Gigabyte M27Q Monitor Review

Tested using Methodology v1.1
Reviewed Jan 20, 2021 at 09:51 am
Gigabyte M27Q Picture
8.1
Mixed Usage
8.0
Office
8.5
Gaming
7.9
Multimedia
8.0
Media Creation
7.3
HDR Gaming
Size 27"
Resolution 2560x1440
Max Refresh Rate
170 Hz
Pixel Type
IPS
Variable Refresh Rate
FreeSync

The Gigabyte M27Q is an excellent 1440p gaming monitor suitable for a wide variety of uses. It has a large 27 inch screen that provides an immersive gaming experience and plenty of screen real estate for work. It has an incredibly low input lag, exceptional response time, and a high refresh rate to deliver smooth and responsive gameplay. Its IPS panel has wide viewing angles that make it easier to share content or play co-op games; however, it comes at the cost of a lower contrast ratio, which makes blacks appear gray in dark environments. Unfortunately, it lacks swivel adjustment and can't rotate to portrait mode, and even though it supports HDR, it doesn't get quite bright enough to deliver a true HDR experience. On the upside, it has tons of additional features, including a Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture mode, a USB-C port that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode, and a KVM feature that lets you control two devices with your mouse and keyboard.

Our Verdict

8.1 Mixed Usage

The Gigabyte M27Q is a great monitor for most uses. Its low input lag, exceptional response time, and high refresh rate make it excellent for gaming. It has a big, high-resolution screen that provides incredible immersion, as well as plenty of screen space for work. It has wide viewing angles so that images remain accurate when viewing off-center, but it lacks swivel adjustment, which might make it harder to share your screen depending on your setup. It has near-full coverage of the Adobe RGB color space, making it a great choice for photo editors. Unfortunately, it has a low contrast ratio and doesn't get bright enough to deliver a true HDR experience.

Pros
  • Large screen and high resolution.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Good visibility in bright rooms.
  • Exceptional SDR color gamut.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in dark environments.
  • Poor ergonomics.
8.0 Office

The Gigabyte M27Q is great for office use. It delivers clear text thanks to its high resolution, and its 27 inch screen provides plenty of space for multitasking. It has wide viewing angles so that images remain accurate when viewed from the side; however, it lacks swivel adjustment, which might be an issue if you need to turn the screen around to show your work to others. It has a USB-C port that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode, allowing you to display a signal from a compatible device and charge it simultaneously with a single cable, but it can only deliver up to 10W of power, which is rather disappointing.

Pros
  • Large screen and high resolution.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Good visibility in bright rooms.
  • Exceptional SDR color gamut.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in dark environments.
  • Poor ergonomics.
8.5 Gaming

The Gigabyte M27Q is excellent for gaming. It has exceptional response time, low input lag, and a high refresh rate to deliver incredibly smooth and responsive gameplay. Its large, high-resolution screen feels immersive, and it has wide viewing angles so that you can share content easily. Unfortunately, it has poor ergonomics, which makes it harder to place the screen the way you want. Also, it isn't well-suited for dark rooms because it has a low contrast ratio that makes blacks appear gray.

Pros
  • Exceptional response time.
  • High refresh rate.
  • VRR support.
  • Large screen and high resolution.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in dark environments.
  • Poor ergonomics.
7.9 Multimedia

The Gigabyte M27Q is good for media consumption. It has a large, high-resolution screen that provides an immersive viewing experience, and you can share content easily thanks to its wide viewing angles. It's well-suited for bright rooms because it fights glare easily; however, it isn't ideal for dark rooms due to its low contrast ratio. Sadly, the ergonomics are poor, so it might be hard to place the screen at your optimal viewing position.

Pros
  • Large screen and high resolution.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Good visibility in bright rooms.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in dark environments.
  • Poor ergonomics.
8.0 Media Creation

The Gigabyte M27Q is great for content creation. It has a big screen with a high resolution so that you can work comfortably with multiple windows opened side-by-side. It has an exceptional SDR color gamut with full sRGB and near-full Adobe RGB coverage, and accuracy is outstanding out of the box, so you might not need to calibrate it. Its wide viewing angles make it easier to share your work with coworkers and clients, and it provides good visibility in bright settings. Unfortunately, it doesn't allow for swivel adjustment and can't rotate to portrait mode.

Pros
  • Large screen and high resolution.
  • Wide viewing angles.
  • Good visibility in bright rooms.
  • Exceptional SDR color gamut.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in dark environments.
  • Poor ergonomics.
7.3 HDR Gaming

The Gigabyte M27Q is decent for gaming in HDR, although mostly due to its excellent gaming performance. It has a great color gamut with excellent DCI P3 coverage, but it only gets bright enough to make some highlights pop in HDR games. Also, it has a low contrast ratio that makes blacks appear gray in the dark and lacks a local dimming feature. Black uniformity is sub-par as there's a lot of backlight bleed; however, this varies between units, so yours may be different.

Pros
  • Exceptional response time.
  • High refresh rate.
  • VRR support.
  • Large screen and high resolution.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in dark environments.
  • Poor ergonomics.
  • No local dimming.
  • Doesn't get bright enough for a true HDR experience.
  • 8.1 Mixed Usage
  • 8.0 Office
  • 8.5 Gaming
  • 7.9 Multimedia
  • 8.0 Media Creation
  • 7.3 HDR Gaming
  1. Updated Nov 25, 2021: We decreased the text clarity score from 7.5 to 7.0, as the BGR subpixel layout can be an issue for some users.
  2. Updated Feb 12, 2021: We tested text clarity with a MacBook running on Big Sur.
  3. Updated Jan 25, 2021: We've retested the monitor to further investigate the BGR sub-pixel layout's effect on text clarity.
  4. Updated Jan 20, 2021: Review published.
  5. Updated Jan 13, 2021: Early access published.

Video

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Curved No
Curve Radius Not Curved
Weight (without stand)
9.0 lbs (4.1 kg)
Weight (with stand)
13.7 lbs (6.2 kg)

The Gigabyte M27Q Gaming Monitor has a relatively simple design that's nearly identical to the Gigabyte G27QC but with a flat, non-curved screen. It has thin borders on three sides with a slightly thicker bottom bezel and a flat V-shaped stand.

Design
Stand
Width
15.7" (40.0 cm)
Depth
7.4" (18.8 cm)

The stand doesn't take up much desk space, and since it's flat, you can still put things on top of it. It feels sturdy, and the screen doesn't wobble much when nudged.

5.3
Design
Ergonomics
Height Adjustment
5.1" (13.0 cm)
Switch Portrait/Landscape No
Swivel Range No swivel
Tilt Range -20° to 5°

The Gigabyte M27Q has poor ergonomics, but it's better than most budget models, like the MSI Optix G272 or the LG 32GN600-B. It only allows for height and tilt adjustments, making it harder to place the screen for optimal viewing and for sharing content with others. If you'd prefer a gaming monitor with better ergonomics, check out the Dell Alienware AW2721D.

Design
Back
Wall Mount VESA 100x100

The back has a clean and modern design that's identical to the Gigabyte G27QC, with the same mix of matte and glossy plastic. The stand has a small cutout for cable management. Unfortunately, there's no quick-release feature to remove the stand for VESA-mounting.

Design
Borders
Borders
0.3" (0.8 cm)

The Gigabyte M27Q has thin borders that aren't distracting, great for a multi-monitor setup.

Design
Thickness
Thickness (with stand)
5.8" (14.8 cm)
Thickness (without stand)
1.7" (4.3 cm)

The Gigabyte M27Q is thin with and without the stand. It doesn't require a deep desk and doesn't stick out when VESA-mounted.

7.5
Design
Build Quality

The Gigabyte M27Q's build quality is good. It's entirely made out of plastic, but it feels sturdy, and there are no obvious issues with the construction. There's very little flex on the back, and the stand supports the monitor well.

Picture Quality
6.3
Picture Quality
Contrast
Native Contrast
1,184 : 1
Contrast With Local Dimming
N/A

Like most IPS panel monitors, the Gigabyte G27Q has a mediocre contrast ratio, which results in blacks looking grayish when viewed in the dark. It's slightly higher than the advertised 1000:1 contrast; however, this can vary between individual units. If you want a similar budget model with better contrast, check out the LG 32GN600-B.

0
Picture Quality
Local Dimming
Local Dimming
No
Backlight
Edge

The Gigabyte M27Q monitor doesn't have a local dimming feature. The video above is provided for reference only.

8.3
Picture Quality
SDR Peak Brightness
SDR Real Scene
434 cd/m²
SDR Peak 2% Window
422 cd/m²
SDR Peak 10% Window
423 cd/m²
SDR Peak 25% Window
423 cd/m²
SDR Peak 50% Window
423 cd/m²
SDR Peak 100% Window
423 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 2% Window
422 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 10% Window
422 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 25% Window
423 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 50% Window
422 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 100% Window
423 cd/m²
SDR ABL
0.000

The Gigabyte G27Q has great SDR peak brightness, quite a bit higher than the advertised 350 cd/m². There's no brightness variation when displaying different scenes, and it's bright enough to combat glare.

We measured the SDR peak brightness in the 'Custom 1' Picture Mode with Brightness set to max.

