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Reviewed on Jul 03, 2019

Sony X800G TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings - Version 1.3
7.4
Mixed Usage
Value for price beaten by
: Hisense H8F
6.0
Movies
8.0
TV Shows
7.8
Sports
7.8
Video Games
6.1
HDR Movies
7.3
HDR Gaming
8.1
PC Monitor
Type : LED
Sub-Type
:
IPS
Resolution : 4k

The Sony X800G is a decent 4k TV with an IPS panel, which delivers wide viewing angles and good peak brightness. It has very good motion handling, with an excellent response time, so fast-moving objects look great, with very little blur behind them. Unfortunately, like the majority of IPS TVs, this TV doesn't look as good in a dark room, as blacks look gray in a dark viewing environment. It also has higher than average input lag, which, while fine for casual gamers, may be disappointing for serious gamers or if you're planning on using it as a PC monitor.

Black Friday deal: The Sony X800G 55” has dropped by $200 on Amazon.com. See all Black Friday deals on TVs.
Test Results
Design 8.5
Picture Quality 7.2
Motion 7.7
Inputs 8.2
Sound Quality 6.1
Smart Features 8.0
Pros
  • Image remains accurate at an angle.
  • Very good motion handling.
Cons
  • Blacks look gray in a dark room.
  • Higher than average input lag.

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Market Context

The X800G is an entry-level 2019 LED TV from Sony. It's the direct replacement for the 2018 XF8096 Series TV, which was never released in North America, and is very similar to the X750F. Its main competitors this year are the Samsung RU7100, TCL 6 Series R617, and the Vizio V Series 2019.

8.5

Design

Curved : No

The Sony X800G has a great design. It looks almost identical to last year's X750F, but with a matte black stand instead of a silver one. The stand supports the TV well, but does wobble a bit, and the legs are nearly the same width as the TV and can't be reversed. The back of the TV is plain, and there is only minimal cable management through the back of the feet. The TV has good build quality, and we didn't notice any issues or areas of concern with our unit.

Stand

The stand supports the TV well, but doesn't prevent it from wobbling. It's nearly the full width of the TV, so you'll need a wide table if you aren't planning on wall mounting it. The feet can't be reversed to save space.

Footprint of the 55" model: 39.0" x 13.2"

Back
Wall Mount : VESA 200x200

The back is plain, but appears well-built. Like the X750F, there is only basic cable management, through a hollow section on the back of each foot. Some of the inputs are down-facing in a cut-out on the back, and they might be difficult to access when wall-mounted.

Borders
Borders : 0.61" (1.6 cm)

The borders are about average, and aren't very distracting.

Thickness
Max Thickness : 3.15" (8.0 cm)

The X800G is a bit thicker than most TVs we've tested, and stands out a bit more when wall-mounted. It looks very similar to the X750F, and is quite a bit thicker than the X800E.

Temperature
Maximum Temperature
:
104 °F (40 °C)
Average Temperature
:
97 °F (36 °C)
7.5 Build Quality

The Sony X800G has good build quality. The external panels are a mix of metal and plastic, and we didn't notice any issues or areas of concern. There is a slight backwards tilt on our unit; we don't know if this is a flaw with our unit, or intentional. Either way, it's very minor and not noticeable.

7.2

Picture Quality

The Sony X800G delivers decent overall picture quality. Like most IPS TVs, it can't display deep blacks in a dark room, but has wide viewing angles, great for wide seating areas. It has good peak brightness for watching SDR content, and very good reflection handling, so it looks good in a bright room. With HDR content it can get decently bright, but bright highlights aren't very bright and don't stand out as much as they should. This TV can display a wide color gamut, though, which is great. The X800G has decent gray uniformity, and the center of the screen appears uniform, which is great for sports fans.

6.0 Contrast
Native Contrast
:
977 : 1
Contrast with local dimming
:
N/A

Update 07/11/2019: We have received information that the 75" model (XBR-75X800G) has a VA panel. It likely has much better contrast.

Like the majority of IPS TVs, the X800G has a mediocre contrast ratio. This isn't very noticeable in a bright room, but when watching in a dark room, blacks appear gray. Unfortunately, there is no local dimming feature to improve the contrast ratio.

0 Local Dimming
Local Dimming
:
No
Backlight
:
Direct

The Sony XBR-55X800G does not have a local dimming feature. The above video is provided for reference only. According to Sony's website, the 43" and 49" models are edge lit.

