a near-instant response time. However, the Samsung gets much brighter, so it's a better choice for well-lit rooms, and it doesn't suffer from the risk of permanent burn-in like OLEDs do.

Sony X900H
55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED is better overall than the Sony X900H, but they have different panel types. The LG has an OLED panel, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It has a near-instant response time, so motion is smoother, and it has wider viewing angles. On the other hand, the Sony gets brighter, so it's a better choice for bright rooms, and it doesn't have permanent burn-in risk like OLEDs.

Sony A9S OLED
48"

The Sony A9S OLED and the LG GX OLED are very similar overall as they're both 4k OLED TVs. However, the LG is a bit better because it can display a 4k @ 120Hz signal and has HDMI 2.1 ports. It's also a better choice for gaming due to its lower input lag and VRR support. The Sony has better accuracy out of the box, so you may not need to calibrate it for accurate color reproduction. It gets brighter in SDR to combat glare, but the Automatic Brightness Limiter is a bit more aggressive, causing more brightness variability.

Samsung Q70/Q70A QLED
55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED is better than the Samsung Q70/Q70A QLED, but they're very different TVs. The LG is a high-end OLED, while the Samsung is a lower mid-range LED TV. The Samsung uses a VA panel, so it has a fantastic contrast ratio, but it still doesn't quite compare with the near-infinite contrast of the LG. The LG also has wider viewing angles, a faster response time, and feels more premium, but the Samsung doesn't have any risk of burn-in.

Samsung QN900A 8k QLED
65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED and the Samsung QN900A 8k QLED are very different TVs, but the LG has a bit more to recommend. While the LG can't display an 8k signal like the Samsung, 8k still isn't quite worth it at this point, and the LG's OLED panel can produce perfect blacks and has a nearly instant response time. The Samsung has a surprisingly low native contrast ratio and has quite a bit of blooming. It does, however, get very bright, so it's better suited to very bright rooms.

Sony X80J
43" 50" 55" 65" 75"

The LG GX OLED is better than the Sony X80J, but they're also very different TVs. The LG is a high-end OLED that can produce perfect blacks and with a near-instantaneous response time. The Sony, on the other hand, is an entry-level IPS TV, so it has a low contrast ratio and lacks a lot of the features that the LG has. While it has good viewing angles, they're not as wide as the LG's viewing angles. The LG outperforms the Sony in almost every way.

Samsung Q900TS 8k QLED
65" 75" 85"

The Samsung Q900TS 8k QLED and the LG GX OLED are very different TVs with different panels and resolutions, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The LG can produce perfect blacks by turning pixels off individually, making it ideal for dark room viewing. It also has a near-instantaneous response time, making motion look clear. However, it doesn't get very bright, so the Samsung may be better for well-lit environments. While the LG can't support an 8k signal like the Samsung, there's still very little native 8k content, so its value is arguable given the performance advantages of the OLED. 

Samsung The Frame 2020
32" 43" 50" 55" 65" 75"

The LG GX OLED and the Samsung The Frame 2020 are two TVs that come with a wall mount and are designed to sit flush against a wall. The LG is better overall because it's much thinner, it has an infinite contrast ratio, much wider viewing angles, and G-SYNC support. However, the Samsung gets brighter in HDR, it has lower input lag, and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

LG NANO90 2020
55" 65" 75" 86"

The LG GX OLED is much better than the LG NANO90 2020, but they use different panel types. The GX's OLED panel can turn off individual pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has much wider viewing angles and has a near-instant response time. On the other hand, the NANO90's LED panel appears to be immune from permanent burn-in, unlike the GX.

Samsung Q70/Q70T QLED
55" 65" 75" 82" 85"

The LG GX OLED is much better than the Samsung Q70/Q70T QLED, but each TV has a different panel type. The LG's OLED panel allows it to display perfect blacks and has much wider viewing angles as well. The LG also has a quicker response time and lower input lag for a better gaming experience. However, the Samsung gets brighter in SDR, so it can combat glare in well-lit rooms, and it doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in.