7.0
Picture Quality
HDR Peak Brightness
HDR Real Scene
443 cd/m²
HDR Peak 2% Window
432 cd/m²
HDR Peak 10% Window
434 cd/m²
HDR Peak 25% Window
434 cd/m²
HDR Peak 50% Window
434 cd/m²
HDR Peak 100% Window
435 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 2% Window
432 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 10% Window
432 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 25% Window
433 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 50% Window
434 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 100% Window
434 cd/m²
HDR ABL
0.000

The HDR peak brightness is decent and meets the required 400 cd/m² for its DisplayHDR 400 certification. It's again very consistent, but not much brighter than in SDR. It can bring out some highlights in HDR games, but it's not bright enough for HDR movies.

We measured the HDR peak brightness in the 'Custom 1' Picture Mode with Brightness set to max.

8.0
Picture Quality
Horizontal Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Left
37°
Color Washout From Right
39°
Color Shift From Left
69°
Color Shift From Right
70°
Brightness Loss From Left
44°
Brightness Loss From Right
46°
Black Level Raise From Left
70°
Black Level Raise From Right
70°
Gamma Shift From Left
39°
Gamma Shift From Right
40°

The Gigabyte M27Q has great horizontal viewing angles. Images remain accurate when viewed from the side, good for sharing content or playing co-op games.

8.0
Picture Quality
Vertical Viewing Angle
Color Washout From Below
34°
Color Washout From Above
37°
Color Shift From Below
65°
Color Shift From Above
70°
Brightness Loss From Below
35°
Brightness Loss From Above
38°
Black Level Raise From Below
62°
Black Level Raise From Above
70°
Gamma Shift From Below
47°
Gamma Shift From Above
59°

This monitor has great vertical viewing angles, much better than the MSI Optix G272. This means that images remain accurate if you mount the monitor above eye level.

8.5
Picture Quality
Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
2.726%
50% DSE
0.123%
5% Std. Dev.
0.423%
5% DSE
0.064%

The Gigabyte M27Q has excellent gray uniformity; however, this can vary between units. The left and right edges are darker, but it's fairly minor and shouldn't be visible in most content. There's very little dirty screen effect, and uniformity is much better in near-dark scenes.

5.5
Picture Quality
Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
2.337%
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
N/A

Black uniformity is sub-par, but this can vary between individual units due to manufacturing tolerances. The whole screen looks blue/gray, and there's visible backlight bleed along the top and bottom edges. Also, the bottom edge seems to have a reddish tone. That said, this is only visible when viewing dark scenes in a dark room.

9.1
Picture Quality
Pre Calibration
Picture Mode
sRGB
Luminance
148 cd/m²
Luminance Settings
85
Contrast Setting
N/A
RGB Controls
Default
Gamma Setting
Default
Color Temperature
6,581 K
White Balance dE
1.45
Color dE
0.97
Gamma
2.25

The Gigabyte M27Q has outstanding accuracy out of the box. The minor inaccuracies with all colors and shades of gray aren't visible to the naked eye. The color temperature is very close to our 6500K target, slightly on the cooler side. Gamma follows the sRGB curve relatively well, but dark scenes appear darker than they should. Note that accuracy can vary between units.

9.3
Picture Quality
Post Calibration
Picture Mode
Custom 1
Luminance
102 cd/m²
Luminance Settings
12
Contrast Setting
50
RGB Controls
96-100-95
Gamma Setting
Gamma 3
Color Temperature
6,543 K
White Balance dE
1.21
Color dE
0.72
Gamma
2.18

Accuracy is only slightly better after calibration since it was already outstanding out of the box. White balance and color dE improved a bit, and the color temperature is closer to our 6500K target. Gamma is better, but very dark and very bright scenes are now over-brightened.

You can download our ICC profile calibration here. This is provided for reference only and shouldn't be used, as the calibration values vary per individual unit due to manufacturing tolerances, even for the same model.

9.8
Picture Quality
SDR Color Gamut
sRGB xy
99.7%
Adobe RGB xy
97.3%
sRGB Picture Mode
Custom 1
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Custom 1

The Gigabyte M27Q has a superb SDR color gamut. It covers the entire sRGB color space used in most content and has near-full coverage of the Adobe RGB color space. It's one of the highest Adobe RGB coverage that we've seen for a monitor in its price range, making it a fantastic choice for photo editors working in that color gamut.

9.6
Picture Quality
SDR Color Volume
sRGB In ICtCp
97.4%
Adobe RGB In ICtCp
95.2%
sRGB Picture Mode
Custom 1
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
Custom 1

Exceptional SDR color volume. It only has trouble displaying dark colors due to its low contrast ratio.

8.0
Picture Quality
HDR Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Yes
DCI P3 xy
85.8%
Rec. 2020 xy
74.1%
DCI P3 Picture Mode
Custom 1
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
Custom 1

The Gigabyte M27Q has a great HDR color gamut. It has excellent coverage of the commonly-used DCI P3 color space and decent coverage of the wider Rec. 2020.

The DCI P3 coverage is lower than the advertised 92%. This is due to the way we measure DCI P3. We measure DCI P3 by sending a Rec. 2020 signal, but unlike most reviewers, we limit the colors to the DCI P3 primaries. This results in a lower but arguably more accurate measurement.

7.0
Picture Quality
HDR Color Volume
DCI-P3 In ICtCp
79.0%
Rec. 2020 In ICtCp
61.9%
DCI P3 Picture Mode
Custom 1
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
Custom 1

Decent HDR color volume. It can't produce dark colors well due to its low contrast ratio. It also has difficulty with bright blues, although that's typical for LCDs.

10
Picture Quality
Image Retention
IR After 0 Min Recovery
0.00%
IR After 2 Min Recovery
0.00%
IR After 4 Min Recovery
0.00%
IR After 6 Min Recovery
0.00%
IR After 8 Min Recovery
0.00%
IR After 10 Min Recovery
0.00%

The Gigabyte M27Q doesn't show any signs of image retention; however, this can vary between individual units.

9.5
Picture Quality
Gradient
Color Depth
10 Bit

The Gigabyte M27Q has exceptional gradient handling. There's some very minor banding in the grays, which shouldn't be noticeable in most content.

10
Picture Quality
Color Bleed
Pixel Row Error
0.001%
Pixel Column Error
0.001%

There's no color bleed on the Gigabyte M27Q.

7.3
Picture Quality
Reflections
Screen Finish
Matte
Total Reflections
5.4%
Indirect Reflections
2.5%
Calculated Direct Reflections
2.8%

The Gigabyte M27Q has decent reflection handling, but it's not as good as the LG 32GP850-B. You may have some issues with glare if there's direct sunlight, but the screen gets bright enough to compensate. If reflection handling is important to you, then look into the Razer Raptor 27 165Hz.

7.0
Picture Quality
Text Clarity
Sub-Pixel Layout
BGR

Update 11/25/2021: We decreased the text clarity score from 7.5 to 7.0. The BGR subpixel layout isn't an issue in apps that support ClearType, but there are many apps that don't, and text clarity is an issue in those apps.

Update 02/12/2021: We tested text clarity with a MacBook running on Big Sur. It appears that macOS doesn't use sub-pixel dimming in any of the apps we tested, which includes Safari, TextEdit, Notes, Finder, and Chrome. This means that blurry text isn't caused by the BGR sub-pixel layout. We've added some photos below.

Update 01/25/2021: We've retested the monitor to further investigate the BGR sub-pixel layout's effect on text clarity. In most instances, text clarity is minimally impacted and shouldn't be an issue for most people. If it is, you can mount the monitor upside down, although there are some drawbacks as it increases input lag and causes G-SYNC to not work properly. We've also included more photos to show how text looks like at 100% and 125% scaling, with and without ClearType, and with the monitor upside down.

The Gigabyte M27Q has decent text clarity. Windows ClearType (top photo) makes diagonal lines look better, like on the R and N. It uses a BGR sub-pixel layout, which doesn't affect image quality, but it can cause blurry text, especially in programs that aren't affected by ClearType. That said, the difference in text clarity between RGB and BGR isn't very noticeable at native scaling unless you're actively looking for it, so it shouldn't be an issue for most people.

If text looks blurry due to the BGR sub-pixel layout, you can mount the screen upside down, which gives it a proper RGB layout. However, this workaround seems to increase the input lag to 15.1 ms instead of the 3.2 ms that we measured at maximum refresh rate. Also, G-SYNC doesn't work properly as it seems like there's some form of V-SYNC enabled when the screen is upside down. The larger version of this monitor, the Gigabyte M32Q, uses a standard RGB panel.

Here are some photos taken at 100% and 125% scaling, with ClearType on and off, as well as with the screen turned upside down:

No Scaling, Cleartype set to BGR

No Scaling, Cleartype off

No Scaling, Cleartype set to RGB

No Scaling, Google Sheets

125% Scaling, Cleartype set to BGR

125% Scaling, Cleartype off

125% Scaling, Cleartype set to RGB

125% Scaling, Google Sheets

Screen upside down, Cleartype Off

Screen upside down, Cleartype On

Screen upside down, Google Sheets

Here are some photos of text from a MacBook running on Big Sur:

TextEdit

Google Sheets in Safari

Safari Search Bar

Notes

Finder

Sheets in Google Chrome

Motion
9.3
Motion
Response Time @ Max Refresh Rate
Best Overdrive Setting
Picture Quality
Rise / Fall Time
4.7 ms
Total Response Time
8.4 ms
Overshoot Error
0.0%
Dark Rise / Fall Time
5.3 ms
Dark Total Response Time
9.1 ms
Dark Overshoot Error
0.0%

Overdrive Setting Response Time Chart Response Time Tables Motion Blur Photo
Picture Quality Chart Table Photo
Balance Chart Table Photo
Speed Chart Table Photo

The Gigabyte M27Q has exceptional response time at its max refresh rate, resulting in clear images and almost no blur trail behind fast-moving objects. Our recommended Overdrive setting is 'Picture Quality' because the other options have too much overshoot. The LG 32GP850-B has slightly better motion handling, thanks to the slightly faster refresh rate.