7.6 SDR Peak Brightness
SDR Real Scene Peak Brightness
:
291 cd/m²
SDR Peak 2% Window
:
333 cd/m²
SDR Peak 10% Window
:
333 cd/m²
SDR Peak 25% Window
:
333 cd/m²
SDR Peak 50% Window
:
333 cd/m²
SDR Peak 100% Window
:
332 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 2% Window
:
332 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 10% Window
:
333 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 25% Window
:
332 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 50% Window
:
332 cd/m²
SDR Sustained 100% Window
:
332 cd/m²
SDR ABL
:
0.000

The X800G has good peak brightness in SDR, and is brighter than the X750F, but not quite as bright as the X800E. This TV is bright enough for most rooms, but might not be bright enough to overcome direct glare from a nearby window. There is no variation in brightness with different content, which is great.

We measured the peak brightness after calibration, using the 'Custom' Picture Mode and the Color Temperature set to 'Expert 1'.

If accuracy isn't as important to you, with the 'Vivid' Picture Mode, the X800G is able to reach a peak brightness of 440 cd/m², as measured with the 100% window.

6.5 HDR Peak Brightness
HDR Real Scene Peak Brightness
:
343 cd/m²
HDR Peak 2% Window
:
393 cd/m²
HDR Peak 10% Window
:
394 cd/m²
HDR Peak 25% Window
:
394 cd/m²
HDR Peak 50% Window
:
394 cd/m²
HDR Peak 100% Window
:
393 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 2% Window
:
392 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 10% Window
:
394 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 25% Window
:
393 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 50% Window
:
393 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 100% Window
:
393 cd/m²
HDR ABL
:
0.000

Decent HDR peak brightness, but bright highlights in some scenes don't stand out as much, as they aren't as bright as they should be. Like in SDR, the X800G is slightly brighter than the X750F, but not as bright as the X800E.

We measured the peak brightness before calibration, using the 'Cinema Pro' Picture Mode and the Color Temperature set to 'Expert 2'.

If accuracy isn't as important to you, with the 'Vivid' Picture Mode and Adv. Contrast Enhancer on 'High' , the X800G is able to reach a peak brightness of 470 cd/m², as measured with the 50% window.

6.9 Gray Uniformity
50% Std. Dev.
:
5.255 %
50% DSE
:
0.188 %
5% Std. Dev.
:
0.728 %
5% DSE
:
0.120 %

Decent gray uniformity. There is noticeable vignetting, but the center of the screen has better uniformity. In near-dark scenes the uniformity is much better, and there are few noticeable issues.

7.7 Viewing Angle
Color Washout
:
36 °
Color Shift
:
55 °
Brightness Loss
:
37 °
Black Level Raise
:
70 °
Gamma Shift
:
44 °

Update 07/11/2019: We have received information that the 75" model (XBR-75X800G) has a VA panel. It likely has a worse viewing angle.

Like most IPS TVs, the X800G has very good viewing angles. At wide angles, the image loses brightness, and the image gradually looks more and more washed out. Colors gradually wash out, but remain accurate until a very wide angle.

5.7 Black Uniformity
Native Std. Dev.
:
2.230 %
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
:
N/A

Update 07/11/2019: We have received information that the 75" model (XBR-75X800G) has a VA panel. It likely has much better black uniformity.

The Sony X800G has disappointing black uniformity. There is noticeable clouding around our test cross, covering almost the entire screen. Unfortunately, there is no local dimming feature.

7.9 Reflections
Screen Finish
:
Semi-gloss
Total Reflections
:
5.5 %
Indirect Reflections
:
0.2 %

Very good reflection handling on the Sony XBR55X800G. Reflections are always noticeable, and are never fully diffused across the screen, but shouldn't cause too many issues.

7.0 Pre Calibration
White Balance dE
:
3.90
Color dE
:
2.78
Gamma
:
2.22
Color Temperature
:
5809 K
Picture Mode
:
Custom
Color Temp Setting
:
Expert 1
Gamma Setting
:
0

With our pre-calibration settings, the X800G has decent accuracy. There are some noticeable errors in almost all colors, as well as brighter shades of gray. Gamma is very close to the target of 2.2, which is great.

9.1 Post Calibration
White Balance dE
:
0.70
Color dE
:
1.87
Gamma
:
2.20
Color Temperature
:
6443 K
White Balance Calibration
:
10 point
Color Calibration
:
No
Auto-Calibration Function
:
No

After calibration, colors are more accurate, and the white balance is significantly improved. There are still a few inaccuracies that some people might notice, but overall accuracy is excellent. Gamma is almost perfect, and the color temperature is much closer to our target of 6500 K.

See our recommended settings here.

8.0 480p Input

480p content, like DVDs, looks great, with no obvious artifacts or issues.

8.0 720p Input

720p content looks great, with no noticeable issues.

9.0 1080p Input

1080p content looks excellent, almost as good as native 4k content. Nearest-neighbor upscaling is available for 1080p content, by selecting the 'Graphics' Picture Mode

10 4k Input

4k content is displayed perfectly, with no pixel artifacts or rendering issues.