LG NANO99 8k 2020
65" 75"

The LG GX OLED is significantly better than the LG NANO99 8k 2020. The GX has an OLED panel that can individually turn off pixels and it produces perfect blacks. It also has much wider viewing angles, better reflection handling, a near-instant response time, and gaming features like VRR support. However, the NANO99 displays 8k content, gets slightly brighter, and doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in associated with OLEDs.

Hisense H9G
55" 65"

The LG GX OLED is better overall than the Hisense H9G, but they have different panel types. The LG's OLED panel turns off individual pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It has much wider viewing angles and has gaming features like HDMI 2.1 and VRR support. However, the Hisense has an LED panel that gets much brighter, which is great for HDR content, and it doesn't suffer from the risk of permanent burn-in.

Samsung TU7000
43" 50" 55" 58" 60" 65" 70" 75" 82"

The LG GX OLED is much better than the Samsung TU7000, mainly because they use different panel types. The LG is a premium TV with an OLED panel and infinite contrast ratio for perfect black levels. It also has much wider viewing angles, more gaming features like HDMI 2.1 and VRR support, and it displays a wide color gamut for HDR content. The Samsung is an entry-level TV with an LED panel, and it doesn't have the burn-in risk like the LG.

Samsung Q60/Q60T QLED
43" 50" 55" 58" 65" 75" 82" 85"

The LG GX OLED is a far better TV than the Samsung Q60/Q60T QLED, but they have different panel types. The LG's OLED panel allows it to display perfect blacks with an infinite contrast ratio. It also has wider viewing angles, which is great if you have a wide seating area. The LG is better for gaming because it has HDMI 2.1 support, allowing it to support 4k @ 120Hz games, and it has VRR support. However, the LED panel of the Samsung doesn't have permanent burn-in risk like on an OLED.

LG UP8000
43" 50" 55" 60" 65" 70" 75" 82" 86"

The LG UP8000 and the LG GX OLED are very different TVs. The UP8000 is a budget IPS TV, while the GX is a high-end OLED. For the most part, the GX performs better. It delivers better picture quality due to its higher contrast ratio, wider color gamut, and faster response times. It also has a higher refresh rate of 120Hz and VRR support, which the UP8000 lacks. However, the GX is susceptible to permanent burn-in, whereas the UP8000 isn't.

Hisense H8G
50" 55" 65" 75"

The LG GX OLED is much better than the Hisense H8G, but they have different features. The LG is a high-end OLED that doesn't come with a stand because it's meant to sit flush against the wall. Its self-emitting pixels create an infinite contrast ratio and wide viewing angles, and it's packed with gaming features such as VRR support. However, the Hisense is a basic, entry-level model that gets brighter than the LG and its LED panel appears to be immune to permanent burn-in.

Samsung TU8000
43" 50" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED is a much better TV than the Samsung TU8000, but they have different panel types. The LG is a premium model whose OLED panel can produce perfect blacks thanks to its infinite contrast ratio. It also displays a wider color gamut for HDR content, has a much quicker response time, and has VRR support for gaming, which the Samsung doesn't have. However, the LED panel of the entry-level Samsung doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in like the LG.

Sony X800H
43" 49" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED is much better than the Sony X800H, but they use different panel types. The LG has an OLED panel with an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It's better for gaming thanks to its VRR and HDMI 2.1 support, and its near-instant response time. However, the Sony uses an LED panel that's immune to permanent burn-in, and it gets brighter than the LG.

Hisense H6510G
50" 55" 65" 75" 85"

The LG GX OLED is significantly better than the Hisense H6510G. The LG has an OLED panel with an infinite contrast ratio, perfect black uniformity, and wide viewing angles. It also gets brighter, handles reflections better, and displays a wider color gamut. However, the Hisense doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in like most OLED TVs.

Hisense R6090G
43" 50" 55" 65"

The LG GX OLED is significantly better than the Hisense R6090G. The LG has an OLED panel and it can individually turn off pixels, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio and perfect black uniformity. It also has wider viewing angles, better reflection handling, and it has a bunch of gaming features like VRR support. However, the Hisense doesn't have the risk of permanent burn-in the way OLEDs have.

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