9.2
Motion
Response Time @ 60Hz
Best Overdrive Setting
Picture Quality
Rise / Fall Time
4.7 ms
Total Response Time
9.9 ms
Overshoot Error
0%
Dark Rise / Fall Time
5.2 ms
Dark Total Response Time
9.4 ms
Dark Overshoot Error
0.0%

Overdrive Setting Response Time Chart Response Time Tables Motion Blur Photo
Picture Quality Chart Table Photo
Balance Chart Table Photo
Speed Chart Table Photo

The Gigabyte M27Q's response time at 60Hz is outstanding. The image isn't as clear as at max refresh rate, but there's almost no trail behind fast-moving objects and no overshoot. The best Overdrive setting is again 'Picture Quality', which is great because you don't have to change the setting if your frame rate drops.

10
Motion
Image Flicker
Flicker-Free Yes
PWM Dimming Frequency
0 Hz

The Gigabyte M27Q 27 inch gaming monitor has a flicker-free backlight, which minimizes image duplication and helps reduce eye strain.

7.1
Motion
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Yes
BFI Maximum Frequency
170 Hz
BFI Minimum Frequency
100 Hz

The Gigabyte M27Q has an optional Black Frame Insertion feature to improve motion clarity, called Aim Stabilizer. However, it isn't usable while VRR is active, and it only works above 100Hz. When enabled, it locks the Overdrive setting to 'Speed'. Also, it causes slight image duplication due to crosstalk.

Note that the BFI score is based on the minimum and maximum frequency at which it can operate, not the BFI's performance.

9.2
Motion
Refresh Rate
Native
170 Hz
Max Refresh Rate
170 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
Yes
FreeSync
Yes
G-SYNC
Compatible (Tested)
VRR Maximum
170 Hz
VRR Minimum
< 20 Hz
VRR Supported Connectors DisplayPort, HDMI

Update 05/21/2021: Some users have reported that firmware version F02 allows the monitor to display a 1440p @ 120Hz signal from the Xbox Series X. We haven't tested it yet, so we can't confirm that it works.

The Gigabyte M27Q has a high refresh rate to provide a smooth and responsive gaming experience. However, it's only possible to reach 170Hz over a DisplayPort connection with 8-bit color coding. The maximum refresh rate at 10-bit is 120Hz. It supports Adaptive Sync and is compatible with both FreeSync and G-SYNC to reduce screen tearing. The refresh rate is limited to 144Hz over HDMI, and G-SYNC compatibility only works over a DisplayPort connection. If you want a monitor with an even higher refresh rate, consider the Acer Predator X25 bmiiprzx.

Some users have reported seeing a dark vertical grid pattern on solid colors when displaying moving content at 90Hz or below. This issue seems to vary from one unit to another. We can see it on our unit when displaying a test pattern, but it isn't noticeable when displaying regular content.

Inputs
9.6
Inputs
Input Lag
Native Resolution
3.2 ms
Native Resolution @ 60Hz
8.5 ms
Variable Refresh Rate
3.7 ms
Variable Refresh Rate @ 60Hz
8.9 ms
10 Bit HDR
N/A
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
3.9 ms

The Gigabyte M27Q has an exceptionally low input lag. We don't have a measurement for the input lag in 10-bit HDR because we lack the necessary tools to measure HDR input lag over a DisplayPort connection. Also, the maximum refresh rate at 10-bit is 120Hz over DisplayPort and 60Hz over HDMI. However, we don't expect the input lag to change with HDR enabled.

8.3
Inputs
Resolution And Size
Native Resolution 2560 x 1440
Aspect Ratio 16:9
Megapixels 3.7 MP
Pixel Density
109 PPI
Screen Diagonal 27.0"
Screen Area 310 in²

The Gigabyte M27Q has a large screen and high resolution, providing an immersive gaming experience and plenty of space for work and media consumption.

Inputs
Inputs
Inputs
Total Inputs
DisplayPort 1 (DP 1.2)
Mini DisplayPort No
HDMI 2 (HDMI 2.0)
DVI No
VGA No
DisplayPort Out No
USB 2 (USB 3.0)
USB C 1 (USB, USB PD, DP Alt Mode)
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm 1
Microphone In 3.5mm No
Digital Optical Audio Out No
Analog Audio Out RCA No
Power Supply External Brick

The Gigabyte M27Q has a KVM feature that allows you to use one set of mouse and keyboard to control two devices. To use it, plug the mouse and keyboard into the USB 3.0 ports and the secondary device into the USB-C port. Then, press the KVM button (located above the monitor's main control joystick) to switch between the two devices.

The USB-C port supports DisplayPort Alt Mode, which lets you display an image from a compatible device and charge it simultaneously with a single cable. However, this port only delivers 10W of power, which is only enough to charge smaller devices like a smartphone.

Features
Features
Additional Features
RGB Illumination
No
Speakers
No
HDR10 Yes
Multiple Input Display
PIP + PBP

The Gigabyte M27Q has many features, including:

  • Game Assist: Adds virtual crosshair, timer, or counter on the screen.
  • OSD Sidekick: Lets you control the monitor's settings with keyboard and mouse.
  • Dashboard: Overlay that displays system information like CPU temperature, usage, frame rate, etc.
  • Black Equalizer: Makes objects more visible in dark scenes.
  • Low Blue Light mode: Blue light filter to reduce eye strain.
  • Picture-in-Picture and Picture-by-Picture: Displays two input signals simultaneously.
  • KVM: Lets you control two devices with one set of mouse and keyboard. See Total Inputs section for more details.

Features
On-Screen Display (OSD)
Features
Controls

There's a single joystick on the right backside of the screen. It lets you power the monitor On/Off and navigate the on-screen menu. The KVM button is to switch between the two devices when using the KVM feature.

Features
In The Box

  • DisplayPort cable
  • 3x power cords (NA, EU, and Australia)
  • User guide
  • USB-A to USB-B upstream cable
  • HDMI cable
  • Power supply

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the Gigabyte M27Q 27" gaming monitor, and it's the only size available. There are many monitors in Gigabyte's non-Aorus lineup; you can see some of them in the table below. The higher-end Gigabyte M28U is a very different monitor, with a 4k, 144Hz IPS screen and two HDMI 2.1 ports. Some European retailers also carry an M27Q-EK or M27Q-EEK variant. It's the same monitor, but with the new energy efficiency labels.

Model Size Panel Type Resolution Refresh Rate Curved
M27Q 27" IPS 2560 x 1440 170Hz No
M27F 27" IPS 1920 x 1080 144Hz No
M28U 28" IPS 3840 x 2160 144Hz No
M32Q 32" IPS 2560 x 1440 170Hz  No
G27Q 27" IPS 2560 x 1440  144Hz No
G27QC 27" VA 2560 x 1440 165Hz Yes
G32QC 32" VA 2560 x 1440 165Hz Yes
G34WQC 34" VA 3440 x 1440 144Hz Yes

If someone comes across a different type of panel or their Gigabyte M27Q doesn't correspond to our review, let us know and we'll update the review. Note that some tests, like gray uniformity, may vary between individual units.

Our Gigabyte M27Q 27" gaming monitor was manufactured in August 2020; you can see the label here.

Compared To Other Monitors

The Gigabyte M27Q is an excellent gaming monitor that's well-suited for a wide variety of uses. It's one of the best in its price range gaming-wise, and it's a fantastic choice for photo editors due to its superb Adobe RGB coverage. However, it isn't ideal for dark rooms because it has a low contrast ratio, and its sub-par ergonomics make it harder to place the screen for optimal viewing. For more options, check out our recommendations for the best gaming monitors, the best 1440p gaming monitors, and the best budget gaming monitors.

Gigabyte G27Q

The Gigabyte M27Q is better for gaming than the Gigabyte G27Q. It has a higher 170Hz refresh rate and a much quicker response time at 60Hz, resulting in minimal motion blur. It has a better SDR color gamut, making it a better choice for content creators, and it has a KVM feature that allows you to control two devices with the same mouse and keyboard. On the other hand, the G27Q has a bit better reflection handling and gets slightly brighter in HDR, but these are minor differences and may be hard to notice.

Dell S2721DGF

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Dell S2721DGF are very similar overall. Gaming-wise, the Dell has faster response times. Its refresh rate is just a bit lower, 165Hz compared to the Gigabyte's 170Hz; however, this is a small difference that isn't noticeable. It also has significantly better ergonomics, making it easier to position the screen the way you want. On the other hand, the Gigabyte has more features. It includes a USB-C port that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode, an integrated KVM switch, and a Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture mode that lets you display two input signals simultaneously, which can be useful for streamers running on two computers.

LG 27GL850-B

The Gigabyte M27Q is a bit better than the LG 27GL850-B for most uses. Although they have similar response times, the Gigabyte has a higher refresh rate of 170Hz compared to the LG's 144Hz, resulting in a slightly smoother and more responsive gaming experience. Also, the Gigabyte's input lag is much lower at 60Hz than the LG's, making it more ideal for 60fps console gaming. For those in a well-lit room, the LG has better reflection handling, but it doesn't get as bright. The Gigabyte has more productivity features, including a USB-C port with DisplayPort Alt Mode support, an integrated KVM switch, and a Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture mode.