7.6 Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
:
Yes
DCI P3 xy
:
84.48 %
DCI P3 uv
:
91.64 %
Rec 2020 xy
:
61.43 %
Rec 2020 uv
:
68.14 %

The Sony X800G has a good color gamut, and unlike the X750F, it can display a wide color gamut, which is great for HDR content.

The HDR EOTF follows the target PQ curve well, but like many Sony TVs, including the X800E and X750F, dark scenes are over-brightened a bit. In 'Game' mode, the EOTF is nearly identical.

If you find HDR too dim, check out our recommended settings here. With these settings, HDR content appears much brighter on the X800G, as shown here.

6.0 Color Volume
Normalized DCI P3 Coverage ITP
:
66.6 %
10,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage ITP
:
29.3 %
Normalized Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
:
54.1 %
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage ITP
:
23.7 %

Mediocre color volume. It can't display deep, saturated colors due to the low contrast ratio, and like most LED TVs, it can't produce very bright blues, although this shouldn't be very noticeable.

8.0 Gradient
Color Depth
:
10 Bit
Red (Std. Dev.)
:
0.120 dE
Green (Std. Dev.)
:
0.114 dE
Blue (Std. Dev.)
:
0.102 dE
Gray (Std. Dev.)
:
0.092 dE

Great gradient performance, but there is noticeable banding in all colors, especially in greens and shades of gray. Unfortunately, there is no smooth gradation feature to remove any imperfections.

10 Temporary Image Retention
IR after 0 min recovery
:
0.00 %
IR after 2 min recovery
:
0.00 %
IR after 4 min recovery
:
0.00 %
IR after 6 min recovery
:
0.00 %
IR after 8 min recovery
:
0.00 %
IR after 10 min recovery
:
0.00 %

There are no signs of temporary image retention, even immediately after displaying our high-contrast static test image for 10 minutes, which is great.

We don't know why the image appears red. It isn't as red in real life, and we suspect that this is an issue with the color temperature changing at low brightness levels, which is exaggerated by our over-exposed image.

We did notice a persistent flicker after displaying content with a flicker in it. This is similar to what we saw on the LG 27UK650. Although not very noticeable with most content, it might be noticeable in some rare cases.

10 Permanent Burn-In Risk
Permanent Burn-In Risk
:
No

Although some IPS panels can suffer from temporary image retention, this doesn't appear to be permanent as seen in our long-term test.

Pixels

Unlike the X800E, this TV uses a PLS (Plane-to-Line-Switching) panel, similar to the X750F. PLS is technically different, but similar, to IPS.

7.7

Motion

The Sony X800G has good overall motion handling. It has a great response time, but there is noticeable overshoot in some scenes. The backlight doesn't use flicker to dim, which is great. This TV has an optional black frame insertion feature, but can only flicker at 120Hz, which causes noticeable duplications in 60Hz content.

8.7 Response Time
80% Response Time
:
4.6 ms
100% Response Time
:
14.6 ms

The X800G has a great response time, but some transitions show some overshoot, which can cause inverse ghosting, which can be especially noticeable in dark scenes.

10 Flicker-Free
Flicker-Free
:
No
PWM Dimming Frequency
:
0 Hz

This TV doesn't use flicker to dim the backlight, which is great, but it isn't technically flicker-free, as there is a very high frequency flicker at low backlight settings. This flicker is very common on Sony TVs, including the X800E and X750F, and isn't noticeable.

5.4 Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
Optional BFI
:
Yes
Min Flicker for 60 fps
:
120 Hz
60 Hz for 60 fps
:
No
120 Hz for 120 fps
:
N/A
Min Flicker for 60 fps in Game Mode
:
120 Hz

The Sony X800G has an optional black frame insertion feature that can help improve the appearance of motion, by reducing the amount of time each frame appears on screen. Like the X800E, it can only flicker at 120Hz, which causes duplications in 60Hz content, which might bother some people.

7.0 Motion Interpolation
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
:
Yes
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
:
No

The X800G has a 60Hz panel, and can interpolate lower frame rate content up to 60Hz. Some artifacts are noticeable in intense scenes, but it looks smooth.

See here for the settings that control the X800G's motion interpolation feature.

7.6 Stutter
Frame Hold Time @ 24 fps
:
27.1 ms
Frame Hold Time @ 60 fps
:
2.1 ms

Since this TV has a slightly slower response time, there is less noticeable stutter when watching 24p content, like movies.

5.6 24p Judder
Judder-Free 24p
:
Yes
Judder-Free 24p via 60p
:
No
Judder-Free 24p via 60i
:
No
Judder-Free 24p via Native Apps
:
No

The X800G can only remove judder from native 24p sources, and does not require any additional settings to do so. It can't remove judder from the native apps, or from 60p/i sources, like a cable box.