LG 27GL83A-B

The Gigabyte M27Q and the LG 27GL83A-B are quite similar as they're both 27 inch IPS gaming monitors with a 1440p resolution. In terms of gaming performance, the main difference is that the Gigabyte has a higher refresh rate of 170Hz compared to the LG's 144Hz, but it has a slightly slower response time. The Gigabyte is better for content creation because it has a much better SDR and HDR color gamut, as well as better accuracy out of the box. It also has more features, like a Picture-in-Picture and Picture-by-Picture mode, and a USB-C port that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode. However, the LG has wider viewing angles if you need to share your screen often, and it can rotate to portrait mode, which the Gigabyte can't.

Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T

The Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great monitors with excellent gaming performance. However, they're different. The Samsung is available in a 27 inch and 32 inch size, while the Gigabyte is only available in a 27 inch. The Samsung has a higher refresh rate of 240Hz and a faster response time, resulting in smoother motion and greater responsiveness, although the difference is not that big and might be hard to notice for casual players. The Samsung is better for dark rooms because it has a VA panel with a better contrast ratio, while the Gigabyte has wider viewing angles because it has an IPS panel. The Gigabyte has a few more features, like a USB-C input and KVM, which lets you control two devices with one set of peripherals.

Gigabyte M32Q

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Gigabyte M32Q are very similar overall, but the M32Q is slightly better for most people. The M32Q has better ergonomics, with a stand that can swivel and a wider height adjustment. The M32Q also uses a more standard RGB subpixel structure, whereas the M27Q uses a suboptimal BGR structure, which can cause some text clarity issues in certain apps.

Gigabyte G27QC

Overall, the Gigabyte M27Q performs better than the Gigabyte G27QC. Gaming-wise, the M27Q has a slightly higher 170Hz refresh rate, and its response time is much faster with less overshoot, resulting in clearer images in fast-moving scenes. The M27Q has wider viewing angles for sharing content and playing co-op games, and it gets much brighter to combat glare in well-lit rooms. It also has a much better SDR and HDR color gamut, making it better for content creators. If you often game in the dark, the G27QC might be a better choice because it has a VA panel that can produce deep blacks. Also, while its response time isn't as good as the M27Q's, it's still great and should satisfy most gamers.

BenQ EX2780Q

The BenQ EX2780Q and the Gigabyte M27Q are both 27 inch 1440p gaming monitors. The Gigabyte performs better for the most part. It has a higher refresh rate of 170Hz, a faster response time, and more features, like a USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a KVM.

ASUS TUF VG27AQ

The Gigabyte M27Q and the ASUS TUF VG27AQ perform very similarly. They're both 27 inch IPS monitors with a 1440p resolution. The Gigabyte has better response times at max refresh rate and 60Hz. Its refresh rate is slightly higher, 170Hz compared to the ASUS' 165Hz, but this isn't noticeable. Although both monitors have a Black Frame Insertion feature, only the ASUS' can be used simultaneously with VRR, and it works over a wider frequency range than the Gigabyte. The Gigabyte has more features for productivity, including a USB-C port with DisplayPort Alt Mode and Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture, but its BGR sub-pixel layout might bother some people as it can affect text clarity in some instances.

MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD

The MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD and the Gigabyte M27Q are two excellent gaming monitors with a 1440p resolution. They each have outstanding response time, low input lag, FreeSync support, and G-SYNC compatibility. The MSI has much better ergonomics, making it easy to place the screen how you like. However, the Gigabyte has much better out-of-the-box accuracy, so colors don't look over-saturated like they do on the MSI. It also has Picture-by-Picture/Picture-in-Picture modes, allowing you to display images from two sources at once.

LG 27GN800-B

The LG 27GN800-B and the Gigabyte M27Q are both excellent gaming monitors. Looking past the terrible ergonomics on the LG, they both perform fairly similarly. That said, the Gigabyte has an overclockable refresh rate of 170Hz, higher than the 144Hz max refresh rate of the LG. The Gigabyte also gets brighter in SDR and HDR, and it has one of the widest color gamuts on any monitor we've tested, which is great if you also do color-critical work. Even though its response time isn't quite as fast as the LG's, the Gigabyte offers more versatility thanks to its additional features, including USB 3.0 ports and a USB-C port, as well as a Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture mode. 

MSI Optix G273QF

The Gigabyte M27Q is better overall than the MSI Optix G273QF because it has many more features. The Gigabyte supports HDR, has Picture-by-Picture and Picture-in-Picture modes, and has a USB hub that allows you to connect your keyboard and mouse to the monitor. In terms of gaming performance, both monitors are similar with a quick response time, low input lag, and a high refresh rate.

Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q

The Gigabyte AORUS Fi27Q and the Gigabyte M27Q are very similar. The M27Q performs better for gaming because it has a faster response time, especially at 60Hz. It also has a USB-C input that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode and 10W charging. However, the FI27Q has much better ergonomics because it allows for swivel and pivot.

Gigabyte G32QC

The Gigabyte G32QC and the Gigabyte M27Q look physically similar, but they perform differently. The M27Q performs better for gaming because it has a higher refresh rate and a much faster response time. It has more features, like a USB-C input and an integrated KVM switch. However, if you like gaming in the dark, the G32QC is a better choice because it uses a VA panel with a much higher contrast ratio to produce deep blacks.

LG 27GP850-B

The Gigabyte M27Q and the LG 27GP850-B are very similar overall. The Gigabyte has a better vertical viewing angle, and the unit we bought has better accuracy out of the box. The LG has a faster refresh rate and a faster response time, making it a slightly better choice for most gamers.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL1A

The ASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL1A and the Gigabyte M27Q are very similar 1440p gaming monitors with a 170Hz refresh rate. Gaming-wise, the Gigabyte performs better because it has a faster response time, at max refresh rate and 60Hz. It also has wider viewing angles, gets brighter to combat glare, and offers more features like USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and an integrated KVM.

Acer Nitro XV272U KVbmiiprzx

The Acer Nitro XV272U KVbmiiprzx and the Gigabyte M27Q are very similar. They're both IPS monitors with a 1440p resolution and a 170Hz refresh rate. Gaming-wise, the Acer has better response times, at max refresh rate and 60Hz. It also has significantly better ergonomics because it allows for swivel adjustment and rotation to portrait mode. The Gigabyte has more features, like a USB-C input with DisplayPort Alt Mode and a Picture-in-Picture and Picture-by-Picture mode.

Samsung Odyssey G5 LC27G55T

The Samsung Odyssey G5 LC27G55T and the Gigabyte M27Q are both 1440p gaming monitors, but with different types of panels. The Samsung has a VA panel that's better suited for dark rooms, while the Gigabyte uses an IPS panel with wider viewing angles. As for gaming performance, the Gigabyte performs much better. It has a higher refresh rate of 170Hz and a much faster response time. The Gigabyte supports a wide color gamut for HDR, gets brighter, and offers more features like a USB-C input.

AOC 24G2

The AOC 24G2 and the Gigabyte M27Q are both excellent gaming monitors but with different specs. The AOC has a 24" screen with a 1080p resolution and a 144Hz refresh rate, while the Gigabyte has a 27" screen with a 1440p resolution and 170Hz refresh rate. The Gigabyte is a more versatile monitor because its larger screen and higher pixel density are better suited for productivity and media consumption. It also has wider viewing angles so that you can share content easily, and it gets brighter to combat glare. The Gigabyte supports HDR and can deliver a relatively decent experience, whereas the AOC doesn't support HDR at all.

Samsung Odyssey G7 S28AG70

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Samsung Odyssey G7 S28AG70 are both excellent for gaming, but they're different types of monitors. The Gigabyte has a 1440p resolution with a 170Hz refresh rate, while the Samsung has a 4k resolution with a 144Hz refresh, and it has HDMI 2.1 inputs that make it a good choice for console gaming. The Gigabyte has better motion handling at 60Hz because there's more overshoot on the Samsung. The Gigabyte also has more productivity options like a USB-C input, and it gets brighter, but the Samsung has better ergonomics because you can swivel it.

LG 27GN850-B

The LG 27GN850-B and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great 1440p IPS gaming monitors. They perform very similarly gaming-wise; the Gigabyte has a higher refresh rate of 170Hz, but the LG has a better response time. The Gigabyte offers more features, such as a USB-C input that supports DisplayPort and charging, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a KVM. It also has a wider color gamut for HDR and gets much brighter overall.

LG 27GP83B-B

The Gigabyte M27Q is slightly better than the LG 27GP83B-B, but the differences are minor overall. The Gigabyte has better vertical viewing angles, but the horizontal viewing angles are better on the LG. The LG has better reflection handling, but the Gigabyte we bought has slightly better contrast. Finally, the Gigabyte has an optional black frame insertion feature to reduce persistence blur.

ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27AQ and the Gigabyte M27Q are both excellent gaming monitors. They have a lot of similar features, including a 170Hz refresh rate, fast response times, and both support VRR to reduce screen tearing. At their max refresh rate, they both have an incredibly low input lag, but the ASUS has significantly more lag at 60Hz than the Gigabyte. If you're going to be using the monitor for content creation as well, the Gigabyte also offers greater coverage of the Adobe RGB color space, and it includes a USB-C port, allowing for more connectivity options.

Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx are excellent gaming monitors that stand out due to their exceptionally wide color gamuts. They also both have incredibly fast response times and low input lag. The biggest difference is that the Acer has a higher refresh rate of 270Hz versus the 170Hz on the Gigabyte.

Gigabyte M32U

The Gigabyte M32U is a bit better than the Gigabyte M27Q. The M32U has a larger, higher-resolution screen, resulting in much better text clarity, and it has better ergonomics. The M32U also has two HDMI 2.1 ports, making it a better choice for Sony PS5 or Xbox Series S|X gamers.

Dell S3422DWG

The Dell S3422DWG and the Gigabyte M27Q use different panel technologies, each with strengths and weaknesses. The Dell has a VA panel with much better black uniformity and better contrast. The IPS panel on the Gigabyte has much better viewing angles and a faster response time, resulting in clearer motion with less blur behind fast-moving objects.

Samsung Odyssey G5 S27AG50

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Samsung Odyssey G5 S27AG50 are both excellent 1440p gaming monitors. They have similar gaming features with exceptional motion handling and low input lag. The Samsung is better for co-op gaming because it has better ergonomics as the stand can swivel. While the models we tested are each 27 inches, the Samsung is also available in a 32 inch size if you prefer something bigger. However, the Gigabyte is better for productivity because it features a USB hub with two USB 3.0 inputs and a USB-C input, which the Samsung doesn't have.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG259QM

The Gigabyte M27Q and the ASUS TUF Gaming VG259QM are both excellent gaming monitors, but they have very different configurations. The ASUS delivers a smoother and more responsive gaming experience because it has a higher refresh rate and faster response time. However, the Gigabyte has a larger, higher-resolution screen to provide greater immersion and more screen space for work and media consumption. The ASUS allows for more ergonomic adjustments, including swivel and pivot, which the Gigabyte lacks.

ASUS TUF VG27VQ

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the ASUS TUF VG27VQ for most uses. The Gigabyte has a higher resolution to deliver sharper images and text. It also delivers a better gaming experience due to its much quicker response time. The Gigabyte supports HDR, gets brighter to combat glare, and offers more features, like USB-C input and a built-in KVM switch. It might be worth getting the ASUS if you want better dark room performance because it uses a VA panel with a much better contrast ratio, but its slow response time causes noticeable smearing that may bother some people.

AOC CQ27G2

Although the AOC CQ27G2 and the Gigabyte are both 1440p gaming monitors, there are many differences between them. Gaming-wise, the Gigabyte performs better because it has a higher refresh rate of 170Hz and a much faster response time. The Gigabyte has an IPS with wider viewing angles, while the AOC has a VA panel that makes it a better choice for dark rooms. The Gigabyte offers more features, like a USB-C input, HDR support, and a Picture-in-Picture mode. It also gets much brighter to combat glare.

Dell S2721QS

The Dell S2721QS and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different monitors. The Dell is a 4k productivity monitor with a 60Hz refresh rate, while the Gigabyte is a 1440p gaming monitor with a 170Hz refresh rate. If you only need it for work, the Dell is better because it delivers much sharper text due to its higher pixel density, and also because the Gigabyte has a BGR subpixel layout that may cause blurry text in some applications. However, the Gigabyte feels more responsive, and it offers more features, like a USB-C input.

Gigabyte M28U

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Gigabyte M28U are very similar, with a few key differences, so the best one depends on your usage. The M28U has a higher resolution screen, making it a better choice for office use or media creation. The M28U also features two HDMI 2.1 ports, so it's also a better choice for console gamers looking to get the most out of their PS5 or Xbox Series S|X. On the other hand, the M27Q is slightly better for most PC gamers, as it has slightly lower input lag and less overshoot.

ASUS VG279Q

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the ASUS VG279Q for most uses. The Gigabyte has a higher resolution to deliver a sharper image, and it also has better motion handling due to its higher refresh rate and faster response time. It offers more features, like HDR support, USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM.

ASUS VG279QM

The ASUS VG279QM and the Gigabyte M27Q are both excellent gaming monitors; it just depends on your preference. The ASUS has a higher refresh rate of 280Hz versus the Gigabyte's 170Hz, but the Gigabyte has a 1440p resolution, while the ASUS is just 1080p. For most people, the Gigabyte is a better choice because the increase in resolution is more noticeable than the higher refresh rate. However, if you like having a black frame insertion feature, only the ASUS lets you use it simultaneously with VRR. The Gigabyte offers more features, like a USB hub, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM.

Dell S2722DGM

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the Dell S2722DGM for most uses. The Gigabyte has a better response time to deliver a clearer image in fast-moving scenes. It has an IPS panel with wider viewing angles, a wider color gamut, and more features, like USB ports, HDR support, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM switch. That said, the Dell might be worth it if you like gaming in the dark because it uses a VA panel that can produce much deeper blacks.

ViewSonic VX2758-2KP-MHD

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the ViewSonic VX2758-2KP-MHD for most uses. The Gigabyte delivers a smoother gaming experience because it has a higher refresh rate and better response time. It also has better ergonomics, gets brighter to combat glare, and offers more features, like HDR support, USB-C input, and a Picture-in-Picture mode.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG27WQ1B

The Gigabyte M27Q performs better than the ASUS TUF Gaming VG27WQ1B for most uses. The Gigabyte has a slightly higher refresh rate of 170Hz compared to the ASUS' 165Hz, and its response time is significantly faster, especially in dark scenes. The Gigabyte has an IPS panel with wide viewing angles, making it a better choice for sharing content or playing co-op games, and it gets brighter to combat glare. The ASUS is better suited for dark rooms due to its VA panel's high contrast ratio, but for most gamers, it isn't worth compromising on the Gigabyte's significantly better response time.

LG 32GP850-B

The LG 32GP850-B is slightly better than the Gigabyte M27Q. The LG has a slightly faster refresh rate, which translates to a slightly better response time as well. The LG also has better reflection handling, and the stand can rotate to a portrait orientation. The LG has a larger screen, but the same resolution as the Gigabyte, so it has slightly worse text clarity, as the pixel density is a bit lower.

Dell Alienware AW2721D

The Dell Alienware AW2721D and the Gigabyte M27Q perform similarly overall. They're both great 27 inch 1440p gaming monitors, but the Dell feels noticeably better built and offers more adjustment options. The Dell also has a higher refresh rate, gets brighter in HDR, and has a faster response time, although there's less overshoot with the Gigabyte. That said, the Gigabyte may represent a better value to some people.

Samsung Odyssey G5 LC34G55T

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Samsung Odyssey G5 LC34G55T are very different monitors. The Gigabyte has a 27 inch IPS panel with a 16:9 aspect ratio, while the Samsung has a 34 inch VA panel with a 21:9 aspect ratio. For the most part, the Gigabyte performs better. It has a faster response time that results in a clearer image with less smearing behind fast-moving objects. It also has wider viewing angles, gets brighter, and offers more features, like USB-C input. The Samsung is better for dark rooms because it can produce deeper blacks, and its wider format might feel more immersive for some people.

Dell Alienware AW2521HF

The Dell Alienware AW2521HF and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great gaming monitors, but they're also very different. The Dell has a smaller 25 inch screen and a 1080p resolution, while the Gigabyte has a 27 inch screen with a 1440p resolution. The Dell has a higher refresh rate and better response time, but the difference might not be noticeable to casual gamers. The Gigabyte has more features, like HDR support, USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM switch.

ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV

The ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different monitors. The ASUS is designed for productivity and offers significantly better ergonomics. The Gigabyte is primarily a gaming monitor with a much higher refresh rate and faster response time to deliver a better gaming experience. The Gigabyte also has more features, like HDR support, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM switch so that you can control two devices with one set of peripherals. If you plan on only using it for work, it might be better to go with the ASUS because the Gigabyte has a BGR subpixel layout that might cause blurry text in some applications.

MSI Optix MAG271CQR

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the MSI Optix MAG271CQR for most uses. The Gigabyte has a better response time, especially in dark transitions, so it doesn't have the dark smearing present on the MSI. It has a higher refresh rate too, but it's only a slight increase and isn't really noticeable to most people. The Gigabyte has wider viewing angles, supports HDR, and offers more extra features, like a Picture-in-Picture mode and USB-C input. However, the MSI is better suited for dark rooms because it has a much higher contrast ratio to produce deeper blacks.

ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV

The ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV and the Gigabyte M27Q are meant for different purposes. While the Gigabyte is a gaming monitor, the ASUS is meant for content creation and multimedia. That said, the Gigabyte has an exceptionally wide color gamut, and it supports HDR, making it well-suited to photo and video editing. It also outperforms the ASUS when it comes to gaming, with a much higher refresh rate and faster response time. If gaming is less important to you, the ASUS may be a little more suited to an office setting, as it has more ergonomics adjustment options and wider viewing angles. 

ASUS TUF Gaming VG249Q1A

The ASUS TUF Gaming VG249Q1A and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different. The ASUS is a 24" model with a 1080p resolution, while the Gigabyte is a 27" with a 1440p resolution. The latter's larger screen size and higher resolution make it more versatile and better suited for work and media consumption. Gaming-wise, the ASUS has better response times, which results in less blur trail behind fast-moving objects. The Gigabyte supports HDR and has a much wider color gamut, and it also gets a lot brighter to combat glare. It also has more features, like a Picture-in-Picture mode and a USB-C port with DisplayPort Alt Mode.

ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q

The ASUS ROG Strix XG279Q and the Gigabyte M27Q are very similar in terms of gaming performance. The differences are in the features. The ASUS offers better ergonomics, and its black frame insertion feature is usable simultaneously with VRR to improve motion clarity. On the other hand, the Gigabyte has a USB-C input that supports DisplayPort and 10W charging, as well as a Picture-in-Picture mode and built-in KVM switch.

ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q

The ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great gaming monitors with excellent gaming performance. The biggest difference is that the Gigabyte is a native FreeSync monitor with G-SYNC compatibility, while the ASUS is a native G-SYNC monitor and doesn't support FreeSync. The ASUS has better ergonomics, but the Gigabyte has more features, like HDR support and USB-C input.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG34VQL1B

The ASUS TUF Gaming VG34VQL1B and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different monitors. The ASUS is a 34 inch ultrawide with a VA panel, while the Gigabyte is a 27 inch, 16:9 monitor with an IPS panel. The Gigabyte is better for gaming because it has a slightly higher refresh rate and faster response times. It also has wider viewing angles, and more features, like a USB-C port, an integrated KVM, and a Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture mode. The ASUS might be a better choice if you often game in the dark or want a better HDR experience because it has a much higher contrast ratio and gets brighter in HDR.

Acer Nitro VG271UP Pbmiipx

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the Acer Nitro VG271UP Pbmiipx for most uses. The Gigabyte has a higher refresh rate and faster response time to deliver a clearer image in fast-moving scenes. It also has better ergonomics and gets brighter to fight glare. It has more features, like a USB hub with two USB 3.0s and a USB-C that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM.

LG 27GN880-B

The LG 27GN880-B and the Gigabyte M27Q are both 27 inch, 1440p, IPS monitors with similar overall gaming performance. The Gigabyte has a higher refresh rate of 170Hz that makes it feel more responsive, but the LG has better response times at max refresh rate. If you plan on using the monitor in a bright room with sunlight, the Gigabyte is a better choice because it gets a lot brighter. However, the LG has a significantly better stand that takes up less desk space and provides more ergonomic adjustments. Feature-wise, the Gigabyte comes out ahead because it has a USB-C port with DisplayPort Alt Mode, an integrated KVM feature, and a Picture-in-Picture and Picture-by-Picture mode.

ASUS TUF VG32VQ

The ASUS TUF VG32VQ and the Gigabyte M27Q are both high-refresh gaming monitors, but the ASUS has a 32 inch VA panel, while the Gigabyte has a 27 inch IPS panel. The Gigabyte performs better gaming-wise because it has a faster response time and higher refresh rate. The Gigabyte also offers more features, like USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM switch.

Acer Nitro VG271 Pbmiipx

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the Acer Nitro VG271 Pbmiipx for most uses. The Gigabyte has a higher resolution to produce a sharper image and a quicker response time to deliver smoother motion. It supports a wide color gamut for HDR, and it has more extra features, like a Picture-in-Picture mode that lets you display two input signals simultaneously and a built-in KVM switch to control both devices with one set of peripherals. It also has a USB-C input that supports DisplayPort and 10W charging.

AOC CU34G2X

The Gigabyte M27Q and the AOC CU34G2X are very different monitors. The Gigabyte is a 27 inch monitor with a 16:9 aspect ratio, while the AOC is bigger at 34 inches and has a 21:9 aspect ratio for more screen space. They also have different panel types with unique characteristics; the Gigabyte has an IPS panel with wider viewing angles, and the AOC's VA panel has a higher contrast ratio. They each have a high refresh rate and VRR support for gaming, but motion looks smoother on the Gigabyte due to the quicker response time.

MSI Optix G27CQ4

The Gigabyte M27Q is better overall than the MSI Optix G27CQ4. The Gigabyte has a slightly higher 170Hz refresh rate compared to 165Hz on the MSI, and they each have a 1440p resolution, but they have different panel types. The Gigabyte has an IPS panel with wider viewing angles, which is great for sharing your screen with others, while the MSI has a VA panel with a better contrast ratio. The Gigabyte also has much quicker response times and supports HDR, which the MSI doesn't. The MSI uses an RGB subpixel layout, which is used in more programs than the BGR subpixel layout on the Gigabyte, so this helps with text clarity.

Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q-X

The Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q-X and the Gigabyte M27Q are both excellent gaming monitors with similar features. The FI27Q-X has a higher 240Hz refresh rate than the 170Hz on the M27Q, but they each have quick response times. The FI27Q-X has much better ergonomics as you can swivel it and rotate it into portrait mode. On the other hand, the M27Q has a USB-C input, which the FI27Q-X doesn't have, so you can display an image from a compatible device and charge it at the same time.

Acer Nitro XF243Y Pbmiiprx

The Acer Nitro XF243Y Pbmiiprx and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great budget monitors with similar gaming performance. The Gigabyte has a larger screen and higher resolution, and it also includes more features, like USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM.

LG 34GN850-B

The LG 34GN850-B and the Gigabyte M27Q have different aspect ratios. The LG is an ultrawide, while the Gigabyte has a standard 16:9 format. Gaming-wise, even though the Gigabyte has a slightly higher refresh rate, the LG has a faster response time at max refresh rate to deliver a clearer image in fast-moving scenes. However, if you often game at 60Hz, then the Gigabyte comes out ahead. The Gigabyte also has wider viewing angles, higher screen brightness, and more features, like USB-C input and a built-in KVM.

Samsung Odyssey G9

The Samsung Odyssey G9 and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different monitors. The Gigabyte has a 27 inch screen with a 16:9 aspect ratio, while the Samsung has a 49 inch screen with a 32:9 aspect ratio, essentially twice the size of the Gigabyte. The Samsung has a higher refresh rate of 240Hz, but the Gigabyte has a better response time. The Samsung is better for dark rooms because it has a VA panel with a much higher contrast ratio, and it also delivers a better HDR experience.

Samsung C27RG5

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Samsung C27RG5 use different panel technologies, each with their own strengths and weaknesses, but the Gigabyte is much better overall. The Gigabyte has better ergonomics, better viewing angles, a higher native resolution, and it supports HDR. The Gigabyte also has a much better response time, an optional black frame insertion feature, and lower input lag at 60Hz.

MSI Optix G272

The Gigabyte M27Q is much better than the MSI Optix G272. The Gigabyte has a higher native resolution, resulting in a higher pixel density and better text clarity. The Gigabyte also has better ergonomics, better viewing angles, and it supports HDR. Although the Gigabyte has a higher refresh rate, the response time is similar to the MSI. On the other hand, the MSI has much better reflection handling, but it's not quite as bright as the Gigabyte.

Dell Alienware AW2521H

The Dell Alienware AW2521H has a better response time and higher refresh rate than the Gigabyte M27Q, but the difference might not be noticeable to casual players. The Gigabyte has a larger screen and higher resolution, and it offers more features, like USB-C input and a Picture-in-Picture mode. The Dell has native G-SYNC support, while the Gigabyte has native FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility.

Dell S3222DGM

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Dell S3222DGM use different panel technologies, each with strengths and weaknesses, but overall, the Gigabyte is a much better monitor. The Gigabyte has much better viewing angles, supports HDR, and has a faster response time. The Dell looks better in a dark room, as it has much better contrast and better black uniformity.

LG 27GP950-B

The LG 27GP950-B is a bit better than the Gigabyte M27Q for most uses. The LG has a higher resolution screen and much better text clarity, so it's a bit better for media creators or office use. The LG also has two HDMI 2.1 ports, making it a better choice for PS5 or Xbox Series X gamers. On the other hand, the Gigabyte has better reflection handling and an optional backlight strobing feature.

Dell S3220DGF

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the Dell S3220DGF for most uses. The Gigabyte has a much better response time to deliver a clearer image in fast-moving scenes. It also has wider viewing angles, gets brighter to fight glare, and offers more features, like USB-C input and a built-in KVM switch. The Dell has a bigger screen, but it has the same 1440p resolution, so images and text don't appear as sharp as on the Gigabyte because it has a lower pixel density. That said, the Dell might be a good choice if you want better dark room performance because it uses a VA panel with a much better contrast ratio.

LG 32GN600-B

The Gigabyte M27Q is a much better monitor than the LG 32GN600-B for most people. The Gigabyte has wider viewing angles and better ergonomics, so it's a bit more versatile. The Gigabyte is also much better for gaming, with a significantly faster response time, especially at 60Hz. On the other hand, the LG is better for a dark room, as it has better contrast and better black uniformity.

LG 32GN650-B

The Gigabyte M27Q and the LG 32GN650-B are very different. The Gigabyte has a 27 inch IPS screen with wider viewing angles, while the LG has a 32 inch VA panel that produces deeper blacks for a better dark room viewing experience. The Gigabyte performs better gaming-wise because it has a much faster response time to deliver a clearer image in fast-moving scenes. It also gets brighter and offers more features, like a USB hub with USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a KVM switch.

ViewSonic Elite XG270QG

The ViewSonic Elite XG270QG and the Gigabyte M27Q perform very similarly gaming-wise. The main difference is that the ViewSonic is a native G-SYNC monitor with FreeSync compatibility, while the Gigabyte is a native FreeSync monitor with G-SYNC compatibility. The Gigabyte supports HDR, gets brighter, and has more extra features, like a Picture-in-Picture mode, a built-in KVM switch, and a USB-C port that supports DisplayPort and 10W charging.