0 Variable Refresh Rate
Native Refresh Rate
:
60 Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
:
No
4k VRR Maximum
:
N/A
4k VRR Minimum
:
N/A
1080p VRR Maximum
:
N/A
1080p VRR Minimum
:
N/A
1440p VRR Maximum
:
N/A
1440p VRR Minimum
:
N/A
VRR Supported Connectors
:
N/A

The Sony XBR-55X800G has a simple 60Hz refresh rate, and doesn't support any of the variable refresh rate technologies, like FreeSync or HDMI Forum VRR.

8.2

Inputs

The Sony X800G supports most of the common input resolutions, and can display chroma 4:4:4 properly with any of the common formats. The input lag in Game mode is low enough for most casual gamers, but may disappoint more serious gamers, and is higher than most TVs currently on the market. This TV supports HDR10, but unlike higher-end Sony TVs, it does not support Dolby Vision and doesn't support eARC.

8.1 Input Lag
1080p @ 60 Hz
:
32.5 ms
1080p @ 60 Hz Outside Game Mode
:
65.8 ms
1440p @ 60 Hz
:
34.4 ms
4k @ 60 Hz
:
34.5 ms
4k @ 60 Hz + 10 bit HDR
:
34.5 ms
4k @ 60 Hz @ 4:4:4
:
34.5 ms
4k @ 60 Hz Outside Game Mode
:
51.2 ms
4k @ 60 Hz With Interpolation
:
67.8 ms
8k @ 60 Hz
:
N/A
1080p @ 120 Hz
:
N/A
1440p @ 120 Hz
:
N/A
4k @ 120 Hz
:
N/A
1080p with Variable Refresh Rate
:
N/A
1440p with VRR
:
N/A
4k with VRR
:
N/A
8k with VRR
:
N/A
Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM)
:
No

The Sony XBR55X800G has very good input lag in Game mode, good enough for slower-paced games, but it is higher than most similar TVs currently on the market, and it might disappoint more serious gamers.

8.3 Supported Resolutions
1080p @ 60 Hz @ 4:4:4
:
Yes
1080p @ 120 Hz
:
No
1440p @ 60 Hz
:
Yes (forced resolution required)
1440p @ 120 Hz
:
No
4k @ 60 Hz
:
Yes
4k @ 60 Hz @ 4:4:4
:
Yes
4k @ 120 Hz
:
No
8k @ 30 Hz or 24 Hz
:
No
8k @ 60 Hz
:
No

The X800G supports many of the more common formats, but is limited to 60Hz. All supported resolutions display chroma 4:4:4 properly, but only on HDMI ports 2 & 3, and with the 'Game' or 'Graphics' Picture Mode. Like many other Sony TVs, these two ports are the only full bandwidth ports.

Like the X750F, when using the 'Graphics' Picture Mode the X800G uses nearest neighbor upscaling when sent a 1080p signal.

Input Photos
Total Inputs
HDMI : 4
USB : 3
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 1
Analog Audio Out RCA : 0
Component In : 1 (shared)
Composite In : 1 (shared)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 1
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 1
SD/SDHC : 0

The analog audio out port can also be used as a subwoofer port.

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
:
Yes
HDR10+
:
No
Dolby Vision
:
No
HLG
:
Yes
3D
:
No
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwidth
:
Yes (HDMI 2, 3)
HDMI 2.1
:
No
CEC : Yes
HDCP 2.2 : Yes (HDMI 1,2,3,4)
USB 3.0
:
Yes (1)
Variable Analog Audio Out : Yes
Wi-Fi Support : Yes (2.4 GHz, 5 GHz)

Unlike more advanced Sony TVs, this TV does not support Dolby Vision HDR. Sony advertises this TV as HDCP 2.3 compliant, but we don't currently have a way to test for this.

Audio Passthrough
ARC
:
Yes (HDMI 3)
eARC support
:
No
Dolby Atmos via TrueHD via eARC
:
No
DTS:X via DTS-HD MA via eARC
:
No
5.1 Dolby Digital via ARC
:
Yes
5.1 DTS via ARC
:
Yes
5.1 Dolby Digital via Optical
:
Yes
5.1 DTS via Optical
:
Yes

Like the Sony A8G, this TV can play lossy Dolby Atmos as a Dolby Digital Plus signal from the native Apps, including Netflix.

This TV does not support eARC.

6.1

Sound Quality

The Sony X800G delivers mediocre overall sound. It has a mediocre frequency response, with a bass that can't produce any thump or rumble, and has very little punch. Dialog is are clear and intelligible though, which is great. This TV can get quite loud, without producing much pumping, which is great, but the total harmonic distortion increases drastically at high volume. For a better sound, dedicated speakers or a soundbar is recommended (see our recommendations for the best soundbars).

6.2 Frequency Response
Low-Frequency Extension
:
134.54 Hz
Std. Dev. @ 70
:
4.23 dB
Std. Dev. @ 80
:
4.44 dB
Std. Dev. @ Max
:
6.23 dB
Max