LG 27GN650-B

The Gigabyte M27Q is better than the LG 27GN650-B overall. The Gigabyte has a higher refresh rate of 170Hz compared to the LG's 144Hz, and it has a 1440p resolution, whereas the LG is 1080p. The Gigabyte also has a wider color gamut, significantly higher peak brightness, and more features like a USB-C input, an integrated KVM, and a Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture mode. The LG has a slightly better response time at max refresh rate, but it's slower than the Gigabyte at 60Hz.

Acer Predator XB271HU Bmiprz

The Gigabyte M27Q is much better than the Acer Predator XB271HU Bmiprz. The Gigabyte has a significantly faster response time, which results in less ghosting behind fast-moving objects. It has better color accuracy, gets brighter, and offers more extra features, like a USB hub with a USB-C port, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM. It also supports HDR, which the Acer doesn't. The Gigabyte has both native FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility, whereas the Acer only supports G-SYNC.

Lenovo Legion Y27q-20

The Lenovo Legion Y27q-20 and the Gigabyte M27Q have very similar gaming performances, so they mainly differ in features. The Lenovo has better ergonomics because it allows for swivel and pivot adjustments. On the other hand, the Gigabyte gets brighter to combat glare, displays a wider range of colors in HDR, and offers more features, like USB-C input and a Picture-in-Picture mode.

LG 27GL650F-B

The Gigabyte M27Q performs better than the LG 27GL650F-B for most uses. The Gigabyte has a higher resolution to produce a sharper image, and it also delivers a smoother gaming experience due to its higher refresh rate and faster response time. It also has more features, like USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM switch.

LG 27UK650-W

The LG 27UK650-W and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different monitors. The LG is a 4k productivity monitor with a 60Hz refresh rate, while the Gigabyte is a 1440p model with a 170Hz refresh rate. If you only use it for work, the LG is a better choice because its higher pixel density means you get better text clarity. For gaming, the Gigabyte performs much better because it has a faster response time and higher refresh rate.

LG 34GP83A-B

The LG 34GP83A-B and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great monitors that deliver similar gaming performances. The main difference is that the LG is an ultrawide with a 21:9 aspect ratio, while the Gigabyte has a standard 16:9 format. The Gigabyte has wider viewing angles, gets brighter, and offers more features, like USB-C input and a built-in KVM.

ASUS ROG Strix XG27UQ

The ASUS ROG Strix XG27UQ and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great gaming monitors. The Gigabyte performs a bit better than the ASUS gaming-wise because it has faster response time and refresh rate. The ASUS has a higher 4k resolution to deliver a sharper image, but it requires high-end hardware with a GPU that supports Display Stream Compression to achieve high frame rates at 4k.

LG 27GN950-B

The LG 27GN950-B and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great gaming monitors. The LG has a higher resolution than the Gigabyte, but the difference in sharpness might not be noticeable for most people at typical viewing distances. Gaming-wise, they're very similar; the Gigabyte has a slightly higher refresh rate, but the LG has a better response time. The Gigabyte has more features, like USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM switch.

BenQ ZOWIE XL2546K

The Gigabyte M27Q performs better than the BenQ ZOWIE XL2546K for most uses. Although the BenQ has a higher refresh rate and a better response time, it has more motion artifacts in fast-moving scenes than the Gigabyte, which might bother some people. The Gigabyte's larger IPS panel has a higher resolution and provides wider viewing angles than the BenQ's TN panel. It also gets brighter, supports HDR, and offers more features, like USB-C input and a Picture-in-Picture mode.

Acer Nitro XV340CK Pbmiipphzx

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Acer Nitro XV340CK Pbmiipphzx are both great gaming monitors. However, they're also quite different. The Gigabyte is a 27 inch, 16:9 model, while the Acer is a 34 inch ultrawide with a 21:9 aspect ratio. The Gigabyte performs better gaming-wise because it has a better response time. It also has better build quality, wider viewing angles, and gets brighter to combat glare. The Gigabyte has a much wider color gamut, with near-full Adobe RGB coverage, making it a better choice for content creation. Lastly, it has more features than the Acer, like USB-C input and a built-in KVM switch. 

Gigabyte M34WQ

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Gigabyte M34WQ deliver similar performance overall but have a different form factor. The Gigabyte M27Q has a slightly faster refresh rate and a bit better motion handling. The M34WQ has an ultrawide aspect ratio that's better for productivity, and it delivers a more immersive gaming experience. The increased resolution requires a more powerful graphics card, though, so if your PC can't maintain high frame rates with a 16x9 aspect ratio, it'll be even worse with an ultrawide.

BenQ EW3270U

The BenQ EW3270U and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different monitors. The BenQ is a 32 inch, 4k model designed for everyday productivity, while the Gigabyte is a 27 inch, 1440p gaming monitor. The Gigabyte offers better quality-of-life features, such as better ergonomics, higher screen brightness to fight glare, and USB ports. It also provides a more responsive desktop experience due to its high refresh rate and fast response time. On the other hand, the BenQ offers more screen real estate for work, better text clarity, as well as a higher contrast ratio to produce deeper blacks.

LG 34GP950G-B

The Gigabyte M27Q and the LG 34GP950G-B are pretty similar overall, but there are some design differences that may make one better than the other depending on your personal preferences. The LG has an ultrawide curved screen, which delivers a more immersive gaming experience. The LG also has a slightly faster response time, and it's a native G-SYNC monitor. The Gigabyte, on the other hand, has a flat 16:9 display, which some content creators might prefer, and it has an optional black frame insertion feature.

ASUS TUF Gaming VG258QM

The ASUS TUF Gaming VG258QM and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different gaming monitors, so you should go with the one that best suits your needs. At 25 inches, the ASUS is smaller than the 27 inch Gigabyte, and it uses a TN panel with a 1080p resolution. The Gigabyte has an IPS panel, so it has much better viewing angles than the ASUS. The Gigabyte's 1440p resolution also delivers a sharper image. While the ASUS has a higher refresh rate and a slightly faster response time at max, the Gigabyte has a faster response time at 60Hz, so it may be the better option for console gaming.

LG 27GN750-B

The LG 27GN750-B and the Gigabyte M27Q are both great gaming monitors, so it comes down to whether you want a higher refresh rate or a higher resolution. The LG provides a smoother and more responsive gaming experience, but the difference isn't huge and less noticeable than the Gigabyte's higher resolution, which results in a much sharper image. The Gigabyte gets brighter to combat glare and has more features, like USB-C input, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM switch.

Gigabyte G34WQC

The Gigabyte G34WQC and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different monitors. The G34WQC is an ultrawide monitor with a 21:9 aspect ratio, and it uses a VA panel, whereas the M27Q has a standard 16:9 aspect ratio and uses an IPS panel. The M27Q performs better for gaming because it has a higher refresh rate and faster response time. It can display a wide range of colors in HDR, and it offers more features, like a built-in KVM switch and a USB hub with USB-C input. On the other hand, the G34WQC is better suited for dark rooms, and its wider screen feels more immersive.

LG 32UL500-W

The LG 32UL500-W and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different types of monitors. The LG is a 32 inch, 4k model designed for everyday productivity, while the Gigabyte is a 27 inch, 1440p gaming monitor. The Gigabyte performs better for the most part. It has better motion handling to deliver a smoother gaming experience, as well as more features, like USB ports, a Picture-in-Picture mode, and a built-in KVM switch. It also has wider viewing angles and gets brighter to combat glare. However, it doesn't perform as well as the LG in dark rooms because it has a low contrast ratio that makes blacks appear gray.

Dell Alienware AW3821DW

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Dell Alienware AW3821DW are both great gaming monitors, but they're also quite different. The Gigabyte is a 27 inch model with a 16:9 aspect ratio, while the Dell is a 38 inch ultrawide with a 21:9 aspect ratio. The Gigabyte provides smoother gameplay because it has a higher refresh rate and a quicker response time. However, the Dell is a good choice if you want better immersion. It also gets brighter to deliver a better HDR experience.

Dell UltraSharp U2720Q

The Dell UltraSharp U2720Q and the Gigabyte M27Q are monitors designed for different uses. The Dell is a 4k model that's better suited for productivity because it delivers sharper text and has better ergonomics. Also, its USB-C port has a much higher power output to charge laptops, whereas the Gigabyte's USB-C is limited to 10W. On the other hand, the Gigabyte is a much better gaming monitor because it has a higher refresh rate, a significantly better response time, and VRR support to reduce screen tearing.

LG 48 C1 OLED

The Gigabyte M27Q and the LG 48 C1 OLED are both excellent for gaming, but they're different types of displays. The LG is a 48 inch TV we tested as a monitor, and it uses an OLED panel. This allows it to display a near-infinite contrast ratio with perfect black levels, and it has HDMI 2.1 inputs, allowing you to play 4k games up to 120fps over an HDMI connection. On the other hand, the Gigabyte is a typical monitor with a smaller screen and 1440p resolution, meaning it has better text clarity. It gets significantly brighter, and LED panels don't risk permanent burn-in like OLEDs.

Gigabyte AORUS FI32U

The Gigabyte AORUS FI32U is slightly better than the Gigabyte M27Q overall. The FI32U has better ergonomics, a higher resolution screen, and it supports HDMI 2.1, making it a better choice for next-gen console gamers. The M27Q, on the other hand, has a better horizontal viewing angle and much lower input lag when gaming at 60Hz.

Samsung Odyssey Neo G9

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Samsung Odyssey Neo G9 are very different types of monitors. The Gigabyte is a 27 inch 1440p monitor, while the Samsung is a 49 inch, 5120x1440 display, which is the equivalent of placing two of the Gigabytes side-by-side. The Gigabyte also has an IPS panel with wider viewing angles, and the Samsung has a VA panel with much better contrast. The Samsung features Mini LED backlighting, meaning it gets much brighter, and it has a good full-array local dimming feature. However, motion looks much smoother on the Gigabyte because there's less overshoot.

Acer Nitro XV282K KVbmiipruzx

The Acer Nitro XV282K KVbmiipruzx and the Gigabyte M27Q are excellent gaming monitors, but they have a few differences. The Acer is a 4k monitor with a 144Hz max refresh rate, while the Gigabyte is 1440p and has a higher 170Hz refresh rate. The Acer has significantly better ergonomics as you can swivel it and use it in portrait mode. On the other hand, the Gigabyte gets brighter, making it a better choice for well-lit rooms, and its response time at 60Hz is quicker, so motion looks smoother.

LG 38GN950-B

The LG 38GN950-B and the Gigabyte M27Q are quite different. The LG is an ultrawide monitor with a 21:9 aspect ratio, while the Gigabyte is a standard 16:9 model. This means that the LG provides more horizontal screen space, making it feel more immersive in games. Although the LG has an unconventional 3840x1600 resolution, it's about the same pixel density as the Gigabyte, so images and text look just as sharp. The LG has a lower refresh rate of 160Hz compared to the Gigabyte's 170Hz, but its response time is slightly quicker. If you want to game in HDR, the LG delivers a better experience because it has a wider color gamut and gets a lot brighter. It has local dimming, which the Gigabyte lacks, but it's edge-lit and performs terribly. The Gigabyte has more features, like a USB-C port and an integrated KVM.

Gigabyte AORUS FV43U

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Gigabyte AORUS FV43U are two very different displays that target different users, so the best one depends on your needs. The FV43U is more like a small TV than a monitor, with a large 43 inch screen and a fixed stand. The FV43U has a VA panel with deep uniform blacks. The M27Q has an IPS panel with wide viewing angles but worse contrast. The M27Q also has lower input lag and a faster response time at 60Hz.

Samsung Odyssey G3 S24AG30

The Gigabyte M27Q is much better for gaming than the Samsung Odyssey G3 S24AG30, but they're different types of monitors. The Gigabyte has a 1440p resolution with an IPS panel that has wide viewing angles, while the Samsung has a 1080p resolution and the VA panel has higher contrast. The Gigabyte is more versatile because it gets brighter, has much better motion handling, and it supports HDR, but the HDR support doesn't add much because it lacks local dimming. The Gigabyte also has a few more features like a USB-C input and two USB 3.0 inputs, which the Samsung doesn't have.

Acer Predator X25 bmiiprzx

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Acer Predator X25 bmiiprzx are amazing monitors, but they're also very different. The Gigabyte is a bit larger at 27 inches, with a 170Hz refresh rate and higher 1440p resolution. Meanwhile, the Acer is 25 inches and is limited to 1080p, but it has an incredible 360Hz refresh rate aimed at competitive gamers. They have very similar response times and very little input lag, but the Gigabyte has a significantly wider color gamut.

MSI Optix G27C6

The Gigabyte M27Q is a much better monitor than the MSI Optix G27C6, but there are some noticeable differences between each. The Gigabyte is a 1440p monitor with HDR support, while the MSI is limited to 1080p and doesn't support HDR. The Gigabyte has much quicker response times for smoother motion, and its IPS panel has wider viewing angles. However, the MSI has a VA panel with a better contrast ratio, so blacks appear deeper when viewed in the dark.

Corsair XENEON 32QHD165

Other than the difference in size, the Gigabyte M27Q and the Corsair Xeneon 32QHD165 are pretty similar overall. The Gigabyte has a slightly faster maximum refresh rate, and the smaller screen size results in slightly better text clarity. On the other hand, the Corsair has slightly better ergonomics and a slightly faster response time at the max refresh rate.

Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED

The Gigabyte AORUS FO48U OLED and the Gigabyte M27Q are both excellent gaming monitors, but they're very different, and the best one depends on your needs and usage. The FO48U is a very large monitor with an OLED screen, which delivers perfect blacks, wide viewing angles, and a nearly instantaneous response time. Unfortunately, the FO48U has a chance of permanent burn-in, which can be an issue when used as a desktop monitor. If you want a standard desktop monitor with no risk of burn-in, the M27Q is a safer choice.

ASUS ROG Strix XG17AHPE

These two monitors are very different, but unless you need a portable gaming monitor, the Gigabyte M27Q is much better than the ASUS ROG Strix XG17AHPE. The Gigabyte's larger, higher-resolution screen is better for multitasking and delivers a more immersive gaming experience. On the other hand, the ASUS has slightly faster response times, but it's not a very noticeable difference. The ASUS is also much more portable, designed to be carried in a laptop bag or backpack, and it even has a 7800mAh battery built-in.

MSI Oculux NXG253R

The Gigabyte M27Q and the MSI Oculux NXG253R are very similar overall, with a few design differences. The Gigabyte has a larger screen, and it delivers a better HDR experience, with a better color gamut and higher peak brightness. The Gigabyte is also more accurate out of the box. The MSI has better ergonomics and a faster refresh rate, but the response time performance is about the same.

Razer Raptor 27 165Hz

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Razer Raptor 27 165Hz are both great 1440p, 27 inch monitors. Motion looks smoother on the Gigabyte because it has a slightly higher 170Hz refresh rate and a quicker response time, especially at 60Hz. The Gigabyte is better for content creators because it has even better coverage of the Adobe RGB color space and has better out-of-the-box accuracy, but this can vary between units. Even though the Razer doesn't get as bright, it's still a better choice for use in well-lit rooms because it has better reflection handling.

ASUS VG246H

The Gigabyte M27Q is significantly better than the ASUS VG246H. The Gigabyte has a larger, higher-resolution screen, making it a better choice for multitasking or a more immersive gaming experience. The Gigabyte supports HDR and has significantly better response times and a higher refresh rate, so motion looks much clearer. On the other hand, the ASUS has much better ergonomics and better reflection handling.

Lenovo ThinkVision M14

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Lenovo ThinkVision M14 are two very different monitors. The Gigabyte is designed for gaming, while the Lenovo is a portable monitor. The Gigabyte has a higher 1440p resolution and 170Hz refresh rate, and it has a much larger screen. The Gigabyte has more gaming features like VRR support and extremely quick response times. The Lenovo has a 1080p resolution, but because it has a smaller screen, it has a higher pixel density that results in clearer text. Since it's a portable monitor, it's much lighter.

Dell UltraSharp U4021QW

The Gigabyte M27Q and the Dell UltraSharp U4021QW are two very different monitors, each with a lot to offer but in different ways. The Gigabyte is a great gaming monitor, with a higher refresh rate, faster response times, and VRR support. The Dell is an ultrawide office monitor with an exceptionally high 5k resolution but fewer extra features. The Dell doesn't have VRR or HDR support but is a good choice if you need a large monitor with an exceptional resolution.

ASUS ProArt PA148CTV

The Gigabyte M27Q and the ASUS ProArt PA148CTV are very different types of monitor, so the results aren't really comparable. The Gigabyte is a desktop gaming monitor with a high refresh rate, fast response time, and low input lag. The ASUS is a portable monitor designed for portable productivity. The ASUS is much smaller, with very limited features and a 60Hz refresh rate.

MSI Optix MAG161V

The Gigabyte M27Q and the MSI Optix MAG161V are designed for different uses, so they're not really directly comparable. The MSI is a portable monitor with a 16 inch 1080p screen. The MSI is designed for productivity on the go, giving a bit of extra screen space to work with when connected to a laptop or other portable device. The Gigabyte is a desktop gaming monitor with a 27 inch 1440p screen. The Gigabyte delivers a much better experience overall but isn't portable.

Dell S2421H

The Gigabyte M27Q is much better than the Dell S2421H. The Gigabyte has a larger, higher-resolution screen, with a faster refresh rate, much faster response time, and better ergonomics. The Gigabyte has lower input lag, better viewing angles, and it supports HDR.

ASUS ZenScreen Go MB16AHP

The ASUS ZenScreen Go MB16AHP and the Gigabyte M27Q are very different monitors. The ASUS is a compact portable display with a 14" screen, while the Gigabyte is a desktop gaming monitor. Unless you need the portability of the ASUS, the Gigabyte is a better choice for most uses.

ASUS ZenScreen Touch MB16AMT

The Gigabyte M27Q and the ASUS ZenScreen Touch MB16AMT are different monitors, each with pros and cons. The Gigabyte is a standard 27 inch monitor with a stand, while the ASUS is a smaller, portable monitor. The Gigabyte has a ton more features like HDR support, VRR support, a 170Hz refresh rate, and more inputs; it also has a quicker response time, gets brighter, and a wider SDR color gamut. Though the ASUS is smaller and has a lower resolution, it has a higher pixel density that results in clearer text, and it's easier to carry around.

ASUS ZenScreen MB14AC

The ASUS ZenScreen MB14AC and the Gigabyte M27Q are designed for different uses. The ASUS is a 14" portable monitor with a 1080p resolution and 60Hz refresh rate, and the Gigabyte is a 27" gaming monitor with a 1440p resolution and 170Hz refresh rate. For the most part, the Gigabyte is a better choice unless you need portability. It has a bigger screen, better performance, and many more features. The ASUS is best suited for displaying text documents because it has a narrow color gamut that makes the image look washed out, which isn't ideal for content creation, and its bad response times make it a mediocre choice for gaming.

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